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Another Beginners Ski Selection question

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

Skier stats-

 

5'7"  155lbs  Beginner (have skied three sessions, able to go down easy blues and power stop (?))

 

Looking at buying a pair of skis

 

the following is the skis I have researched 

 

 

K2 A.M.P. Force

K2 A.M.P. Photon

Rossignol AVENGER 74

SOLOMON X-WING -4

 

I am leaning towards the K2 A.M.P Force 163

 

I want to make sure I get a ski I will not outgrow in a few years

 

I will only be skiing about 5 times a season.  

 

Costs of skis must be considered (< $350).  

 

All my skiing (in the foreseeable future) will be on groomed snow.

 

Location-   Near DC

 

I appreciate any help

 

-Thanks

 

 

post #2 of 23

The first question that comes up, are you set for boots? If not, get your boots dialed in first and foremost. In the skis you selected, the Rossi & Salomon due to their traditional camber will be the better hard snow errr ICE performers and the two K2's with their early rise will be the easier skis to ski. 

post #3 of 23
Boots boots boots! Listen to Philpug. Chances are you've been renting boots that are at least a size too big. Rent skis until you own well-fitted boots that will actually transmit your instructions to the ski.

The "Ask the Boot Guys" forum has links to lists of qualified boot fitters, and if there's no one listed in your area the boot fitters can recommend someone.
post #4 of 23
Thread Starter 

yes I also plan on buying boots,  The biggest factor here is fit?  Or are there more important factors to consider?

 

As for boot fitters,  do they just charge you a fee to find your boot size?  Or are they looking to just sell you boots?

post #5 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

The first question that comes up, are you set for boots? If not, get your boots dialed in first and foremost. In the skis you selected, the Rossi & Salomon due to their traditional camber will be the better hard snow errr ICE performers and the two K2's with their early rise will be the easier skis to ski. 



So if  I am skiing mostly near DC,  Should I buy for "ice" Conditions?

post #6 of 23

After you get squared away on boots, check out the Blizzard Magnum 7.6 for the conditions you have described ,this ski will do very nicely. Nice and light,very lively with solid edge grip. Also very forgiving for your said ability,nice ski to grow with.  163 should suffice(I ski this in the same size and am exactly the same Ht and Wt as yourself. If you have any other Q's about this ski feel free to ask.  Philpug may have a pair with your name on them.  That is my opinion on the matter,  cheers,    Dave

post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fathom View Post

yes I also plan on buying boots,  The biggest factor here is fit?  Or are there more important factors to consider?

 

As for boot fitters,  do they just charge you a fee to find your boot size?  Or are they looking to just sell you boots?


Fit is the biggest thing--once you've determined what kind of boot you need, which as I understand it is related to your skiing style. Check out this glossary for an idea of what that means. But performance is just one side of a good fit--the other is not having painful and cold feet, which can make a good ski go to hell fast.

Bootfitters typically work at ski shops. Don't go to a big-box store, and don't rely on a salesman or saleswoman for recommendation. The fitter helps you select and fit a boot. I imagine they get a commission, but a decent shop will guarantee a fit (I bought mine at a Masterfit shop which guarantees the fit for the life of the boot), so they have a big incentive to sell you something that will work.

Edit: the glossary doesn't define flex, which isn't surprising, since there's no industry-wide standard for it, and it refers to a couple of things. Usually it refers to how much the cuff leans forward when you bend your ankle and put weight on it.
post #8 of 23

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Daveski7 View Post

After you get squared away on boots, check out the Blizzard Magnum 7.6 for the conditions you have described ,this ski will do very nicely. Nice and light,very lively with solid edge grip. Also very forgiving for your said ability,nice ski to grow with.  163 should suffice(I ski this in the same size and am exactly the same Ht and Wt as yourself. If you have any other Q's about this ski feel free to ask.  Philpug may have a pair with your name on them.  That is my opinion on the matter,  cheers,    Dave

 

Actually I don't. The 7.6 or even the 7.4 would be a great option. 
 

 

post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the advice,  

Looking into this information now.

