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How do you adjust the Atomic Power Control?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

What is the purpose of the Atomic Power Control feature, and what’s the proper way to adjust it? Also, I keep seeing references to boot stiffness, but can’t find any explanation of the physical significance of the numbers or how stiff mine are (Atomic M9’s, about 5 years old).

I had been struggling to get out of the back seat and thought it might help to kick the cuff angle forward, and as far as I could tell that’s what the Power Control was intended to do. So I loosened the screws, put the boots on, put my toes against a wall and flexed my ankles so that my kneecaps also touched the wall. Then I had someone tighten the screws back down, the result being that the scale on the Power Control indicated its most forward position.

That seemed to help my posture a lot. I’m on Head Worldcup ISL’s with Tyrolia demo bindings, and I eventually discovered that moving the bindings two settings forward quickened up my turns and reduced my tendency to wash out in the back.

That was a couple of years ago, with lots of training I’ve gotten a lot better about staying forward and I now consider myself a PSIA 8 (provided I’m on groomers). My ankles have a lot more range of motion left, and as far as I can tell I’m not having any problems pressuring the front of the boots. Only thing is that when I went out west for the first time ever (Alta was great), I was having a lot of quad burn. I suspect that it was mostly due to the altitude, the vastly greater length of the runs and the fact that I've let my core go soft. But might the forward lean of the cuff have contributed? In general I’m trying to understand what happens when you vary forward lean.

Thanks.

post #2 of 5

The M9 is a 90 flex boot. The power control drives the cuff foward 2 degrees. If you really want to gain advantage of this feature, increase the ramp angle under you heel to match the lean you created in the cuff. Add a heel lift and see the results...That model has the removeable toe and heel lugs. There are some heel lugs out there that increase the height of the heel by 8mm. Talk about foward lean!! Do it and you will feel like Eddy the Eagle! Ha!biggrin.gif

post #3 of 5

 

"Only thing is that when I went out west for the first time ever (Alta was great), I was having a lot of quad burn. I suspect that it was mostly due to the altitude, the vastly greater length of the runs and the fact that I've let my core go soft. But might the forward lean of the cuff have contributed? In general I’m trying to understand what happens when you vary forward lean."

 

you already understand what happens when you have too much forward lean. your quads burn because you cannot straighten your legs enough to relax the muscles. just to be clear, it is not the altitude or your core strength that was making your quads burn. there is a one to one ratio of too much forward lean and over worked quads.

 

there is no advantage to gain from a feature that does not work for your physiology. you need to straighten up your stance, not increase your forward lean. so my advice is no forcing the cuff forward, no forward lean shim, no heel lift under the liner, no heel lugs with increased height.

 

one other possibility from your description of quad burn is that the boot is way too big on your foot, and you are throwing muscle tension at your feet to gain control over your skis.

 

go see a competent boot fitter.

 

jim

 

 

post #4 of 5
Thread Starter 

Thanks, starthaus, I'm sure you're right. The foot is snug. When I'm thinking about straightening up my weight seems centered on my arch, but when I relax into the tongues my knees kick at least 2 inches forward and my weight shifts onto the ball of my foot. Maybe I need a stiffer boot (5'11", 160 lbs), but in the meantime I'll dink around with the lean and talk to my bootfitter about it before next season. In all fairness, when I saw him before I was talking about the hot spots on my shin and foot and didn't know enough to ask him about the lean.

post #5 of 5

I'll second Jim.  Increasing ramp angle and/or forward lean is NO guarantee that  any assistance in staying forward will be forthcoming.  Often skiers compensate by staying back even further.  In addition the excessive angles are exhausting.

 

I'd go with Jim's idea and encourage at least an experiment with less forward lean and less ramp.  Do one at a time to learn the effects of each.

 

Lou

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ask the Boot Guys › How do you adjust the Atomic Power Control?