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The Benefits of Having a One Ski Quiver ? - Page 5

post #121 of 169

I will say the Salomon BBR is as close to a ONE SKI QUIVER ski as I have seen for next season. 

post #122 of 169


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

I got your one ski quiver right here..... K-Tel fun skis, all conditions, one size fits all.....

 

Ktel fun skis 1.jpg

 

Ktel fun skis.jpg


Pfft. You don't have the matching poles ya loser.  

 

SnowCatBox2.jpg?t=1306698494

 

I skied those last year.  Great in the powder, but they are too fat for nonono2.gifhardpack.

 

SnowCatBox.jpg?t=1306698494

 

Note I am skiing a RED diamond!eek.gif

 

SnowCatDad.jpg?t=1306698494

post #123 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

I will say the Salomon BBR is as close to a ONE SKI QUIVER ski as I have seen for next season. 



I think you'd have to have a "ski off" against the K-tell's.........

 

post #124 of 169

A one ski quiver is just easier and cheaper to maintain. Only one ski to store in the off season and one ski to keep tuned. One ski to put in the ski bag, load in the car, carry to the hill....It's just a minimalist vs maximalist (if that's a word) question.

post #125 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

A one ski quiver is just easier and cheaper to maintain. Only one ski to store in the off season and one ski to keep tuned. One ski to put in the ski bag, load in the car, carry to the hill....It's just a Cheapskate vs Glutonist overkill question.

Fixed wink.gif
 

Ski bag in the car versus 7 foot by 4 foot box on top of the car question too.

post #126 of 169

I really appreciated your comments on the issue, as they show valuable personal experience.

I'm a newly born middle-aged ski-noob who will likely buy his first pair of sticks in the upcoming season.

I'm so excited about it that I catch myself going into a daze from all the marketing hype and engineering techno-speak at manufacturers' websites.

I become obsessed with the idea of finding the one perfect ski that will magically solve all issues of balance, technique, and personal skill.

 

<<<Air Horn>>>

 

Thanks.  :)


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post

a lot depends on how good of a skier you are

 

Almost all of them ski something in the mid-70s to 80s as their 1-ski quiver. And they absolutely rock those skis in every condition imaginable. We hit fresh waist deep pow early in the season (December/January) for a clinic and my boss (National Demo Team member) was killing it on some 70-something waisted Nordica racing skis. Another instructor buddy of mine only has the Blizzard Magnum 8.7 in his quiver. . . . and he was killing it on those "skinny" skis in everything we hit that day, which was variable from icy moonscape to windbuff pow to manky 'taters.

 

. . . but if you're really solid with your technique you can get by in any condition, at any mountain, on one ski, regardless of it's width, etc. 

post #127 of 169

For me, the ONLY benefit of having a one ski quiver would be that my wife would stop nagging me with all the usual questions like "Why do you need another pair of skis? Isn't four or five or six pairs of skis enough?" etc, etc. Actually, I think it would be fun to get rid of all but one pair of skis just to see the look of absolute disbelief on her face. But seriously, if I had to choose one ski from my collection to be the "one ski quiver", it would have to be the Dynastar Big Trouble. The BT is what I take along as my back-up ride in the unlikely event (yeah, right!) the conditions I am expecting to find on the mountain don't actually materialize.  

post #128 of 169

There is a point with a quiver where once you reach critical mass any additional skis added to the quiver just fade into the herd.  So if you're having problems with questions from the spouse you clearly have not purchased enough skis. wink.gif

 

Anyhow, it's been my experience more often than not that those skiers with only a pair (or two) are the ones who are lamenting on the chair lift about how they wished they had "such and such" kind of ski.  I have less trouble selecting skis than not having the ski I want.

 

Also, it's rare to find skiers who have the skills to rock a single pair of skis in all conditions on every part of the mountain.  Sure there are instructors and pros out there that can do this, but for most mere mortals having the right pair of sticks that will work with you instead of against you is where you want to be. icon14.gif

post #129 of 169

...


