or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bindings - Page 2

post #31 of 40

Overall good advice CR, but I have to comment on a few things:
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

 

If these are your first brand new pair of skis I STRONGLY recommend paying someone else to mount them.   Once you have have seen how they are supposed to look and have an example handy to reference pick up a pair of rock skis (used skis that have some wear) and try mounting them yourself.

 

I agree with this suggestion 100%.  At the very least, buy a pair of cheap used skis to practice on before you mount up a brand new pair. 

 

 

I did most of mine myself with no jig and no template.   I haven't done any adjustable ones with a demo track yet though.  A drill with a torque settings might help keep you from stripping the holes and creating "spinners".. that is what you can fix with the heli coils if need be.

 

Don't ever screw bindings down using a drill.  Screw them down by hand and you won't strip any of the holes.

 

 

I CAREFULLY drill the holes and mount the toe pieces.  Use some epoxy in the holes before sinking the screws.   If you're a carpenter you know how to tape a drill bit or make a block to keep it from going too deep.

 

Don't use epoxy in binding holes unless it's a very slow curing epoxy.  Epoxy generates heat as it cures and can damage some ski cores.  I prefer to use standard wood glue.  Another negative of epoxy is that it's very strong and will make un-mounting the binding a pain in the future.

 

 



 

post #32 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeC View Post

Overall good advice CR, but I have to comment on a few things:
 

Don't ever screw bindings down using a drill.  Screw them down by hand and you won't strip any of the holes.
 

I do it by hand whenever I don't have a drill with a low torque setting handy.  And, I use 2 part epoxy.  If you use a drill to remove them they pop out pretty easily.  Wood glue is best with wood cores, but worthless with a foam core.  Epoxy works with both.
 

 

post #33 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

This is all well and good. Now what about setting the DIN? It is not just looking at the chart and tightening to a certain number. How do you know the binding is actually releasing at the right Nm of torque? Even newer bindings there are discrepancies in what the initial setting is an when the binding is torqued correctly. 


But no one outside the US of A (and maybe Canada) cares. The shops don't torque test, just ask you what you weigh and set them roughly according to the chart (or more likely 80kg = 8, 90kg = 9). Are accident statistics better in North America? I don't know, but I'll hazard a guess they're not particularly. Indemnified lists don't count for anything here either ;)

 

post #34 of 40

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

This is all well and good. Now what about setting the DIN? It is not just looking at the chart and tightening to a certain number. How do you know the binding is actually releasing at the right Nm of torque? Even newer bindings there are discrepancies in what the initial setting is an when the binding is torqued correctly.

Umm start with the din calculator setting then stand in the skis with your boots on and see how easy it is to twist out left and right.  See how easy it is to pop the heel up?  Leave them or fine tune them a bit more?  However, if you're not a pretty experienced skier you're not likely to know the difference between tight enough to hold through ruts and chatter and nonono2.giftoo tightfrown.gif (need busted leg emoticon).

post #35 of 40

I thought epoxy and foam cores was a no no?  Can't remember where I read it, but I thought epoxy could dissolve the foam.  

 

The glue isn't really holding the screw in anyway, just forming a barrier to moisture.

 

I guess a drill on very low torque would work ok, but I wouldn't be able to tell when they were tight enough.  Doing it by hand lets me know when they are tight, but not too tight!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post



I do it by hand whenever I don't have a drill with a low torque setting handy.  And, I use 2 part epoxy.  If you use a drill to remove them they pop out pretty easily.  Wood glue is best with wood cores, but worthless with a foam core.  Epoxy works with both.
 

 



 

post #36 of 40

Epoxy will not dissolve foam core.  That is an urban myth! 

 

But as mentioned, epoxy cure is exothermic.  Keep the area from heating above about 100 c  (boiling water)

 

Polyester resin on the other hand....can do a number on many foams,and can generate lots of heat during the cure process.

 

I'm all excited about the readily available polyurethanes sold as "construction adhesives" at the building supply.

 

Tuff stuff, inexpensive, and sticky.  but it takes a while to cure if sealed up (moisture required)

post #37 of 40

Except for really really pissing off the weekend warriors who buy "like new" bindings off craigslist roflmao.gif
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Squawker View Post
 

Indemnified lists don't count for anything here either ;)

 



 

post #38 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaceDude View Post

Except for really really pissing off the weekend warriors who buy "like new" bindings off craigslist roflmao.gif
 



 


 

post #39 of 40

Actually, I did go ahead and redo all the holes with Helicoils...

 

 

post #40 of 40

Roo glue is a rubbery white glue used for melamine applications. I hear it's a good moisture seal glue for binding screws, as it adheres to wood, plastic, and metal.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion