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The three most common skier mistakes seen this year!

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Amazing how persons will spend well over $1,000 on ski equipment,,,yet never consider paying just $50 for ski instructions! This is not a marketing message for ski instructors but rather "recommendation" for skiers to learn for a qualified teacher!

Most skiers have no idea how easy it is to ski once you have mastered some basic skills! 3 errors I constantly see ! 3 errors I see others "teach" to their wives, friends and guests!

If only a skier would eliminate these 3 basic errors,,then progress would be better for 90% of the skiers!

Most of the readers of this post know these 3 errors ( in various terms) since they are "keen" skiers,,,,,,yet looking at some of the pictures posted it is clear that some do need "remediation" !

Have fun. Post your suggested three common basic errors. Remember these are not subtle technical errors such as, "left inner toe is not pressured downhill" ! Rather these are gross, key skiing errors that act as "barriers" to effective skiing!

In three days,,,we will have that discussion!
post #2 of 22

i agree on the lessons big time.

 

just this wkend at my local mtn cypress, there was this dude (a late 20s or early 30s persian dude with an outdated, traditional macho controlling attitude) impatiently waiting for his persian girlfriend to try to come down a blue/black run...he even yelled at her 'C'mon!' , and yet you could see she was scared and yelling back....he skied down...

 

going up the same lift  over a hlf hr or so I saw they'd made little progression down the hill, so I skied over to her and asked if she was alright ...told me she'd only been up skiing TWICE before (with 1 or 2 lessons)...she couldn't even do a wedge...or if she could her confidence was now lost due to macho boyfriend: "my legs feel frozen and I've lost my confidence" ....she said with admiration--get this--that her boyfriend was ''a good skier'' and self taught...''he has never had taken a lesson in his life'', she gushingly noted.nonono2.gif....I then grew as equally choked at her own stupidity (and naivete) as at his: I advised her to get a new boyfriend and go to the green/bunny hill where she could relax, have FUN, take her time and also some lessons.

 

What dufus boyfriend had done instead was to have her freeze up and discourage her from going skiing again...all the while he would sulk below (when she did come down to the base) that his gal wasn't as atheletic or as ''competently self taught'' as he was.... LOSER.icon13.gif


While having a burger on the patio down below, I looked up and contined to see him (and now another skiier) try to help her down, showing her a wedge....I think she eventually walked down.

So much for being protective of his gal and truly looking out for her.icon13.gif

 

lastly, dufus macho boy wasn't even wearing a helmet, esp given his lacking skill level, which, when coupled on the runs he was on, heightens the probability of injury (but I guess just as he felt he was ''above'' the need for spending $ on  lessons, so too was his superior ability not to need any safety equipment and  thus save the  ''costs'').icon13.gif

 

PS I am a BIG believer in taking ongoing lessons in skiing.....there are always things to improve upon. I find I don't make as much progression in my skiing if I go for a long time without some feedback to help me break out of a plateau, or to shake things up...or make me approach things in a different manner.


Edited by canali - 4/24/11 at 2:19pm
post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 
You have raised another ski learning issue ( that I am sure will generate great debate)!

That is the boyfriend or husband teaching the "other" how to ski! A great short cut to conflict!

Why?

Teaching anything is a mixture of science and art! Yes learning the theory of socio-constructivist learning is a university course,,but then applying it to a specific context and person is an art! Seems easy when done by a "good teacher",,,,but so dangerous when tried by an amateur!

Saw last week a nice,,,,, nice young man trying to teach his girlfriend on an intermediate slope! The fear was projecting from her eyes! His assurance was surpassed only by his ignorance in not even knowing the life long harm he was doing to this girl and to their relationship!

If you really love the other,,,,get an instructor you will have peace of mind,,a wonderful supper at the end of the day and even more,,,,,,,, a life long skiing partner!

Now back to those three basic errors,,,,90% of skiers demonstrate!
post #4 of 22

we call it the boyfriend syndrome on ski patrol, the leading causes of 10-46s (free ride down).

post #5 of 22

I'd say the worst mistakes  skiers and "potential skiers" make are..

 

Never evers not taking some kind of real lesson before getting on a chairlift.

 

Trying to ski on inappropriate gear for conditions , or abiliity level, or decade.

 

Continuing to ski hard when you're too tired and should take a break or call it a day.

 

 

Anybody can get bitten by the last one..

 

post #6 of 22

Drinking the Devils Tea. beercheer.gif

 

Smoking the Devils weed.  devil.gif

 

Two feet on one wide funky adzzed ski.  I guess they lost one?  tongue.gif

post #7 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post

Drinking the Devils Tea. beercheer.gif

 

Smoking the Devils weed.  devil.gif

 

Skiing the Devil's Crotch. tongue.gif


Fixed it for ya.

