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Active Release Technique? anyone try it?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

I did a search but nothing showed up.

post #2 of 17
Google - physical therapy active release. Lots there
post #3 of 17

I've had just about every variety of manual therapy done, including active release. The first practitioner I went to who did this was useless, and it did nothing for me except deplete my bank account. But I have since been to a few another practitioners who use it in addition to other tools and it has been very helpful.  Bottom line: it's about the person, not the technique. Forget about specific approaches like ART and find a great massage/athletic/physical therapist or chirpractor or osteopath, and they'll make you right again.  

 

Good luck.

 

Elsbeth

post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 


Thanks, I have a great massage person who worked on some Olympians and other sports programs, I am thinking to just stick with her. I aways like to get opinions of other folks around here. Of course I had already googled it and there's mixed info and opinions. Like to hear first hand.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by evaino View Post

I've had just about every variety of manual therapy done, including active release. The first practitioner I went to who did this was useless, and it did nothing for me except deplete my bank account. But I have since been to a few another practitioners who use it in addition to other tools and it has been very helpful.  Bottom line: it's about the person, not the technique. Forget about specific approaches like ART and find a great massage/athletic/physical therapist or chirpractor or osteopath, and they'll make you right again.  

 

Good luck.

 

Elsbeth



 

post #5 of 17

Trigger Point Therapy?

 

http://www.bonnieprudden.com/about.html 

 

I've done this with/to my wife; if you can find the point, apply the right pressure and feel the release it works.

post #6 of 17

ART is the real deal but as was mentioned results vary depending on the skill of the practitioner. I've been to two. I was fortunate to see an ART guy who works on pro athletes and has the highest level of ART certification. He can be a magician and athletes I've referred to him have had great results too. I also have seen a chiro who had minimal experience with ART. She was ok but truthfully I could have done most of the release work she performed at home with a foam roller or lacrosse ball, her value was having more tools in her bag i.e. chiro adjustments.

 

Also, one thing to note is the higher your pain tolerance the more work the practitioner can perform each session, so you'll get faster results. If you have a great massage practitioner who understands biomechanics, muscle tonus, etc. and has experience with high level athletes I would hold off on ART until you reach a problem they can't solve.

post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post


Thanks, I have a great massage person who worked on some Olympians and other sports programs, I am thinking to just stick with her. I aways like to get opinions of other folks around here. Of course I had already googled it and there's mixed info and opinions. Like to hear first hand.
 



 



If you've got a good one, then stick with her. But that said - it is not a bad idea to try out someone else to add to your resources. Sometimes even the great ones will work on you for one thing and for whatever reason, are not really able to get results, even though they've done well by you in the past. So for those situations, it's nice to have a second "go to" person. Remember that even the great professionals have their strong and weak points. One may have great hands but not be as good at assessment (or vice versa); or be great with hips/backs but less so with necks/shoulders. 

 

Since you've got a great massage therapist, I'd suggest trying to find a great athletic/phsyical therapist or chiro. In my personal experience, I find athletic therapists tend to be better than physical therapists or chiros, but there are excellent therapists among all 3 professions; and on the flip side there are terrible ones in all 3.

 

Personally I have 2 massage therapists, a physio, 2 athletic therapists and an osteopath on my call list. Obviously that's excessive, but keep in mind that I work in a sports therapy clinic, so I have more access to these pros than most. 

 

Elsbeth

post #8 of 17

I think this is some great dialog here !!  I think the fundamentals of ART are really great & are forcing folks to re-examine how we treat pts.  The bottom line is that a good clinician can make all the difference.  I have my own spin on some of the selective soft tissue techniques, yet look at them as a tool in the box.  Not every tool is right for every person / scenerio. 

 

For those who are looking for different approaches, google NOI & neurodynamics!!

post #9 of 17
I have used active release (ART) extensively. Here in Canada it is a branch of the chiropractic medical practice. As others have stated, the quality of the practitioner is key, and knowing what their experience is remains key. The person I use here in Vancouver has worked with NFL football teams and other professional athletes, and as a result, the quality of her experience and knowledge is evident.

As a result of a long term back issue, I have experimented with a variety of treatment and trAining options. Physio was the least useful, massage, if properly administered in a deep tissue manner has been very effective. Acupuncture in some instances for various muscle tension issues has been useful; but ART has been the most useful with the best outcome of all methods, especially when used in conjunction with deep tissue massage.

This treatment has been instrumental in keeping my 42 year old body training and skiing aggressively, and strong for the free ride mountain bike season. Treatment is rare and delivered around the idea of getting you back in the game and active ASAP, rather than creating a dependancy that requires endless treatment and resources.
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 

Good stuff, I will check it out then.

post #11 of 17

Just had my first ART session today; practitioner came highly recommended from some high-level athlete friends around here (he is a PGA chiro, apparently). I can tell a difference already, crossing my fingers ...

post #12 of 17

So, I've had four treatments, and each time my pain has let up considerably. I'm not totally pain-free, but I'm close, and I played tennis Sat and Sun with no worsening of symptoms. 

 

However, after treatment this past Monday, I let the chiro adjust my spine -- within a couple of hours, I was feeling some stiffness and soreness, which I didn't think was necessarily that unusual. It progressed to pain that night and yesterday morning, but was much better last night and this morning ... and then today  I reached forward to get something and went into extremely painful mid-back spasms. Now I'm laid out on my bed practically in tears, with hydrocodone bottles scattered around me ... Perhaps it's just a coincidence, but ... now I'm scared to go back there. He did the same thing on Thursday last week, and I was fine afterward.

 

My arm feels great, though.

post #13 of 17

All done, pain is about 95% gone. (Back got fixed, too, hips had gone about 2 inches cockeyed.) I'm definitely a believer ... he taught me how do some of the manipulations myself, and I have a few stretches, etc. but I'm pretty much back to normal.

 

post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 

I have EMG's scheduled for tomorrow, lots of fun I hear.  After that we can tell a little better about what and where the nerve impingement is originating from.  All bets are on Pronator Teres syndrome and some kind of brachial issue in the upper chest area but there's an outside bet it could be from my degenerated disks...  Standby.... 

post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 

FWIW- EMG showed Pronator Teres. 

 

I had my 1st treatment with ART today and was very impressed. I had some real relief in tightness in forearm and hand.  Also I much better feeling in hand, better circulation  skin color difference between both hands is improved. Doctor located nerves in neck that are also involved. By pressing on a spot on my neck, he triggered my thumb and two fingers and forearm to experience strong needles and pins sensation. EMG showed no blockage at the vertebrae but they didn't test anything else in the neck or chest.  Next treatment is Friday

post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 

a quick follow-up.

 

ART is pretty awesome stuff. to much of the suprise of my Ortho, ART treatment has been extremely effective. the therapist (also a chiro) can't be sure that it will hold up to the forces when skiing but it is coming along well and I have substantially less pain. We are also treating my neck and working on re-learning the way I hold my head and keeping my shoulders back. 

post #17 of 17

I had three sessions with the active release technique. I am sure yet, they say about 6 visits. There should be a change for the better.

 

 

Beth S.

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