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Chris Fellows "Total Skiing" book -- anyone read it yet? - Page 2

post #31 of 59
My wife grew up in Orange and lived in Athol and knows of you. We live in Hubbardston now. Ski at Berkshire East mostly.
post #32 of 59

Don't worry SMJ, I will come over and help you out. We'll get you back into shape before you know it and it will be time to click in and go skiing again. Looking forward to it, give me a shout.    Dave

post #33 of 59

You are kidding, what is your wife's name.  I worked at Berkshire East in the 80's.

post #34 of 59

 

Highly recommend reading Total Skiing!

 

I’ve read Total Skiing twice and currently reference it often ( during dryland training) along with Ultimate Skiing in my opinion both books go hand in hand, Ultimate Skiing has the technique how’s and whys. But Total Skiing focuses on "you" and "your" body it digs deeper and farther than just ski technique. The best technique, alignment, and equipment means nothing if “you” are not at “your” best! Your skies don’t turn very well without “you!”

 

Think about it this way: Assuming everyone has the ability to achieve an overall functional range of motion of 36 inches, but you can only using 6 inches 1/6th of your potential all because of your lack of flexibility and or strength? How effective will you be even using the best technique, alignment, or equipment? I’m sure all skiers: recreational, instructors, and professionals alike can all improve their strength and flexibility.  Not to mention minimizing your chances of injury and improving your recovery time if you do get injured.

 

If you’ve ever watched an interview with Lindsey Vonn when she’s skiing well she always says “I’m driving my outside well today.” In order to drive the outside ski she has to use internal forces that work against an anchor point aka: her bodies’ muscles. Total Skiing breaks it down so you know what exercises you should be doing in-order to achieve your potential by improving your ability.

 

While you’re read Total Skiing ask yourself what are my weaknesses and terrain challenges?  Be sure to do all the task and exercises. Photos show you the correct way to do the exercises and the benefits you'll gain based on the type of turn or tactic in your skiing. I’ll guarantee you find weakness either in strength, flexibility, or both. I did!

 

There is no better time than NOW to start training for next season.

post #35 of 59

I plan on buying the book for sure!  I have visited the NASTC website many times and have added some great ski tips to my bag of tricks from Chris!  His "Big Toe" exercise is my all time favorite!  I really like Chris' teaching style and explanations.  Simple and to the point!  (K.I.S.S.) and most importantly, keeps it fun!

post #36 of 59

OK - that's it. I am buying the book.

post #37 of 59

Order placed -- can't wait to get it!

post #38 of 59

I just ordered mine too!  yahoo.gif

 

I'd be happy to submit a review when I'm done reading it!

 

post #39 of 59

I like when I can get books autographed, but I bought it through Amazon. I purchased Weem's book and he signed it for me. smile.gif

post #40 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by MidwestPete View Post

I like when I can get books autographed, but I bought it through Amazon. I purchased Weem's book and he signed it for me. smile.gif



Should have let me know...we have autographed copies here.

post #41 of 59

Down loaded to my Kindle this morning and read through it quickly focused more on the Functional Movements. I'll post the results of the test after I take it.eek.gif

post #42 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post





Should have let me know...we have autographed copies here.


Which, I believe, Phil pointed out earlier in the thread.  

biggrin.gif

 

 

post #43 of 59

Darn!!! Day late, dollar short!  Would have loved to get an autographed one!

 

post #44 of 59

Thanks Snowmiser!

 

I think you will like it.  If you have any questions let me know.  The crux is diving into the screens, functional movement first, then fitness, and finally technique and tactics.  You will have to be on snow to asses the technique and tactics.  Enjoy. 

 

 

post #45 of 59

Since the EpicSki Gathering is going to be at Tahoe in February 2012, perhaps we can get Chris to show up and sign your books for you if you bring them.

 

Just a thought......cool.gif

 

Yes,  I occasionally get a thought.....but don't let it get out!

