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Alpine Touring ski boots?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

What's the difference between alpine touring ski boots and regular alpine boots? Can you use regular alpine boots on a alpine touring setup?

post #2 of 8

Alpine touring boots have features that make walking and hiking easier and more comfortable:

 

1- Walk mode switch. Even thought some Alpine boots have this, AT boots allow greater for and aft cuff movement

2- Cleated Vibram sole for traction with some "rocker" built in.

 

You can use regular alpine boots to tour in but they won't be as comfortable, actually painful if you try to go far,

post #3 of 8

So I need to replace my setup, basically all of it.  I tried AT boots in demo a few years ago but they were so soft that I couldn't ski at all.  Total mess.  Fine, sure, maybe I suck.  And stiffness is, as I understand it, the enemy of comfortable touring.  

 

So what are the stiffest AT boots out there, ones that are Dynafit compatible?  And where do they rang next to pure alpine?  My boots that I love dearly are Rossi, one notch below the racing model from, um, about 15 years ago.

 

And yes, I'm really hoping to lap the groomers with pals in these, as well as do some day BC trips.

 

 

post #4 of 8

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kvd23 View Post
 
 I tried AT boots in demo a few years ago but they were so soft that I couldn't ski at all. 

 

Not all AT boots are built the same, any more than alpine boots.  

 

Quote:

...So what are the stiffest AT boots out there, ones that are Dynafit compatible?  

 

Technica Cochise, Scarpa Mobe, Dynafit Titan, and Garmont Delierium to name a few.  

 

Quote:

And where do they rang next to pure alpine? 

 

Depends on which pure alpine boots you're comparing them to.  rolleyes.gif  They aren't as stiff as race plug boots, but if you want stiff AT boots that are Dynafit compatible, start with those listed.  

post #5 of 8

when i started shopping for AT boots, i also thought no boot was stiff enough and provided adequate support for my skiing. i even had a nightmare day on a paif of megaride rentals.

 

well, what i did was softening my alpine boots, skiing with rather loose upper cuff buckles, just to find a decently centered ctance that would not require too much boot to lean/press against.

 

i then ended up buying dynafit zzero4s, which were skiable from day one, and a very good fit. concentrate on fit first!! but they took a few days to get used to. they lacked some forward lean, which is now solved since my dnafit binders provide that. i improved their snugness and response quite a bit with a scarpa/intuition liner, actually the one from the maestrale.

 

long story short, real AT boots are made for a different style of skiing. the more you are willing to adapt to that, the more comfort and backcountry readiness you can expect from a boot. in my eyes AT reality is alot less about blasting down, and more about making yor way down. i never haul ass in the backcountry. (remote backcountr, that is)

 

i git so used to my zzeros that i use them for everything now, resort and backcountry. i don't miss a thing. and i appreciate the vibram sole and walk switch in every gondola, in every mountian restaurant and on every ice parking lot.

 

but, as stated before, there are quite a few boots out there now that are AT ready and modeled quite a bit after die hard alpine boots. you might want to try these.

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

 

 

Not all AT boots are built the same, any more than alpine boots.  

 

 

Technica Cochise, Scarpa Mobe, Dynafit Titan, and Garmont Delierium to name a few.  

 

 

Depends on which pure alpine boots you're comparing them to.  rolleyes.gif  They aren't as stiff as race plug boots, but if you want stiff AT boots that are Dynafit compatible, start with those listed.  



Yes, Tecnical Cochise and Dynafit Titans are definately stiffer, but there is a weight price though.

 

post #7 of 8

needs updating but is a place to start http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/showthread.php/78437-AT-Boot-Flex-Comparative-List-by-model

 

take the above w a grain of salt http://www.wildsnow.com/1202/ski-boot-stiffness-flex-ratings/

 

 For me, there's no point in schlepping uphill & then having a squirrelly time on the downhill. I feel like I could hike a zillion miles in my Dynafit Gaia's (equivalent model to ZZZZZeus).

post #8 of 8

I've got around 200 days on my Dynafit Zzeus boots. Mostly inbounds, some BC skiing/hiking. I wear them for teaching, freeskiing, everything. Are they as responsive as a pair of super stiff race boots? No, but that's part of the appeal. The past two days I wore them on the snow from 8:30 til 4:30 and they were comfortable all day. Sometimes teaching I leave them in walk mode to make skating and standing around easier. I had a small problem with the walk/ride mechanism at the end of last season. I contacted Dynafit US and their awesome customer service sorted me out, no questions asked.

 

My next boots will either be another pair of Zzeus/Titans, or Technica Cochise. The Technicas fit me a little better out of the box, but it was a small issue to get the Dynafits stretched a little in the forefoot (I have wide feet).

 

The vibram soles and the walk mode make spending entire days in boots so much more bearable. And now with Marker's new bindings sporting an adjustable height, moving AFD, I can put inexpensive Alpine bindings on the skis that I don't need to tour on.

 

If you're all about maximum performance on the down, then a pure Alpine boot is probably the best answer. But with all the new AT/Alpine options out there, we have a lot of great choices in hybrid AT boots that are sufficiently stiff for 90-95% of us. FWIW, I'm 5'10" and 200lbs. I ski nearly all terrain but don't drop cliffs.

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