Edited by JayT - 5/31/11 at 9:38am
post #130 of 169

I want to add to my one-ski quiver, but I subscribe to the philosophy that "Nobody gets two until everybody has one," so I want to ensure that my family members are all on their own equipment next season. *Then* I can start demoing those new Blizzards...

post #131 of 169

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by gimmesnow View Post

For me, the ONLY benefit of having a one ski quiver would be that my wife would stop nagging me with all the usual questions like "Why do you need another pair of skis? Isn't four or five or six pairs of skis enough?" 

 

During a shopping excursion I once tried countering that kind of input by observing "Don't you already have a pair of black shoes?"  <-Not recommended.  

post #132 of 169
Quote:

Originally Posted by Noodler View Post
 

 

Also, it's rare to find skiers who have the skills to rock a single pair of skis in all conditions on every part of the mountain.  Sure there are instructors and pros out there that can do this, but for most mere mortals having the right pair of sticks that will work with you instead of against you is where you want to be. icon14.gif


Perhaps, but I also think it's rare to find skiers who even really care to ski all conditions on every part of the mountain. Most people I know (aside from the weirdos around here wink.gif ) are perfectly content to stick to the groomed snow while skiing in mild weather conditions. They don't  want bumps, they don't want crud,  they don't want ice, they don't even want more than 6 inches of powder. Of course, here in CO, it's pretty easy to be an avid skier and ski pretty similar conditions all the time, as our extremes aren't very extreme. 

 

post #133 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler View Post

 

Also, it's rare to find skiers who have the skills to rock a single pair of skis in all conditions on every part of the mountain.  Sure there are instructors and pros out there that can do this, but for most mere mortals having the right pair of sticks that will work with you instead of against you is where you want to be. icon14.gif



Well yeah, it's not just a skill thing.  It's a "why" thing. 

 

Like why would I want to be on a set of carving skis when there's 2' of fresh on the hill?  Personal preference, that's why!  Some people like it.  I personally like wider skis.  I dunno, maybe it's because I primarily ski on a natural snow mountain and there's shark teeth under there so I want to stay somewhere in the snowpack and not submarine straight to bedrock where the core shots live...  But it's the different experiences each ski can deliver that makes having a quiver truly fun imho.  Sure it's not wholly necessary, as I'm 100% positive I could make either of my two "skinnier" skis work all year, but why?  I want to float and swivel and float like I'm in a cloud when the pow is right, and I want predictable powerful turns on hardpack...  To each his own for sure, but I get annoyed on here often as people seem to be uber smug about using carvers everywhere- and to me that's "compensating" more than pulling out a big fat hairy pow ski on a big fat hairy pow day, as if it made them more hardcore or skilled or deserving of praise/admiration- I call it the "tele effect"- where the user assumes everyone cares what they're on and why.  Of course the opposite can be true as well and I hate painting stereotypes...  But most instructors I know are super intrigued when you ride the chair with them wearing something huge, then ski down with them on a pow day and they see how it can change the experience.  That and real gear whores simply cannot look at a new shape and NOT wonder what it's like in bottomless cold smoke, etc...  I'm blessed to be able to buy 1-2 pairs of skis per year and love supporting the advancement of ski technology/indie manufacturers as well as exercising my right to choose and dial in my experience with not only a ski quiver but a boot quiver too.  My Virus Tours are a world apart from my Lange FR130s and I like having the option to wear either.  Variety is the spice of life you know smile.gif  BTW, if there are any EC skiers that would like to try either a PM Gear 183 Carbon FAT BRO or 185 Praxis Pow + this year, let me know, as love it or hate it I'd be psyched to open you up to a new experience icon14.gif

 

 