 

the 7.6 skis are a little high for my budget, but maybe I can find a used pair.  

 

As for the boots, I am seeing a lot of boots for over $200.  Is this the type/price of boot I should be looking to buy?  Are sub $100 boots bad, and not worth the money?

post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fathom View Post

So if  I am skiing mostly near DC,  Should I buy for "ice" Conditions?

Yep. Actually, you should buy for variable conditions that (assume) includes man-made sugar, ice, slush in the spring, bumps. But in all honesty, the boots, some lessons, and some hours on the slopes practicing same will have more impact than the specific model of ski you buy. Also, if you're athletic, planning to get better, don't assume you need a "beginner" ski. The Avenger 74 or 76 Carbon, for instance, will have more upside than the 74 composite, and not be significantly tougher to ski. The Salomon X-Wave 6 or 8 might be a better choice than the 4 for the same reasons. If you like a livelier feel, the Blizzard Magnum 7.4 or Cross are also appropriate skis. Suggest you look at the reviews on Real Skiers, they do a nice job of evaluating a bunch of late-beginner to early advanced skis. 

post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fathom View Post

Thanks for the advice,  

Looking into this information now.

 

the 7.6 skis are a little high for my budget, but maybe I can find a used pair.  

 

As for the boots, I am seeing a lot of boots for over $200.  Is this the type/price of boot I should be looking to buy?  Are sub $100 boots bad, and not worth the money?

If your budget is say $800.00 for a ski package, spend/invest (at least) half on the boots. I will now add some of my little cliches....

 

You date your skis, you marry your boots...

 

Skis are the fun and sexy thing to buy, boots are the important piece of gear....

 

You will go though 2-3 pair of skis for every pair of boots...

 

You will get more performance with a better boot and a lesser ski than a better ski and a lesser boot...

 

What does that all mean? Boots are more important than skis. Period. Remember too, that you are only a beginner once, you WILL improve (especially with better (fitting) boots). I would dare to suggest spending near your whole budget on boots and doing a seasonal lease/rental for the skis and putting off the ski PURCHASE until either the end of next season or the following year. At that point, you will be able to invest in a ski that you can get 2-3 seasons out of where a dead beginner ski will only hold you now for a season...maybe two and with a lesser boot, you will be replacing that sooner too. 

 

I can refer you to a couple of better boot fitters in the Philly area but I don't know of any in the D.C. region, maybe someone can chime in with a suggestion though. 

 


 

 

post #12 of 23
Thread Starter 

As with all novices, I would of thought the Ski was most important.  However I don't ever remember the boots hurting from the skis,  just my feet hurting from the boots.  

 

Seems to be a boot fitter in DC at Ski Center  (Skicenter.com)  

 

@Beyond,  I think Your right, I should look more into a low intermediate ski

 

 

Thanks for all the help!

post #13 of 23
Thread Starter 

last question, If I am only skiing 5 to 6 times a year,  How many years would the boots last?  (I usually take good care of my things)

post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fathom View Post

As with all novices, I would of thought the Ski was most important.  However I don't ever remember the boots hurting from the skis,  just my feet hurting from the boots.  

 

Seems to be a boot fitter in DC at Ski Center  (Skicenter.com)  

 

@Beyond,  I think Your right, I should look more into a low intermediate ski

 

 

Thanks for all the help!

I LIKE that!!!!! and I am going to steal it and and add it to my cliches. beercheer.gif

 

hmm... "When was the last time you heard someone complaining about having their feet hurt from having the wrong skis?"

 

 

@ 5-6 days a year..a boot will last you as long as you want it to until you have progressed passed it's performance level...could be 4-5 years...could be 10. 
 

 

post #15 of 23
Thread Starter 

Thanks a lot everyone this has been super helpful!

 

And by all means steal away,  You did word it better!

post #16 of 23


If as you said you protect your boots, and generally take care of them, i would say easily 5-10 years at that usage rate. The guy who fit my last boots was saying he had been wearing his boots over 200 days so far. Of course as you improve you may want a better boot too, but won't touch that marry the boot, date the ski analogy re: trading up (which is worth stealing).  Lots of folks use cat tracks or other like products to protect their soles. See image below.  One tweak i will make, that was recommended on epic, is to run a loop of 550 cord through the heel pull piece to provide a better grip.  

