or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Lightweight equipment and knee pain
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Lightweight equipment and knee pain

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

If one has knee pain, say from cartilage loss arthritis etc., would investing in ultralight equipment like Dodge boots

and whatever light skis be much easier on the knees? Wouldn't be surprised if someone suggests it could be worse

since I could see the extra weight down there damping shock loads to the knee. I know this is one of those questions

answered only by trying it, but if there's some rationale, it might be worth trying. Hmm, expensive medical procedure

or expensive juicy new equipment?

post #2 of 7

I think it might help.  I also suffer from OA.  I've been skiing big boards for a long, long time.  I picked up some Bent Chetlers, lighter and shorter and in some conditions, I think they helped?

post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by sCrewz View Post

If one has knee pain, say from cartilage loss arthritis etc., would investing in ultralight equipment like Dodge boots

and whatever light skis be much easier on the knees? Wouldn't be surprised if someone suggests it could be worse

since I could see the extra weight down there damping shock loads to the knee. I know this is one of those questions

answered only by trying it, but if there's some rationale, it might be worth trying. Hmm, expensive medical procedure

or expensive juicy new equipment?

I have advancing OA from removal of meniscus years ago. So you won't be surprised, I guess, to hear from me that you're going the wrong way. Sorta. On groomed, or in variable snow, heavier and damper is the way to go. Stocklis and Heads and Kastles and oil pistons are your friends. Let the ski spank the crud, absorb the shocks, not your knee. And make sure your technique is OK. I've discovered all sorts of ways that I menace my knees just by the bad habits I have. For instance, drop/drive from the hip, not from the knee joint.

 

In real pow, lighter is probably better because less pull on the already stretched and frayed ligaments as you move vertically. Avoid super fat skis, or if you don't, ski with a wide stance so no knock knees and put plates on 'em for better leverage, less shear on knees when turning. Shredhead speaks the truth about shorter being better; less distance from tip to boot = lower angular torque, so less rotary movement of tibia against femur.

 

In bumps, well, only do bumps when you have to, and do them by rolling around shoulders, drifting, not charging zipperlines. And think about a brace if you haven't already. A real brace, not a CVS brace. Outcome: relatively pain-free skiing except for the occasional twinge. And that's what god made ibu for. smile.gif
 

 

post #4 of 7

My knees hurt more after a day on the hard snow with my heavy Race Tigers than after a day of soft bumps on my ultralight Goodes. It might be riding the chairlift though, as I really feel my knees on the way up with heavy equipment (not many footrests at Squaw). Still, with Full Tilt boots, light bindings and Goode skis, I'm an old arthritic believer.

 

With that said, the tweaks from mistakes or falls hurt more than normal skiing wear. Do lots of quad tighteners or wall sits to protect those knees.

 

Eric

post #5 of 7

try skiing the soft bumps on the race tigers and see how it feels on your legs overall.  my experience was that soft snow does wonders for your legs. 

 

on my past 2 trips, i found myself seeking out off piste and pow bumps versus groomed because of knee, foot and ankle pains. 

 

does anyone think that the trend toward wider skis exacerbates leg pain issues?

post #6 of 7


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tekweezle View Post 

 

does anyone think that the trend toward wider skis exacerbates leg pain issues?


If you are skidding then a wide ski will put a lot more strain on your knees than a narrower ski will. We all skid a little at times, but if you regularly get your skis on edge by pushing the ski out from under you then wide skis will PUNISH your knees.

post #7 of 7

^^^^ Truth. Also, takes more force, time, to get a wider ski up on edge. That force travels from hip through knee to ski. Some threads on physics of this. Which may be one reason why we don't all use waterskis in pow, Shane notwithstanding...

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Lightweight equipment and knee pain