 

post #46 of 59

I would be happy to sign books.

post #47 of 59

Dang it!  At least I should have it within a couple days from Amazon -- they are super fast.

post #48 of 59

Great book Chris!  I really like how you correlate the dry-land exercises with the on-hill exercises.  Your explanations of the fundamental movements are clear and concise and easily understandable.  I discovered a few years ago both the importance of custom boot fitting and a good fitness routine and how much they can improve your skiing.  They were both equally important when I was training for my Level 3 certification.  I know that they helped bring my skiing to a much higher level than I had without them.

 

I've been working with candidates who are seeking higher certification levels and this book and your Performance Pyramid will be of great help for them to achieve the functional movements, fitness levels,  techniques and tactics that will help to get them there.  The whole premise that if you can't do a functional movement in the lodge, then you aren't going to be able to do it sliding down the hill is something that I've been noticing myself, and the assessment exercises that you offer will really help me to help my students reach their goals.

 

Nice work!!!!  It's exactly what I was looking for!

 

Cheers!

 

~Anne Mattack~


Edited by Snowmiser - 6/21/11 at 10:31am
post #49 of 59

OK.  I'm currently reading Ski Faster by Lisa Fienberg Densmore and will get on board with this directly after.  So far, sounds like it's just what I need.

 

post #50 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

OK.  I'm currently reading Ski Faster by Lisa Fienberg Densmore and will get on board with this directly after.  So far, sounds like it's just what I need.

 


So I finally got the book and started reading it.  I'm only on page 4 and had to put it down twice.  Not because I don't like it, but because the words he said caused me to pause, think and realize - "These are the very things I've been trying to figure out."  The importance of all of this isn't necessarily new, but having the means to analyze whether there is a limit to ROM, fitness level, alignment or gear, can fast forward you through years of trial and error.

 

"It is about learning the ways of the mountain and how to survive letting go."  Top of page 4.  That was the first time I paused and contemplated his words.  So many thoughts ran through my head.  Do I "let go" and ski offensively; yes.  Do I always do that?  Uh uh. 

 

So often we use similar terms; offensive, intent, don't hold back etc.  Letting go and the trust that goes with it is what will probably be the thing I will hold with me this season.  I have much to learn this season; bumps included, and remembering Letting Go will be my mantra.

 

Its funny how you can hear even the same words and it won't mean much to you, and then one day you're inside hoping someone will come by and cut up the two cords of wood waiting on you and your chainsaw, while you're reading the new book that Amazon delivered yesterday, and blamo!  One little sentence hit you so hard that you end up writing several to describe it.

 

I'm only a couple paragraphs in and it already paid for itself.

 

Thanks Chris,

 

Ken

 

 

post #51 of 59
Thread Starter 

Can you do a one-legged squat? In the "Functional Movement Testing" section of this book, the second test is a single-leg squat. The author states that "You should be able to move fluidly through your hips and to explode off one leg as all your joints synchronize and provide maximum alignment for takeoff." To perform this squat you are supposed to bring your thigh parallel to the floor.

 

I was planning on skimming through the book entirely before actually trying anything, but this test got me curious because I have never been able to do a single-leg squat. The "scoring" for this test is based mostly on alignment rather than the ability to actually perform the exercise. You are supposed to score a "0" if there is too much pain to perform it, but there is never any discussion about having the muscle strength to perform it. It seems to be assumed that everyone can do a single-leg squat. So I decided to try it. I wasn't even close to be able to do it. With the author's apparent assumption that everyone should be able to do this and "explode off one leg" I was definitely feeling inadequate.

 

I then decided to ask my brother to try the exercise. He is more fit than about 99% of the population. He is a natural athlete (unlike myself). He competes in triathlons and does very well. He trains a couple hours every day. However, he also was unable to successfully complete a single one-legged squat as described in this book. My brother is 6'3" and I am 6'5" tall. My wife, who is 5'4" tall and has an athletic build but is not anywhere near as fit or as strong as my brother also tried the single-leg squat. She can do it.