I know plenty of amazing skiers who love having options, and I certainly don't think less of them for having a big quiver.  Some are more comfortable with one option and one experience, and good for them for knowing how to enjoy themselves, I'll never hate on them for having a good time- after all, the skier with the biggest smile is the best skier on the hill in my humblest of opinions wink.gif  

post #134 of 169

As long as your skiing it really doesn't matter how many skis you have,as long as there's at least 2. I like having a "few" pairs of skis. Changing boards during the day keeps it entertaining. Skiers like to inquire about new big skis. Just don't ask them what their waist mm is or TR,most don't know.

post #135 of 169

Come to think of it, it was the quest for the mystical "One Ski Quiver" that led me to acquire most of the skis I presently own. I was ga-ga over the incredible, ground-breaking Pocket Rocket when it first appeared back in (insert correct year). I went everywhere on those things. It was my do-absolutely-everything ski for a few seasons, then I began to feel that my perfect one ski quiver should have more beef than the flexy PR, so the Dynastar Big Trouble appeared in the line up. And so on and so on. Maybe I should put up a ski rack in my storeroom where each space in the rack has a sign that reads something like "One Ski Quiver - 2003", "One Ski Quiver - 2004" etc, etc.

post #136 of 169
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Come to think of it, it was the quest for the mystical "One Ski Quiver" that led me to acquire most of the skis I presently own.

....now that you mention it, how many new ski's are advertised as being capable of a 'one ski quiver'.  Most skis up to 105mm waist now advertise that they're great for powder, crud, frontside, backside and with enough edge grip to ski well on hard pack - take a look at manufacturers descriptions of their 2012 line up.

post #137 of 169

Segbrown, did you really say that about people only wanting to ski groomers and ski the same part of the mountain all the time?  Are you kidding?  I have three pairs so I can ski all over in all kinds of conditions and I don't think that is very many.  My goodness, what fun is it to stay on the groomers!  

post #138 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiAddictVA View Post

Segbrown, did you really say that about people only wanting to ski groomers and ski the same part of the mountain all the time?  



Shocking, isn't it!! :-)

post #139 of 169

That's surprisingly accurate, it really has become the goal of many of the manufacturers to make them all One Ski Quivers (at least tell us they are) with certain obvious exceptions. As I stated earlier, I am on 2010 K2 Coombas, and very much in love with them, they were the only ski I was on all year, with my love of many older skis fading. However reading this post has me wanting a dedicated carver!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ILOJ View Post

 

....now that you mention it, how many new ski's are advertised as being capable of a 'one ski quiver'.  Most skis up to 105mm waist now advertise that they're great for powder, crud, frontside, backside and with enough edge grip to ski well on hard pack - take a look at manufacturers descriptions of their 2012 line up.



 

post #140 of 169

Nearly any ski is capable of serving as a one ski quiver. Its the skier not the ski. That said, there are designs that are much better than others in certain conditions.

 

If the snow is hard and icy and groomers are the best option and all I have under foot is a spat then I'm going to be wishing I have a race stock SL or GS ski for sures! And if its 2 feet of heavy pow and I'm on a 165cm race stock SL ski I'm gonna be wishin' I have a spat. Get the picture???

post #141 of 169

Sounds like a lot of you here actually have quivers but really the skis are still orientated for the one condition that you ski on over 50% of the time so does that make that ski your OSQ anyway when you think how often it's used?

Don't take this the wrong way, but I wonder why you'd choose to ski on fatter skis as the do all and end all as some people as stated on here that say they have quivers, when they have another narrower set to use when it's firm underfoot? I really wonder if it's just because they are easier to manage, whilst sacrificing some feel overall, but it's an acceptable compromise.

I mean everyone gets older and is this really just a sign of "it's just easier and i've forgotten a little bit what I'm potentially missing so..." ?

Personally I can see the benefits of wider skis in the right situations sure, but I can't get the feeling and fighter pilot like returns out of wider skis on firmer snow (even with 2 inches of fresh as well) that I can on a narrower waisted ski around 75-80mm?

