New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

In-store ski durability?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

Will skis that stay 1-2years closed up in a ski store have their performance affected? Might be getting head SS magnums, any chance of the chip or wood core being weakened due to the prolonged period of not being used?

 

post #2 of 28


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by leopinto View Post

Will skis that stay 1-2years closed up in a ski store have their performance affected? Might be getting head SS magnums, any chance of the chip or wood core being weakened due to the prolonged period of not being used?

 


No and No.

 

post #3 of 28

I'll just add, that this situation usually equals a big discount.  The skis are exactly the same as when they cost 3X as much.  These are newer than anything I am currently skiing on (yes, I need to deal with that), and are probably before that latest fad of reverse camber.  That is not necessarily a bad thing, depending on the model and intended mission.

post #4 of 28

Ask if the ski were stored near any computers or High Voltage lines. High Frequency e-noise (EMI)  and electronics fields from AC lines can seriously compromise/degrade the Chip. You don't want those skis if the chip is bad. On the other hand, the Wood core should be fine unless the ski ever sat in standing water. Also Check the store for Radon gas. Radon gas can clog the cores in the Graphite bases and really slow the skis down.

post #5 of 28

Is the chip actually a processor? confused.gif If so, what are its functions and inputs/outputs? I've been so skeptical about this technology since its release, mostly because the "data" I've seen about it is veiled in marketing hype and gyntastic claims of humongorous ski performance improvement. But I'd like to be enlightened (if that's possible; some of my old college profs would call that a lost cause...)

post #6 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post

I'll just add, that this situation usually equals a big discount.  The skis are exactly the same as when they cost 3X as much.  These are newer than anything I am currently skiing on (yes, I need to deal with that), and are probably before that latest fad of reverse camber.  That is not necessarily a bad thing, depending on the model and intended mission.



Or you could just buy an 6 year old ski and save 90%. 

post #7 of 28

If you are buying the ski new from a store, even though a few years old, it should still be covered under the manufacturers warranty.  In 2009 I bought "new" 2003 Elan GSX race stock.  Called Elan and they told me they had the same one year warranty since they were sold new.  I believe all manufacturers do this so your risk should be very low (if they are not being sold as "used").

 

And like Ghost said, I saved 90%.  According to the Elan Rep the 2010 version was up over $1000 and I paid $99. 

 

The only issue the skis have is the chubby grouch on top of them.

post #8 of 28

Nord, not saying you are wrong at all but where did you get this stuff?

 

The radon thing is pretty wild.  Really, I have to have a source for this.  I have had dealings with some radon issues, the worst selling a house at the bottom of the LD (limit of analytic detection not lethal dose), but never heard of materials breakdown from it.  There is a marked difference between cancer and cell breakdown.

 

In theory we could say that flying with ski boots in the cabin carry on exposes them to EMF and solar radiation.

 

All of the stuff on EMF and the effects of high voltage lines had been pretty much debunked ages ago.  I would not live next to high voltage lines because the hummmmmmmmm drives me nuts.

 

Regarding chips, because something is measurable does not mean a thing.  I would love to see a study where blind skiers test them and report on the validity of chips.  eek.gif

 

In one fell swoop, molasses killed more citizens in a single incident from secondary exposure to this industrial hazard.  They dropped like flies.  popcorn.gif

post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post

 

 

 

 

Regarding chips, because something is measurable does not mean a thing.  I would love to see a study where blind skiers test them and report on the validity of chips. 

 

 


I think the proper term is "visually challenged". duck.gif

 

post #10 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Is the chip actually a processor? confused.gif If so, what are its functions and inputs/outputs? I've been so skeptical about this technology since its release. But I'd like to be enlightened (if that's possible; some of my old college profs would call that a lost cause...)