 

Here's my theory:  This exercise becomes increasingly difficult as height increases. When I think about it logically it makes sense how height would affect one's ability with this exercise. My problem with this is that the author did not address this at all and seems to assume that everyone should be able to do this exercise. I don't want to throw out the baby with the bath water, but I now wonder how much of this book will be applicable to me. Is my main weakness my height? Am I too tall to be a good skier? Unfortunately I can't do anything about my height. I was initially hoping this book would help me become a better skier by explaining to me how I should adapt different skiing techniques to account for my weaknesses. Granted, this was a misunderstanding of the book. I now understand how the book is really about identifying your weaknesses and performing certain exercises to improve in those areas. However, the book seems to be trying to help everyone get to the same goal of physical ability -- and this is just not going to happen for me.

post #52 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by TallSkinnyGuy View Post

Can you do a one-legged squat? In the "Functional Movement Testing" section of this book, the second test is a single-leg squat. The author states that "You should be able to move fluidly through your hips and to explode off one leg as all your joints synchronize and provide maximum alignment for takeoff." To perform this squat you are supposed to bring your thigh parallel to the floor.

 

I was planning on skimming through the book entirely before actually trying anything, but this test got me curious because I have never been able to do a single-leg squat. The "scoring" for this test is based mostly on alignment rather than the ability to actually perform the exercise. You are supposed to score a "0" if there is too much pain to perform it, but there is never any discussion about having the muscle strength to perform it. It seems to be assumed that everyone can do a single-leg squat. So I decided to try it. I wasn't even close to be able to do it. With the author's apparent assumption that everyone should be able to do this and "explode off one leg" I was definitely feeling inadequate.

 

I then decided to ask my brother to try the exercise. He is more fit than about 99% of the population. He is a natural athlete (unlike myself). He competes in triathlons and does very well. He trains a couple hours every day. However, he also was unable to successfully complete a single one-legged squat as described in this book. My brother is 6'3" and I am 6'5" tall. My wife, who is 5'4" tall and has an athletic build but is not anywhere near as fit or as strong as my brother also tried the single-leg squat. She can do it.

 

Here's my theory:  This exercise becomes increasingly difficult as height increases. When I think about it logically it makes sense how height would affect one's ability with this exercise. My problem with this is that the author did not address this at all and seems to assume that everyone should be able to do this exercise. I don't want to throw out the baby with the bath water, but I now wonder how much of this book will be applicable to me. Is my main weakness my height? Am I too tall to be a good skier? Unfortunately I can't do anything about my height. I was initially hoping this book would help me become a better skier by explaining to me how I should adapt different skiing techniques to account for my weaknesses. Granted, this was a misunderstanding of the book. I now understand how the book is really about identifying your weaknesses and performing certain exercises to improve in those areas. However, the book seems to be trying to help everyone get to the same goal of physical ability -- and this is just not going to happen for me.


I can do one legged squats as described in the book but I currently am not doing them with the "explode" to the other leg.  I'm still in physical therapy and I'm not doing any open chained exercises that will put that much stress on my knee until the PT says it's OK.

 

Don NOT confuse "fit" for not having an issue.  Running, swimming and cycling can be easily compensated for, just like skiing.

 

I've been short most of my life (didn't happen until 6th grade), 5'7".  I spent a good chunk of my life in the Marines listening to people state they couldn't do something because of their size.  Usually it was dead hang pull ups.  How they were at a disadvantage because they were so big and I had it easier because I was smaller.  Each and every time I proved them wrong and how I was the disadvantaged one; especially once we put our gear on -  Marine Corps only makes one size - too heavy.

 

Anyway, I would bet that you and your brother have the same or similar issue and your wife doesn't.  Is your alignment, foot structure and ROM the same as your wife's?

 

I don't see how the exercise could become increasingly difficult with height unless something else became increasingly apparent like a structural issue and not a muscle issue (i.e. legs not symmetrical, bow legged etc).

 

The point of the test is to bring to light foundation issues.  Looks like you and your brother made the first step to becoming better athletes.

