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post #31 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

Ahh, gotcha, so she should be looking for somehting with good cusion as well?
 



 


Not sure, we have different problems with the same joint. A bit of a rocker sole is good for hallux rigidus, and the cushion is good for sesamoid pain. I do have a friend with bunions who wears FitFlops, so they're worth trying, I guess.

 

post #32 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowmiser View Post

Just having the covers over my toe at night hurts. 

That is such the classic symptom. "OMG! THE SHEET TOUCHED MY TOE!!!!" It hurts so much, but it's so weird.

 

Hang in there, hope recovery speeds up. All I know is the more you stay off it, the less it will bleed, and the less it will swell. Can you get a babysitter?
 

 

post #33 of 49

Thank you Finndog and SMJ.  I've been icing it all day and am starting to feel a little better.  It's just so stiff that it's really hard to walk.  I've been hopping all over the place.  Should help to improve my one-footed skiing!roflmao.gif

post #34 of 49

This is one you indulge. stay off it, as Seg said. no need to work it now. elevation. opposite of hopping. chill and get well.

post #35 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowmiser View Post

Thank you Finndog and SMJ.  I've been icing it all day and am starting to feel a little better.  It's just so stiff that it's really hard to walk.  I've been hopping all over the place.  Should help to improve my one-footed skiing!roflmao.gif


Good luck with the recovery, Snowmiser. 

 

When I had my chilectomy, I stayed on the couch or in bed with the foot elevated and iced for a week if I remember correctly.  My wife joked that it was the most INactive I'd been in the 40 years we've known each other.  I actually kind of enjoyed it.

 

My surgery was very effective in relieving the pain and making it easier to wear shoes/boots.  I don't think that I had any better mobility or range of motion in the joint, but it was much less painful post-surgery.  The mildly bad news is that the calcium deposits do seem to be returning, although they're far from reaching the outlandish size they had before the surgery.

 

I really think you should stay off that foot for as long as you can.  

 

post #36 of 49

I really didn't expect this to be a big recovery.  You guys have me convinced to take it easy though!  Thanks for the advice Bob, Seg, SMJ and Davluri.  I'm pretty sure my foot's telling me the same thing.  My 2 year old goes to preschool today, so I'm going to chill all day...literally!  The ice has been very helpful! 

post #37 of 49

I've had two specialists look at my toe and refuse to do a chielectomy because my situation is too advanced.  Only choice is fusion.  I've been told 12 weeks recovery and this is right foot so no driving to work for 12 weeks.  That's problem one.  Problem two is I'm not sure what kind of ski boot I'll ever be able to get into with big toe fused in a slight "rockered" position.  At some point I will have to have this done as the bone spur "mass" continues to grow...
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

interesting, I think Greg would be very interested in hearing more.



 

post #38 of 49


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by gregmerz View Post

I've had two specialists look at my toe and refuse to do a chielectomy because my situation is too advanced.  Only choice is fusion.  I've been told 12 weeks recovery and this is right foot so no driving to work for 12 weeks.  That's problem one.  Problem two is I'm not sure what kind of ski boot I'll ever be able to get into with big toe fused in a slight "rockered" position.  At some point I will have to have this done as the bone spur "mass" continues to grow...
 



 

 

I'd keep going to doctors. My original surgeon told me that he could only take out the implant and fuse the toe (I had the replacement, but then the joint space closed back up, so I'm still banging things together), so I went to another doctor, because I really don't want a fusion either. He agreed that getting into any sort of decent ski boot would be problematic. And the months of no driving is a deal breaker at this point.

 

So -- are you a candidate for a joint replacement? And if not, my current doctor suggested a new procedure that he just started doing last April, and so far he has good success. It involves removing cartilage from a non-weight-bearing part of your knee and implanting it in the toe. (He said I could still do this, too; he would just remove my implant.)  It's worth looking into, if it's something you haven't heard of already...

 

post #39 of 49

It's amazing how many people out there have this condition.  Segbrown and gremerz, did you have injuries to the foot that is affected by this or did it just develop?  I had a prior injury that I was told contributed to the problem.

post #40 of 49

I inquired about the chielectomy because the bone mass is large, it drives all footwear purchases and causes some day to day discomfort.  The both told me that while removing the bone spurs would obviously reduce the mass, they expected my pain level would go up as there's no cartilage left in the joint and the bone spurs do reduce range of motion.  Neither of the guys were advocates of joint replacement and one suggested that should the replacement not be successful, then you have a real mess on your hands.

 

I may just have to do the fusion in a couple years.  My nephew will graduate from HS and I could hire him as my chauffeur for the 12 week period.  Even with a fused joint I think I could get into the Dalbello Kryptons due to the shell design.  Uggh, can't somebody just fix my toe ??? 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post


 

 

I'd keep going to doctors. My original surgeon told me that he could only take out the implant and fuse the toe (I had the replacement, but then the joint space closed back up, so I'm still banging things together), so I went to another doctor, because I really don't want a fusion either. He agreed that getting into any sort of decent ski boot would be problematic. And the months of no driving is a deal breaker at this point.