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fathom View Post

last question, If I am only skiing 5 to 6 times a year,  How many years would the boots last?  (I usually take good care of my things)


CatTracksLG.jpg
 

 

post #17 of 23

Okay, by 5 or 6 times a year, do you mean 5 or 6 days? Or 5 or 6 long weekends, or 5 or 6 weeks?

 

Have you had lessons? Will you have lessons?

 

I dunno...I kinda fell out of my chair at the "under $100" for boots thing. I'm a re-beginner, but after 30 days this season on my

very nice Head Edge boots, I have completely outgrown them skill-wise. While I didn't spend a jillion bucks on them, I think

a decent boot and the skills of a damn fine bootfitter brought me close to the $500 all-in.

 

I need new boots to get better, and that's all there is to it. Most people do.

And I think that learning to ski in an advanced boot is pretty much impossible.

 

Bootfitters do waaaaaaaay more than find your size. Take a look at their little corner over here and see how complicated

good fitting can get.

 

My 2¢ is to spend dang near all your money on boots and find some nice skis a couple of seasons old.

 

I think you may find that with good boots you'll be able to ski down those single blacks, not just get down them.

 

Oh, and where do you actually ski?

 

Cheers!

 

Alli

post #18 of 23

Good call - this seems so obvious yet I haven't done it.  Getting those things back on at the end of the day when your hands may be a little tired from holding poles all day can be tough.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by job151 View Post

One tweak i will make, that was recommended on epic, is to run a loop of 550 cord through the heel pull piece to provide a better grip.  

 

 



 

post #19 of 23
Thread Starter 

5 to 6 days of skiing  8 hr strips,  Most sking would be Near DC,  massanutten,  Ski liberty ect.

 

I don't plan on having any kind of lessons.

 

I don't need to become really really good,  just want to ski and have fun with it.

post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fathom View Post

5 to 6 days of skiing  8 hr strips,  Most sking would be Near DC,  massanutten,  Ski liberty ect.

 

I don't plan on having any kind of lessons.

 

I don't need to become really really good,  just want to ski and have fun with it.


Boy, are you are tossing up softballs for us.... LOL wink.gif. Then you should take a few lessons. You will be amazed how much more fun you will have doing it right. Look up TheRusty here on Epic, he is an instructor at Whitetail...hint he likes beer. beercheer.gif

 

post #21 of 23

No lessons???

 

Oh boy.

 

I am a very firm believer that learning to ski is not a Do It Yourself project.

 

I'm asking this in a genuine way....if you're only going to ski a few days a year,

but won't take lessons, why bother skiing?

 

OTOH, if you're really athletic and have the balance of a cat, then the point is moot.

 

Sliding down an easy blue isn't skiing, it's kinda sledding on sticks.

Only way more dangerous.

 

A good instructor can change your life. There is no way on this god's green earth

I could have gotten to my level as fast as I did (if at all!) without the help of some

awesome instructors.

 

And then the only way to get better is mileage.

 

Yet, we all get out on the snow for different reasons. Why do you want to ski?

What motivates you to be out there?

 

Cheers,

 

Alli

post #22 of 23
Thread Starter 

I suppose I have never been a big fan of lessons,  really don't like the personalized attention. 

 

When I get my setup, and ski a time or two,  I might get a lesson or two.  To fix what I am doing wrong,

post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fathom View Post

I suppose I have never been a big fan of lessons,  really don't like the personalized attention. 

 

When I get my setup, and ski a time or two,  I might get a lesson or two.  To fix what I am doing wrong,


Don't wait too long.  My first lesson was my first day.  My second lesson was day 24 and we spent the entire lesson working on breaking bad habits I had developed.  I thought I was doing great on my own since I could make it down just about anything at that point.  I took that lesson because I thought I needed some tips to take it to the next level.  What I had was a bag of tricks preventing me from taking it to the next level.

 

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