 

ShortChubbyGuy (aka Ken)

post #53 of 59
Thread Starter 

Quote:

Anyway, I would bet that you and your brother have the same or similar issue and your wife doesn't.  Is your alignment, foot structure and ROM the same as your wife's?

 

I don't see how the exercise could become increasingly difficult with height unless something else became increasingly apparent like a structural issue and not a muscle issue (i.e. legs not symmetrical, bow legged etc).

 

The point of the test is to bring to light foundation issues.  Looks like you and your brother made the first step to becoming better athletes.

 

While I am open to this possibility, I don't buy it yet. I am not a physics expert, but it makes sense to me that certain body types have advantages with certain physical activities. I believe this is why most of the athletes in a single discipline in the Olympics tend to have very similar body structures. I've heard all my life from guys who were shorter than average that if they were as tall as me they could dunk a basketball so easily. That would be true if they maintained their vertical leap as they got taller. But I have read that the average vertical leap ability diminishes significantly as height increases. I believe I do have advantages in certain sports and that I have disadvantages in other sports due to my height. It doesn't mean that I can't improve or enjoy the sport, but I am concerned that a book that doesn't take into account my certain physical disadvantages may not help me as much as it could someone who better fits the target physical profile.
 

 

post #54 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by TallSkinnyGuy View Post

 

While I am open to this possibility, I don't buy it yet. I am not a physics expert, but it makes sense to me that certain body types have advantages with certain physical activities. I believe this is why most of the athletes in a single discipline in the Olympics tend to have very similar body structures. I've heard all my life from guys who were shorter than average that if they were as tall as me they could dunk a basketball so easily. That would be true if they maintained their vertical leap as they got taller. But I have read that the average vertical leap ability diminishes significantly as height increases. I believe I do have advantages in certain sports and that I have disadvantages in other sports due to my height. It doesn't mean that I can't improve or enjoy the sport, but I am concerned that a book that doesn't take into account my certain physical disadvantages may not help me as much as it could someone who better fits the target physical profile.
 

 



Fair enough.  I guess we'll have to read the whole thing, do what it recommends and then we'll know.

 

 

post #55 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Fellows View Post
 

Don't get too overwhelmed, not every exercise and drill will be part of your specific program.  The screens will help guide you to the sets of drills that you most need to work on.  I recommend reading part 1 of the book and then focus just on the functional movement screens and exercises prescribed.  Once you understand the performance pyramid, it is easier to follow the suggestions.  This is actually a good time of year to be looking at base movements and participating in active rest from a long ski season.  I am happy to answer any questions you have.

Chris   

This advice from Chris is important to remember.  One advantage of reading Total Skiing at the start of the off season is that it's easy to focus on the off-slope aspects without getting too ambitious about the on-slope drills.  I've enjoyed reading a little at a time because there are brief explanations of how or why a given exercise or drill is helpful for better skiing.

 

While I don't think someone needs to be an advanced skier to appreciate Total Skiing, it helps to have some experience with ski conditioning exercises and/or ski lessons from an instructor at an intermediate level or above.

post #56 of 59

BUMP for those starting to think about what to do in terms of off-season fitness.  Total Skiing is a good book for someone who is serious about improving their skiing since it covers fitness and technique.

post #57 of 59


Hi Chris,

 

Where do I buy your book...I thought I saw it now I cant find it again....was it the one for 19.99 ?

post #58 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guy Anderson View Post
 


Hi Chris,

 

Where do I buy your book...I thought I saw it now I cant find it again....was it the one for 19.99 ?


@Chris Fellows hasn't posted for a while so not sure he'll see you question.

 

In Post #56 I used the hidden link method.  So if you click on the blue "Total Skiing" that will take you to the EpicSki page for the book.  There is a link to Amazon there.  Can get it on Kindle, new, or used.

post #59 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guy Anderson View Post


Hi Chris,

Where do I buy your book...I thought I saw it now I cant find it again....was it the one for 19.99 ?

Go to your favorite online retailers website, enter ' chris fellows total skiing' in their search engine, and you'll be there in about 15 seconds, tops.
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