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Hiking skis

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi there this seems like a really good forum, good to meet you all.

 

I live in the UK and have snowboarded for the last 9 years but never skied!

 

I'm looking for some skis to use in the UK on the flat and also when out hiking in Scotland/England during the winter.  They are no grommed tracks and snow quality varies alot.

 

Should I be looking for cross country waxless skis or general skis (if there are such things) or even back country skis and use skins?

I'm 6ft 1" and 15 stone without kit so don't want to sink in the white stuff.

 

Any advice on the above would be welcome.

 

thanks and look forward to your reply.

 

Andy 

post #2 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andyuk View Post

Hi there this seems like a really good forum, good to meet you all.

 

I live in the UK and have snowboarded for the last 9 years but never skied!

 

I'm looking for some skis to use in the UK on the flat and also when out hiking in Scotland/England during the winter.  They are no grommed tracks and snow quality varies alot.

 

Should I be looking for cross country waxless skis or general skis (if there are such things) or even back country skis and use skins?

I'm 6ft 1" and 15 stone without kit so don't want to sink in the white stuff.

 

Any advice on the above would be welcome.

 

thanks and look forward to your reply.

 

Andy 




it sounds like your looking for XCD skis.

 

XCD skis are XC skis with metal edges so that skiing down the hill isnt as scary as normal XC skis.

 

Karhu Guide is more convential choice

 

http://www.offpistemag.com/permalink.asp?id=227

 

If you want something to make the down as fun as possible use these

 

http://www.rei.com/product/805197/rossignol-bc-125-positrack-backcountry-skis

 

they will both accept everything from 3 pin, to cable tele, to dynafit to even naxo/freerides.

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi thanks for the reply... really usefull.

 

The XCD skis look great, I guess they will weigh more than standard XC skis due to the metal edge? 

 

Are standard XC skis OK on unpacked snow or will I sink?

 

What lenght poles are good for touring?

 

thanks in advance...

post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andyuk View Post

Hi thanks for the reply... really usefull.

 

The XCD skis look great, I guess they will weigh more than standard XC skis due to the metal edge? 

 

Are standard XC skis OK on unpacked snow or will I sink?

 

What lenght poles are good for touring?

 

thanks in advance...




depends on the snow really.

post #5 of 12

OTOH, as the OP is a snowboarder, he/she might look at a split baord or some approach skis.  Also, probably better asked in here http://www.epicski.com/forum/list/13/backcountry-and-cross-country

 

Re poles, get adjustables (or if you use a splt board or approach skis, collapsables), you can then have any length you want.

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

thanks for the reply

post #7 of 12

You are likely to break XC skis in ungroomed snow if you de-camber them too much as they aren't very strong or you will work hard at moving forward as you will be sinking as they are too narrow to 'float' a skier on soft snow. The 'split' snowboard is a pretty ideal solution for flat and climbing scenarios where you will want to ride down. On flats you can use 'kicker' wax on any skis instead of climbing skins when only a little traction is needed. Kicker wax will let the skis/split board glide easily yet give you enough grip to move forward. When you don't need the kicker wax, just scrape it off. I use the metal edge of one ski as a scraper on the other ski to remove wax when it is no longer desired such as in the descent or before putting skins on.

post #8 of 12

Andy, almost everything depends on how much and often you think you'll be skiing down.  If you're going to be skiing downhill very much, a cross-country ski will take a lot of getting used to.  THe problem is, that anything you add to provide more control on descents makes the rig much heavier and really detracts from the enjoyment when you're on relative flats.

 

On flats and mild hills, an XCD setup will provide all the support and flotation you need unless the snow is super-deep and super-light.  I'm a longtime alpine and randonnee skier (if that term is foreign to you, it simply means that I do quite a bit of hiking up mountains in order to ski back down them).  In THAT scenario, it's fairly important to have fairly solid boots, bindings, and skis in order to provide the best performance for the downhill portion of the day.  That all adds weight, though.

 

This past winter, I did quite a lot of cross country skiing in the area surrounding my house.  That terrain is mostly flat with mild ups and downs thrown in for variety.  When I started early in the winter, I would plod along in my alpine touring setup with moderately heavy boots, alpine skis, and skins (I didn't own any cross country gear).  My wife joined me on a few outings and she was using her XCD skis.  I was doing about twice the work that she was and I was going slower.  She kept after me until I finally broke down and bought some XCD gear.  The skis I bought are Alpina Woody in the 190cm length.  Here's a website with the specs:

 

http://www.skis.com/cross-country-skis/c132/alpina-woody-cross-country-skis-2011-p204971.html?utm_source=google&utm_medium=googlebase&utm_campaign=googleproductsearch&mr:trackingCode=F5723911-7E3F-E011-8262-001B2163195C&mr:referralID=NA 

 

If that giant URL doesn't open, just Google "Alpina Woody cross country skis" and you'll find them.  

 

I weigh about a stone less than you and I bought the 190cm length.  I actually skied on them a lot once I had them.  We had a LOT of snow here in Jackson Hole this winter, and I never really found myself sinking in all that much.  There are similar skis that have a little more width if that really concerns you, and in an XCD ski a little extra width really doesn't add all that much weight.

 

The bottom line is that I was able to ski much farther and much faster with way more comfort on the XCD skis than when I was trying to "get by" with my randonnee gear.  

 

XCD would be my recommendation.

 

Good luck and have fun!

post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 

Bob thanks for the reply, really useful info. I've looked at a few XCD skis and some XC, those you linked too look good.

 Is a touring ski the same as an XCD ski?

 As the terrain around home is mostly flat I want to remain in the skis on the slight up hills with only having to hike occasionally.  The snow here is very mixed so I've been looking at wax less skis.  What type of binding would you suggest?  

post #10 of 12

If you're going with an XCD ski you should go with a BC-NNN binding.  
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andyuk View Post

Bob thanks for the reply, really useful info. I've looked at a few XCD skis and some XC, those you linked too look good.

 Is a touring ski the same as an XCD ski?

 As the terrain around home is mostly flat I want to remain in the skis on the slight up hills with only having to hike occasionally.  The snow here is very mixed so I've been looking at wax less skis.  What type of binding would you suggest?  



 

post #11 of 12

Here's a video that touches on a lot of things that might be of interest...

 

post #12 of 12


Bob, what bindings and boots did you go with to complete your XCD setup?

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