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Off slope ski lessons instead

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

I am wondering if anyone offers classroom lessons.  I have been skiing for a long time and for someone like me it would make sense to have an alternative method of recieving instruction.  I think that a classroom approach would lend itself toward teaching all aspects of the sport.

 

When skiing the instructor correctly focuses on the ability of the skier based on what the instructor sees as the skier demonstrates a techniqe or exercise first demonstrated by the instuctor.  This is great for all of the right reasons but having a classroom presentation would enable the address of topics usually not covered during a lesson.

 

A classroom format would allow video taped technique with in-depth explanation, repeated viewing of the video and multiple questions from the student.

 

A discussioni of Different kinds of skis and boots for different purposes and conditions would be really helpful and would help the student to focus on new ways to ski.

 

Or just a Q&A about whatever is on the mind of the student which may be difficult on slope.

 

Discussion of physical conditioning for skiing is another topic that could be covered.

 

Of course the classroom lesson would never replace the invaluable on-slope instuction but this would be a great adjunct regular lessons or could be a way to end a lesson.

 

perhaps to intersperse classroom with on-slope would be good.

 

 

post #2 of 25

PSIA-i does some lecture series every year that addresses some of these topics.  I'm sure other divisions do as well.  My SS does "chalk talks" every Thursday night during the season that cover many of those topics.  I attended a great PSIA talk on Bio-mechanics and Movement Analaysis last November.  Some of the better Chalk Talks included WC MA with guest speaker Johnathan Selkowitz (WC photographer), Stance & Alignment, and problem children.  I went to every chalk talk offered this past season.  I think they helped me a lot. I like looking at video, drinking beer, and getting all nerdy.  Joe....  Maybe your local SS does something similar and would be willing to let you attend.  I'd bet that a beer offering would grease the wheels.

post #3 of 25

I don't believe most ski schools have lecture series. There are on line sources of information about skiing including in depth discussions about technique, equipment, etc.

post #4 of 25
Thread Starter 

Yeah I think these talks are usually just for Instructors so its hard to even find out about when they are scheduled.  my home ski area is 2 1/2 hrs away so I like to set this up for my next trip outwest. 

 

Most of us dont take lessons at small local Wisconsin ski areas as it is hard to find instructors who ski like we do. TPJ, you would crack up at the robotics taught around here.

 

I think that a classroom session would be a great adjunct to regular on slope sessions. 

 

I thin part of it is that I dont like bumps or steeps but love powder so at my level my goals are supposed to be to improve at bumps...so its like I want a chance to just drill a good instructor and let them expound on whatever geeked questions I can come up with.....because somewhere between the strong carved turn and bumps, there is alot happening.

 

Also if I were to take a level 8 lesson, I prob would slow down the group too much cuz I only ski like 200 yds at a time and require considerable reovery time if I do that....But technique wise that is the level lesson I should have....so to have a session where I could ski and then go to a format where talk is the priority....I would learn something...alot....especially if I could get sort of customised infor as to what is on my mind and not what is on the mind of someone else.

 

This is probably true for alot of older skiers who may be skilled but who for whatever reason are not in the physical condition needed to really tap a good level lesson.

 

I live flat, have had surgeries...and there alot of us out here.  This concept prob good for Intermediates too who want to discover more suspecting there is alot they may be missingyet who are technically good skiers.

post #5 of 25

>>Some of the better Chalk Talks included WC MA with guest speaker Johnathan Selkowitz (WC photographer), Stance & Alignment, and problem children.<<

 

Emphasis mine.

 

That is the best unintentionally hilarious sentence I've seen in weeks.

 

I hate problem children. They ruin everything.

 

I bet some of my urban-ed Problem Students could set some of those Problem Children straight, real quick.

 

Sorry. I have a mental picture of 6'3" 250 lbs Tashaun towering over some bratty tween-ager...

 

"Parallel? You call that parallel?"

 

A clash of cultures, indeed.

 

Cheers,

 

@

post #6 of 25

Before I moved to J-Hole, I worked with Youth at risk doing team building in a "hoods in the woods" type program.  I really liked the job.  It was interesting how some of the tough inner city kids changed their tune once they were dropped off in the "wilderness" and the new reality set in.  I really enjoyed watching some of the status within the group shift away from those who it started with and gravitate towards the ones who could help the group the best in the new environment.  I was the type of Wilderness Challenge leader who would explain things once, help a little the second time, and let them fail after that.  As long as safety wasn't an issue, I was happy to let a group go hungry or get wet in the rain.  My poop was always in a group and they could copy me, or pull together as a group and get things done.  Usually a bit of discomfort caused a new leader to step up from within the group.