 

So -- are you a candidate for a joint replacement? And if not, my current doctor suggested a new procedure that he just started doing last April, and so far he has good success. It involves removing cartilage from a non-weight-bearing part of your knee and implanting it in the toe. (He said I could still do this, too; he would just remove my implant.)  It's worth looking into, if it's something you haven't heard of already...

 



 

post #41 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowmiser View Post

It's amazing how many people out there have this condition.  Segbrown and gremerz, did you have injuries to the foot that is affected by this or did it just develop?  I had a prior injury that I was told contributed to the problem.


Mine just developed, but both of my parents have it, and my aunt and my cousin. So I hit the genetic jackpot. The fact that I didn't have a major prior injury but all my cartilage was gone in that toe, though, was a surprise to the doctors, due to my age. They said they don't see it in people as young as I was unless there has been some trauma. I played a lot of soccer growing up, so I know there were aches and pains with my feet, but I never broke anything. (That I can remember, anyway -- I think I'd remember that....)

 

My dad was 66 when he had his replacement, and my aunt was 68, I think. My mother opted out of any surgery, just used orthotics, and is better, but still has the spurs on both feet. It was weird because it all happened to us at about the same time. I was just 30 years younger than they were.

 

post #42 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregmerz View Post

I inquired about the chielectomy because the bone mass is large, it drives all footwear purchases and causes some day to day discomfort.  The both told me that while removing the bone spurs would obviously reduce the mass, they expected my pain level would go up as there's no cartilage left in the joint and the bone spurs do reduce range of motion.  Neither of the guys were advocates of joint replacement and one suggested that should the replacement not be successful, then you have a real mess on your hands.

 

I may just have to do the fusion in a couple years.  My nephew will graduate from HS and I could hire him as my chauffeur for the 12 week period.  Even with a fused joint I think I could get into the Dalbello Kryptons due to the shell design.  Uggh, can't somebody just fix my toe ??? 
 



 


Seriously, I would look into that new procedure my doctor is doing, where they put your own cartilage in. Worst case is that it doesn't work, and then they have to fuse your toe. But that's going to happen anyway, and that is irreversible, so might as well try something first? His name is Paul Stone, works at Advanced Orthopedics here in CO.

 

My sympathies, it's an enormous drag.

 

post #43 of 49

You guys were so right about the importance of keeping your foot elevated and ice.  I am finally off of the Percocet and am finally able to walk.  (At least it somewhat looks like walking). redface.gif.  I can move my big toe much better than before and without pain other than the stitches pulling.  I'm anxious to see how much more ROM I have in that toe when I'm all healed.  I'm glad I went through with the surgery, but wasn't expecting the recovery to be this much.  I'm pretty sure that having to chase my 2 year old around didn't help things much though.  rolleyes.gif

post #44 of 49

Well what do you expect from a Level III 2 year old after all?

post #45 of 49

LOL!roflmao.gif

post #46 of 49

As I recall she attended the exam, right?

post #47 of 49

Glad to hear you're on the road to recovery, Anne.   One of my daughters (they're "Old Ladies" now) stubbed her big toe a couple years ago and broke a bone.  She ignored it until a couple months ago, when she had a surgical repair.  She only has to chase dogs, so she was able to behave regarding elevation and icing, but had lots of concerns about oozing blood the first few days. 

 

Recovering from foot surgeries is a serious matter.  The feet do ALL the work for us.  I've never understood why we abuse them so badly, especially with strange shoes.

post #48 of 49

Yes she did SMJ!  That's why her nickname is "Goldie"!  She's a Level III by default!wink.gif

 

I had a lot of oozing blood too Kneale.  Pretty much every time I put my foot down.  The surgical sight was also really red and warm to the touch.  The ice really helped with that though. I don't get the stitches out until May 17th.  That ought to feel really good getting those out!eek.gif  NOT!!!! 

 

 


Edited by Snowmiser - 5/2/11 at 9:02am
post #49 of 49

I was three weeks post op. on Monday and am now having more pain walking then last week.  Wasn't expecting that.  mad.gif  I'm hoping that it's just because the stitches are pulling, but I had to take my pain meds last night for the first time in two weeks.  I finally called the doc yesterday because my stitches are getting pretty buried in my skin.  I not only have the stitches on my big toe, but also the second toe and little piggy.  They took off a large bone spur off of the second toe that kept rubbing on my shoes and also got rid of a painful area on the little toe.  I figured since they were already in there, I might as well have them fix the other areas that cause pretty bad hot spots in my ski boots and shoes.  I wanted to get my money's worth.redface.gif  When I called, the doctor's assistant decided that she had scheduled my suture removal a week later than it should have been.  eek.gif  I tried telling her that when I scheduled, but the Percocet made me a little foggy, so I figured she probably knew more than me at that point.  I get the stitches out tomorrow.  Hopefully everything is o.k. with the big toe.  I'm not a happy camper about the way I'm walking at this point!

 

 

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