Not sure exactly, each chip and manufacturer seek different outcomes. I know that the magnum's technology senses when the skis are under speed and as a response forces the ski to become slightly stiffer. If you read some reviews about the ski, you'll see some people mention how the ski improves in stability drastically when under higher speeds, possibly due to the chip's functioning. Good luck on finding out though, a google research will bring some info up... Not to be rude, but its possible some old timers don't like the idea for reasons not based on the real outcomes...

 

post #11 of 28

Yuki

Google "Ski  bases radon gas"

For my sources.

post #12 of 28

I have a couple of degrees in electronics. Those chips are a complete fantasy of marketing.

post #13 of 28

I Googled it. What came up? This thread.

 

 

 

Dave

 

 

 

post #14 of 28

Are you serious?  I'm hoping not, or I have to call BS on this.  The skis would have to be stored directly on top of a high voltage line or inside a large server room to even have a CHANCE of showing any effect from EMF emissions.  EMF fields from lower voltage lines or computers have VERY limited ranges.

 

Mike
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NordtheBarbarian View Post

Ask if the ski were stored near any computers or High Voltage lines. High Frequency e-noise (EMI)  and electronics fields from AC lines can seriously compromise/degrade the Chip. You don't want those skis if the chip is bad. On the other hand, the Wood core should be fine unless the ski ever sat in standing water. Also Check the store for Radon gas. Radon gas can clog the cores in the Graphite bases and really slow the skis down.



 

post #15 of 28

So we stick these things on our feet with all of our weight on them, torquing and pulling and flexing while carving them over ice and hard snow for thousands of vertical feet.  And they can't stand up to a little EMF and some storage?  I can understand it wouldn't be good if they were stored in 110 degree heat, but other than that...

 

Maybe I have no idea what I'm talking about, but that seems somewhat ridiculous.

post #16 of 28

Radon and slow bases?  phwooohee!  Another  urban myth!

And I did search the string...made me want to return to the Gastein Valley for some bubbly radiation treatments ;-)

 

I would like to know what goes on with "chip tech" however.

 

The most I could  imagine is a frequency selective RC circuit that either "dumps" mechanical energy that has been converted to electrical energy  Ah-La, old K2 (piezo) technology, or re-routes generated electrical energy into some magneto-rheological material (Liquid-metal) to "stiffen" things up.  but really can only add damping.

 

Either way,  when I do a rough order of magnitude energy dissipation study, I only can conclude that as far as "chips" and skis are concerned,  most of the magic smoke must have gone to the heads of marketing. 

 

But as mentioned.  I would like to know, rather than conjecture.

 

Cheers

 

 


Edited by Cgrandy - 5/6/11 at 10:59am
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by NordtheBarbarian View Post

Ask if the ski were stored near any computers or High Voltage lines. High Frequency e-noise (EMI)  and electronics fields from AC lines can seriously compromise/degrade the Chip. You don't want those skis if the chip is bad. On the other hand, the Wood core should be fine unless the ski ever sat in standing water. Also Check the store for Radon gas. Radon gas can clog the cores in the Graphite bases and really slow the skis down.



I can see the sarcasm all the way from here

post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by NordtheBarbarian View Post

Ask if the ski were stored near any computers or High Voltage lines. High Frequency e-noise (EMI)  and electronics fields from AC lines can seriously compromise/degrade the Chip. You don't want those skis if the chip is bad. On the other hand, the Wood core should be fine unless the ski ever sat in standing water. Also Check the store for Radon gas. Radon gas can clog the cores in the Graphite bases and really slow the skis down.



 



Quote:
Originally Posted by csavage View Post





I can see the sarcasm all the way from here



 

21PFo-K9hSL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

post #19 of 28

Similar question here.

 

Never used 5 year old model Völkl AC4, much cheaper than AC50 or AC30. So you say that they didn't lose their tension over the years? The seller/Völkl gives 2 years warranty.

post #20 of 28

You should ask the store or Vokl about the validity of the warranty.  When I talked to Elan about the skis in my post above, he stated that skis don't go bad on the shelf.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by squirlo View Post

Similar question here.