 

 I really don't have too many problems with dealing with problem children in ski lessons.  For one thing I teach mostly adults and for another I just won't buy into the drama.  BTW I have found that the kids training is really valuable for teaching adults.  Many adults are the same basic people that they were as children.  IMO you can teach adults the same way you teach children, but you can't teach children the same way you teach adults.  I treat all my students with respect and don't talk down to any of them adults or children.  I am a firm believer in setting boundaries and sticking to them.  Actions = Consequences. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Allison Matura View Post

>>Some of the better Chalk Talks included WC MA with guest speaker Johnathan Selkowitz (WC photographer), Stance & Alignment, and problem children.<<

 

Emphasis mine.

 

That is the best unintentionally hilarious sentence I've seen in weeks.

 

I hate problem children. They ruin everything.

 

I bet some of my urban-ed Problem Students could set some of those Problem Children straight, real quick.

 

Sorry. I have a mental picture of 6'3" 250 lbs Tashaun towering over some bratty tween-ager...

 

"Parallel? You call that parallel?"

 

A clash of cultures, indeed.

 

Cheers,

 

@



 

post #7 of 25

I think that would be a good idea.  An alternative that might also work is to have some kind of "online" place where people could ask questions or post videos, and get answers or analysis from experienced pros.  Actually on second thought, that would likley never work. snowfalling.gif

post #8 of 25

I think a great venue for classroom instruction would be the local ski shop.

 

Everyone would benefit: attendees would learn, ski shops will develop relationships with potential customers, bring them into their store on a regular basis, and solidify their credentials as knowledgeable advisors that can not only sell them new gear, but help their customers become better skiers.

 

A few years ago, one of the local ski shops in my area gave a free, hands-on ski waxing and tuning class. Not only did I learn proper waxing / tuning, I ended up purchasing some supplies from them - and it was a ski shop that I never visited before.

post #9 of 25

You should check out Weem's and Rick's stuff.  There are plenty of materials out there that can be consumed on dry land and provide food for thought over the off season then practiced on the snow when the time comes.

 

 

post #10 of 25
Thread Starter 

Yeah all good and I think that working in demo skis of different types presented in a longer format, not just brands and models as usual, but about styles of skis, different uses and then demo the ones you like for what you want to do.  Try a ski that fits the techniques you learned about.

 

And that is one topic.   How to , where to, when to, helmets, physical conditioning....wax n tune, Boots, tuning boots (fit), foot bed options, all kind of gear questions.

 

yeah like a live ski forum with vids and survival talk, beers.

 

I think it would be seriously good and a decent revenue stream for motivation.

 

Somewhere along the way here someone said that his local area ran video, I guess continuously on slope and people would gather at end of day and talk technique.  A more professional line of that would be cool, expensive but useful.

post #11 of 25


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ILOJ View Post

I think a great venue for classroom instruction would be the local ski shop.

 


 

How about inviting some preferred customers to those little seminars that industry reps put together to equip the ski shop employees with the knowledge required to better sell their new product lines?  Or, making videos of them and re-using them showing them to groups of customers?  I'm not sure that getting adult education instructional design experts to develop a curriculum of adult ski gear and skiing education programs is viable, but re purposing some of the existing assets seems pretty doable to me.

post #12 of 25

I'm not sure I'd invite the public to the rep's seminar, but having a shop seminar for the customers would be really cool, tuning, wax, and ski technique on a slow evening (a keg and donations?). Missing Link in Berkeley used to have (may still) bike maintenance classes and public access to some tools for their customers. great idea. Too much detailed technique instruction off the slope could just make a skier too mental, however.

post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post

I think that would be a good idea.  An alternative that might also work is to have some kind of "online" place where people could ask questions or post videos, and get answers or analysis from experienced pros.  Actually on second thought, that would likley never work. snowfalling.gif


hey, when things are light, you're pretty funny.

 

note that Joe's a pretty cerebral guy, so wants to analyze objectively, so could use information to advantage.

 

post #14 of 25

I think the inter net would work if Al Gore ever get around tuit.

post #15 of 25

Cookies. Take all that knowledge and bake it into cookies, brownies, fudge. No need to read or search or for that matter ski, just eat it up. Share it off slope or in the chair. What do you think about that?

post #16 of 25
Thread Starter 

Brownies and tea for all.

post #17 of 25

Ya tea, brownies and tea how'd i forget teh tea? I think dryland indoor meeting or seminar might not be the most effective or fun way to learn to ski bumps. Learning to tune skis, talking about new equipment, boot fitting would be interesting. I might be in for a movement analysis class.

post #18 of 25

Maybe they can have dry land courses at Xanaduduck.gif

 

roflmao.gif

post #19 of 25

I think that classroom-based instruction would be good for some skiers of all skill levels, b/c some people may have a learning style that would be better suited to classroom instruction as a supplement to, or substitute for, on-snow instruction.  I know the best golf lessons involve video analysis "off-course."

 

I personally would like to take "classroom" classes on avalanche safety, ski tech/maintenance (i.e. mounting bindings), racing technique/tactics, and the like.  It would be nice if such classes were available at reasonable prices on iTunesU, or something.  I'm aware there are instructional DVDs out there (which will remain un-named), but the price is outrageous and probably on principle alone I will never pay those prices.

 

 

Oh, I forgot to add... there have been suggestions that EpicSki is a substitution for ski instruction... alot of instructors here offer fantastic advice to users posting questions, however there are alot of comments that are purely critical/belittling in nature (even if disguised as genuine advice) and are completely not helpful to people who want to learn.  Also, on an internet forum like this, people are going to misrepresent their skill level (in BOTH directions).  Some people describe themselves as "aggressive level 9" who are probably actually level 7, some people say they "can't ski" certain terrain and are mistook for a beginner, some people might be perfectionists and--as such--not think too highly of their own skiing when it is in fact pretty good, some people say they live somewhere or skied some line and are taken for a ripper, etc.  This can all be gross interference to the exchange of proper advice.  WAY too much assuming going on here, again, in both directions.... and that makes some advice here utterly useless and possible counterproductive to the goal.


Edited by Vitamin Ski - 5/11/11 at 9:44am
post #20 of 25

Really, we need a contest for the best answer.

 

Let me start:

 

In 50 words of less, I think that dry land is ...

 

The winner will get an all expense paid for lift line experience at Xanaxdu.  smile.gif

 

This smile.gif ,,, (Jeff Foxworthy voice) .... or  drool.gif

post #21 of 25

If you want one-stop shopping, why not go to one of the ski camps that does video-taped on-snow training in the morning, and then video review & analysis, boot setup, etc in the afternoon?

 

It doesn't sound like it would include the workout routines or ski demos to the degree you want, but those are pretty easy to do separately..

post #22 of 25
Thread Starter 

I think that dry land is....or could be......neato if you could hear about skis and then demo without a tie to the brand being sold per se.  Demo some powder skis....with offf set bindings for this type of skiing and here is what they are like with binders mounted tradiitional. 

 

Often if you go in a shop and say that you like to "really ski blues run hard cuz I dont like to show up on a black run thinking I am going to ski steeps only find bumps up to my ass for two miles"  They had you a pair of limp noodle super shaped skis saying "these are great intermediate to advanced skis and will reallly help the intermediate to improve."

 

Then I go out and hook a few turns, bring em back in and say, too sort of hooky, they hand me something they think I would like by what they think I said about my skiing in which I said the word blue and they think I said pooh.  I ask oh well how about something with more balanced flex and then I get em on, walk out of the shop, back to the lift line....oh balanced, still too stiff how about the same thing wider under foot....Oh Ok what kind of runs do you ski....And I start over and explain myself like on a thread about collisions and the uphill skier.....repeating bobbing, weaving,,,,praying for patience, right left,,,to the mat alls to the wall.

 

Once on the third set o skis, I left my helmet in the shop and had to go all the way back to get it....now theyre handing me gaper skis and I hate them...so I go to another shop where I say.....oh how about some really wide skis cux I only rip pow and big lines....and

 

At a truly instuctional talk about ski types, the instuctor talks about all kinds of skis and I ask questions honed to choose for myself without wasting time, then I go out and try different skis that I pick specific to shape, stiffness, purpose, and eventually brand and model....

 

Suppose I could read about em in the ski Mag buyers guide who is proud to rate 69,000 skis to help decide or I couls ask my cus who lives Vail and has a quiver of rippers who love her long time... and asks why do you ski that short shit? as advice.

 

So the seminar sort of method allows me two things, first I can pick from various brands and not just the brands the ski shop carries.  Second I can yhink iot through without trying to explain hwo I ski or saying where I ski and waiting for the considered expression yet generic answer tool from the ski shop guy who really thinks these K2s r whatever are perfect for the kind of skier Iam...

 

The next sentence starts with....look, kid....and in the mean time, the tick toc happens to my perfect day of 4" of pow.

 

 

 

post #23 of 25

Joe, your opening post sounds like a racing based program.

post #24 of 25

Well, I don't ski very often in a year, because I have other things I have to do. But, since the spring, summer, and fall seasons have no snow, I cannot ski on it for several months at a time, which deteriorates my skill significantly. When I return onto the slopes the next season, I tend to forget many of the skills I learned. I'm questioning if there are off-slope training or lessons, or even skiing simulators. Because skiing is a hobby of my own, I don't want it to be wasted just because of the months-long off-season.

 

korolevspace

post #25 of 25
Thread Starter 

yeah more good reason for off slope lessons.  Training, technique reminders, how to get back into skiing,

 

great ideas

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