It just deosn't feel as connected to me, so yes to a OSQ for 85% of terrian/people, but I think you should miss and try and find that 10% extra sometimes, especially if your OSQ is getting over 90mm. Unless you only ski powder of course, unlucky for some ;-)

 

post #142 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiatansky View Post

Nearly any ski is capable of serving as a one ski quiver. Its the skier not the ski. That said, there are designs that are much better than others in certain conditions.

 

If the snow is hard and icy and groomers are the best option and all I have under foot is a spat then I'm going to be wishing I have a race stock SL or GS ski for sures! And if its 2 feet of heavy pow and I'm on a 165cm race stock SL ski I'm gonna be wishin' I have a spat. Get the picture???

QTF.

I had a one ski quiver for a few years, a SG ski.  I could and did ski it everywhere skiing was allowed.  It's not that there were places or conditions where it could not be skied; it's that there were certain things it could not, and still will not do there, like carve RR tracks with a 5 m radius on hardpack or  even bend into a nice turn-conforming shape in soft snow, despite having writing n on it in three languages that it was for both short and long turns. When I wasn't broke, I preferred to rent a softer ski for powder.


 

 

post #143 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiatansky View Post

Nearly any ski is capable of serving as a one ski quiver. Its the skier not the ski. That said, there are designs that are much better than others in certain conditions.

 

 



Yes, this is the basic feeling I have.  A good skier can make anything work everywhere, and what exactly people are looking for in their one ski quiver can differ vastly from one skier to another.  I mean hell, I now a guy who rides ARGs for about 90% of his season and loves them- and that's on the east coast!  I would never want that but hey, he's happy so who cares?  He's a pow stash searcher and he would endure bad hard snow control all day for two seconds of floatin' and boatin'.   

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by snala View Post

 

Don't take this the wrong way, but I wonder why you'd choose to ski on fatter skis as the do all and end all as some people as stated on here that say they have quivers, when they have another narrower set to use when it's firm underfoot? I really wonder if it's just because they are easier to manage, whilst sacrificing some feel overall, but it's an acceptable compromise.

 

Personally I can see the benefits of wider skis in the right situations sure, but I can't get the feeling and fighter pilot like returns out of wider skis on firmer snow (even with 2 inches of fresh as well) that I can on a narrower waisted ski around 75-80mm?

 



I wouldn't take that the wrong way- you're asking a very simple, and good question imo.  The first part of the question relates to the type of ski you're choosing- not every "fat" ski is a noodle.  In fact one of the best, most stable and powerful skis I've ever been on was a 183 Euro BRO @ 100mm underfoot.  With a full wood core, 33m radius and a rearward mounting point, they are MISSILES.  I could go full out on them, and never feel once like they were getting nervous, shaky or like my edge grip was compromised.  In comparison to say, a supershape magnum- which is probably my fav all over carving ski- it just feels so much more solid and stable at speed.  The last time I went to Sunday River (groomerville USA) with a crew, all my friends brought carvers and none could keep up once it got fast- more ski just has more stability when there's more speed.  Think of driving on the highway- a carving ski would be more like a vette and the 183 bros would be more of a bentley.  While the carvers are more nimble, the fatter skis- while weighing in around the same- have the more planted, stable ride at high speeds.  Sometimes going from a big fat ski to a carver it feels nervous at speed.  So if you're looking to make high speed GS tuns on an open face, I'd reach for the BROs before the supershapes personally but if I'm billygoating down exposed steeps or bumps, I might choose the skinnier, more nimble ski (if there's not a lot of new snow)...  So in summary, it's more of the TYPE of fat ski you're choosing- there are many charging skis out there that slay at speed.  But that's just my .02, someone else may have a different experience and opinion about how it makes them feel.      

 

 

As for the second part, if you're not getting the fighter pilot feel you've just probably been using the wrong ski for what you're doing or trying to do.  Buying a traditionally cambered/sidecut ski with a full aspen core will give you a different feel than a bamboo core.  Moment's camber profile will differ significantly from say a PM Gear ski.  It's all in figuring out what you want to do before you choose a ski to bring you there.  Try out a stiffer traditional fat ski if you like making big, fast, stable turns and you've been let down in the past.  You might just be pleasantly surprised!      

post #144 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiatansky View Post

Nearly any ski is capable of serving as a one ski quiver. Its the skier not the ski. That said, there are designs that are much better than others in certain conditions.

 

If the snow is hard and icy and groomers are the best option and all I have under foot is a spat then I'm going to be wishing I have a race stock SL or GS ski for sures! And if its 2 feet of heavy pow and I'm on a 165cm race stock SL ski I'm gonna be wishin' I have a spat. Get the picture???

Absolutely, and  anybody could play a round of golf using only one club.  I've known quite a few very good players that typically play using only three or four of the clubs in their bags but still carry as many as they can just in case. 
 

 

post #145 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy View Post



 


I had two one ski quivers, now I have three.

 

The basement one ski quiver, Atomic Izor 72mm x159 

 

The work one ski quiver, Atomic Crimson 86mm x169,

 

One ski quiver #3, the One 98mm x177.

 



OK, I think dookey67 is on to something here; anyone want to advise me on this quiver? The Izors are probably the first place to make a move, maybe let mrs. jimmy try them out. I'm skiing 50-60 days all but six in the Mid Atlantic, teaching 25-30 days. We get more snow in WV than you'd think, over 200" the last two years so I get to spend a good bit of time off piste skiing natural snow, nothing bottomless but deep sometimes. I'm 5'7 175#. Izors are too short for me now, i haven't skied them at all this season just ended, the Crimson was my everyday ski.

 

What's missing, what would you do if you were in my boots. 

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post

I honestly believe it all depends on 1. how many days a season you ski, 2. where you ski (are you confined to one area or do you travel a ton), and 3. whether or not you are in the snow sports industry.

 

For me, I could get by with 3 skis: 1 for teaching, 1 for every day free skiing away from work, 1 for powder. But then I also enjoy backcountry skiing, so that can potentially add another stick to the quiver.

 

 

post #146 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy View Post





OK, I think dookey67 is on to something here; anyone want to advise me on this quiver? The Izors are probably the first place to make a move, maybe let mrs. jimmy try them out. I'm skiing 50-60 days all but six in the Mid Atlantic, teaching 25-30 days. We get more snow in WV than you'd think, over 200" the last two years so I get to spend a good bit of time off piste skiing natural snow, nothing bottomless but deep sometimes. I'm 5'7 175#. Izors are too short for me now, i haven't skied them at all this season just ended, the Crimson was my everyday ski.

 

What's missing, what would you do if you were in my boots. 

 


 


Um, No!  Mrs Jimmy should get her own skis that she wants and loves.  I can help her with that.......trust me!biggrin.gif

 

As for your quiver, I'd get the Blizzard Magnum 8.1 to compliment the The One, and use one set of bindings for both pair, easy for travel!

 

post #147 of 169



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Do Work
As for the second part, if you're not getting the fighter pilot feel you've just probably been using the wrong ski for what you're doing or trying to do.  Buying a traditionally cambered/sidecut ski with a full aspen core will give you a different feel than a bamboo core.  Moment's camber profile will differ significantly from say a PM Gear ski.  It's all in figuring out what you want to do before you choose a ski to bring you there.  Try out a stiffer traditional fat ski if you like making big, fast, stable turns and you've been let down in the past.  You might just be pleasantly surprised!      



Fair call and a good response. Yes I have to admit my knowledge here is biased towards the S3 type of wide ski which isn't traditional at all but has all the bells and whistles as far as shape technology is concerned and is a far cry from my old SShapes and my Titan's now. I went opposite ends of the spectrum for my two skis in that regard so the crossover was less and both were quite orientated towards one type of snow or the other. Also tried out lots of the 2010/11 medium width carvers in the mid 80's with risers/rocker and normal camber etc and felt they were all pretty good but still 'sitting a bit on the fence as far as what they did very well' if that makes sense as they try to cover a big range of situations but yes agree would actually do it fine for most people. 

Ultimately it depends on how you like to ski too and for me I've skiied more time on the Titans than the S3's in the snow I've had in the last 12 months i.e 2 seasons (winter here 2010 & NA 2011). Even on the good powder days though, they offered more to me in the arvo when it's all chopped up and and they still were adequate in the morning too. Doing deep stuff all day the S3's are definately easier though. I guess it depends if you want to float/swish or edge fly/smash for which proportion of your day. I'm a bit more of a smasher but every now and then an easier float day on the wides is good too.

Sounds a bit silly but after a few days on powder it's nice to actually feel the ground sometimes too, not just on the last run to the base. wink.gif

 


Edited by snala - 6/1/11 at 8:36pm
post #148 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy View Post


What's missing, what would you do if you were in my boots. 

 


Boots!!! YES BOOT QUIVER!!!!!  Good catch jimmy.  I currently have two sets of boots, stiffer carving/race specific and softer bumps and powder oriented.  I have a third set of liners and I'm trolling for another pair of boots..  Also have a pole quiver with baby poles for big bumps and two sets of regular poles..

 

post #149 of 169

Interesting.  I suppose that if you are a relatively skilled skier, you can wring the effectiveness out of different types of skis.  I ski primarily in New Hampshire, or Northern New England, and picked up some Blizzard 8.1 Magnums this year.  The ski is very versatile and skis ice to waist deep powder in Alta/Snowbird, so a ski of this type could be the OSQ.   On the other hand, we had some great powder days in NH this past season, and I skiied 19" of relatively dry powder in January on Volkl Racetigers (about 67mm at waist) which worked just fine.   I've demo'd wider skis with full camber and didn't care for them, but that surely could have been a function of the snow conditions on that specific day.  If I was in deep powder every day, a wide/full camber ski could be great. 

 

I guess one question (perhaps asked or answered or commented on) in these pages is whether the ski is a substitute or supplement to good skiing skills.  I teach with a number of people who, IMO, aren't great technical skiers.   These "types" are generally the ones on a chair ride who bemoan a run by saying "I need my fill in the blank skis (powder/moguls/ice/crud) skis".  Sorry, I just don't think that works.  What are you going to do, go into the locker room or lodge and change your skis every other run?    My mind spins at the thought of multiple boots, unless you are switching disciplines, e.g., telemark, randonee, or alpine. 

 

I think good skiers will ski well on any ski, and different skis will augment their skiing.  Different skis will also help less skilled skiers in more challenging conditions that they may not be well skilled in skiing or if they lack confidence.    If you can get by 90% of the time on one ski, that's great and less confusing. 

 

One of my rules is don't buy a ski until you ski it.  I've had plenty of skis recommended to me that I've then not cared for once skiing them.  So try before you buy.  Skis are like cars, with certain brands, every manufacturer makes great skis, but personal preference will help you choose among some great skis.    Also, using the car metaphor, what are you going to do, go home and change to your rain tires when your driving? 

post #150 of 169



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by GustavView Post

 

One of my rules is don't buy a ski until you ski it.  I've had plenty of skis recommended to me that I've then not cared for once skiing them.  So try before you buy.  Skis are like cars, with certain brands, every manufacturer makes great skis, but personal preference will help you choose among some great skis.    Also, using the car metaphor, what are you going to do, go home and change to your rain tires when your driving? 



Well, you do change between winter tires and performance "non frozen" tires (or should). This is no different than soft snow to firm snow skis. It's simply a better tool for the job. If you don't care then ski whatever makes you happy. I love options. Skied for many years with a 2 ski quiver, SL (200 or 203) and bump (180). For where I was skiing that was all I needed. Now I have way more choices. For me that's FUN. If you don't want to go that route then ski on what works for you....what's the controversy?

 

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