 

post #8 of 22

1.  rotating the whole body around to help generate the turn ............. (and not realizing there is a better option)

2.  sitting back on the tails of the skis ............ (and not being able to feel that the weight is back)

3.  leaning over at the waist to maintain balance ............ (and not knowing how to replace this stressful stance)

4.  wearing boots that are too big ............ (and thinking they fit just fine)

 

post #9 of 22

1.  +1 on wearing boots too big

2. wearing no shirt on a 5 degree and windy night

3. wearing no helmet or hat on that same night just so people can see your flowing blonde hair.

post #10 of 22

Learn to read the signs

 

read the signs

 

 

It might be important

post #11 of 22

1) Somebody on this forum posted that the problem that most skiers have is that "they speed up when they should be slowing down, and they slow down when they should be speeding up".  That is, they rush through the turn initiation so that they don't speed up, and they cut off the turn finish so that they can speed up.

 

2) They lean into the hill

 

3) They complain that there hasn't been enough grooming done.

 

post #12 of 22
Thread Starter 
liquidfeet knows his/her stuff!

Great answers and 80% correct!

Smart skier!

Your site Epic identity gives you a "hint" on the one that you did not get right! Yes it has something to do with the feet ( or that region) !!!!

As far as the "original',,,, off the wall answers,,,,,,,,great humor!
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post

Learn to read the signs

 

 

Rules.gif
 

Are you saying that we shouldn't duck the ropes Mr Patrol?

biggrin.gif

 

#4) Getting your ticket/pass taken away for not following patrolman's instructions!


Edited by crgildart - 4/25/11 at 6:06am
post #14 of 22


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post



Rules.gif
 

Are you saying that we shouldn't duck the ropes Mr Patrol?

biggrin.gif

 

#4) Getting your ticket/pass taken away for not following patrolman's instructions!


 


you should duck every rope at snowbird that says "warning Cliffs"on it because that where the fun stuff is.

post #15 of 22

Most common fault I see:  rigidly skiing with hands at their side thus ensuring they are in the backseat.

post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

Most common fault I see:  rigidly skiing with hands at their side thus ensuring they are in the backseat.


Chicken wings => elbows up, hands wide and back out of sight => backseat blues

 

If you can't see the beers balanced on the top of your poles you will never be able to enjoy then at the end of the run !!!!!
 

 

post #17 of 22
  1. Making ski plans with friends who are not really into skiing
  2. Basing your ski trip on whether others are going
  3. Making ski plans with friends who have very small children 
post #18 of 22

I agree with #2 and #3 in particular.  Now that most of my friends have kids (myself included) and all of our jobs have crazy schedules that make it tough to line up, when I can get away I basically send out an email blast that says, "I'm going up to Tahoe this weekend - if you can make it, great, if not, maybe next time."  If I only skied when my friends could, I'd hardly ever go.  Taking the I'm-going-either-way approach has been very liberating.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post

  1. Making ski plans with friends who are not really into skiing
  2. Basing your ski trip on whether others are going
  3. Making ski plans with friends who have very small children 


 

post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by falcon_o View Post

Chicken wings => elbows up, hands wide and back out of sight => backseat blues

 

If you can't see the beers balanced on the top of your poles you will never be able to enjoy then at the end of the run !!!!!
 

 

Not chicken wings, this is arms hanging straight down, pole baskets bouncing on the snow.
 

 

post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

1.  rotating the whole body around to help generate the turn ............. (and not realizing there is a better option)

2.  sitting back on the tails of the skis ............ (and not being able to feel that the weight is back)

3.  leaning over at the waist to maintain balance ............ (and not knowing how to replace this stressful stance)

4.  wearing boots that are too big ............ (and thinking they fit just fine)

 


I would add leaning into the mountain on this, which insufficently weights the downhill ski and (together with not shifting weight early enough in the turn) leaves the skier vulnerable to more variable conditions.... but this about sums it up for the most common ones I see.
 

 

post #21 of 22

You mean broken chicken wings !!!!! I see many flappers on the slopes as described - elbows up, arms wide, hands back & as a result riding their tails 



Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

Not chicken wings, this is arms hanging straight down, pole baskets bouncing on the snow.
 

 



 

post #22 of 22
  1. Balanced too far aft and/or not moving COM directionally into turn.
  2. Beginning turn with upper body instead of feet.
  3. Not using a ski as it was designed to be a tool in the snow, put it on edge and bend it to turn.

 

1 and 2 you see from level 1 up to about level 5 or 6 and causes the low-intermediate rut.

 

3 is they high-intermediate rut and prevents getting to level 7/8.

 

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