 

Never used 5 year old model Völkl AC4, much cheaper than AC50 or AC30. So you say that they didn't lose their tension over the years? The seller/Völkl gives 2 years warranty.



 

 

post #21 of 28

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

You should ask the store or Vokl about the validity of the warranty.  When I talked to Elan about the skis in my post above, he stated that skis don't go bad on the shelf.


Thanks. I will call Völkl on Monday to make sure.

 

post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

You should ask the store or Vokl about the validity of the warranty.  When I talked to Elan about the skis in my post above, he stated that skis don't go bad on the shelf.

 



 

 


Unless the shelf is made of kryptonite. Then all bets are off.

 

post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post


Unless the shelf is made of kryptonite. Then all bets are off.

 



Au contraire mon frere!

 

Kryptonite only affects living things.  Yes I checked.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kryptonite

 

 

And it a good thing because these are my boots -

 

 

Krypton boot.bmp

 

 

 

 

post #24 of 28


 

Background radiation does erase EPROMS and flash memories.      The device is perfectly functional, at least the hard wired part is.    The data on it is randomized, "data" here conceivably including microprogramming internal to processors and FPGA definitions.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post

Nord, not saying you are wrong at all but where did you get this stuff?

 

The radon thing is pretty wild.  Really, I have to have a source for this.  I have had dealings with some radon issues, the worst selling a house at the bottom of the LD (limit of analytic detection not lethal dose), but never heard of materials breakdown from it.  There is a marked difference between cancer and cell breakdown.



 

post #25 of 28

I hear Nordica will be producing skis that have built in 'radon detection' circuitry, for people who are concerned about this exact problem.

The detector will add about $200 to the cost of the skis.

 

K2 is also working on a flex counter. This is a processor that counts the number of flexes (edge changes basically). After a certain number or cycles the skis will turn to noodles and need to be replaced.

 

Oh, there is also something in the pipeline for replaceable edges. When they dull, no sharpening needed, just swap in new edges. Right now they are single edges, but you will see dual and even triple edges, for getting super close to the snow...

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by squirlo View Post

Similar question here.

 

Never used 5 year old model Völkl AC4, much cheaper than AC50 or AC30. So you say that they didn't lose their tension over the years? The seller/Völkl gives 2 years warranty.


The ski itself should be fine.  Just remember that skis get a little better every year and the AC4 was the tail end of a very long design run. 

 

post #27 of 28

nm

post #28 of 28

I just bought a few skis that my local ski shop were selling for peanuts, they got hold of a load of old stock from a shop which went bankrupt and these must have been lying around at the back of their store....

 

Dynastar Speed SX 178 (red and white stripes)

Head Team SL 150 (the old silver model)

Dynastar SG team course 204

 

I paid a bit under 10% of the original list price. I thought I really couldn't go far wrong at that price. I could never really justify buying SG skis for myself at full price, but at 90% discount the world seems a different place. The Speed SX will get used by my daughter as a junior SG ski at a speed camp. It's a little bit bit turny, but she's not so big or aggressive and it's still a pretty stable ski at speed. Plus the courses that get set at that camp are always more like a fast GS than SG just to keep speeds down. Anyway, she can try them for a day and see whether she likes them. If they are not suitable we can look for something else. Or my wife might try them as a GS cheater for parent's races, she has a pair of Rossignol 9x Wold Cup but finds them a bit of a handful.

 

I'm sure the Head SL will get skied.....someone in the family will find it in the rack and give it a try :-)

 

I also took a chance on a pair of Salomon Falcon SC Pros for my my eldest son who has moved away. I found them at the bottom of a heap of boot boxes going for approx 75$ a throw. I don't think that box was supposed to be in that pile, but the guys in the shop gave me a grin and I got the deal. If they don't fit I'm sure we can sell them on for that price.

 

Mark

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion