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Did they feel no cold?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Look at the photos from the golden age of skiing.   No helmets, often no hats for that matter, wool pants, turtle neck and a snazzy sweater.   Nowadays in the age of "global warming" many of us go skiing with enough gear to make us look like we are going on a arctic expedition, I am no exception.   So are all these photos we see just shot in the Spring, are people just impervious, or are basically all the shots just staged?

 

I for one think that things looked much more elegant in the old days, even in the 80's with the wild colors ski gear gave you a nice silhouette, trim waste, broad shoulders.  Now we are all boxes....most lamented is the loss of the tight ski pants that all the ladies used to wear.

 

Our new gear might work better but sure looks much worse.

 

 

art-look_380x300.jpg 80s_skifashion.jpg bear_creek_skiers_and_snow_boarders.jpg

 

 

 


Edited by Richie-Rich - 4/19/11 at 8:40am
post #2 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post

 Now we are all boxes....most lamented is the loss of the tight ski pants that all the ladies used to wear.

 

Our new gear might work better but sure looks much worse.


Are the onesie isn't the look you miss the most? wink.gif

 

langeposter%2Btips%2Bup.jpg

 

post #3 of 21

They skied a lot slower and mostly in fair weather.  Klaus Obermeyer started making ski wear so that his students could actually stay outside in inclement weather and take lessons!

post #4 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

They skied a lot slower and mostly in fair weather.  Klaus Obermeyer started making ski wear so that his students could actually stay outside in inclement weather and take lessons!

We may have skied slower because we had no grooming, hence conditions were tougher, our equipment was pretty crude, didn't even always have metal edges.  As far as skiing mostly in fair weather, that's just BS.  We were tough back in the day.  Man, we climbed for our turns before the wonderful rope tow was developed.  Ever try skiing all day in wet wool clothing, wet leather mitts, with your arms coming out of their sockets from all the rope tow rides?  As I said, skiers were tough back in the day,  The men too.
 

 

post #5 of 21

Most slopes we know especially here in the NE are facing north and get little direct sun so the snow stays longer.

 

Mount Snow is the best exception I can think of and was planned as an alternate to the cold areas like Stowe. 

 

Squaw I think was another exception in the west and had a lot of this type of photo op.  I'll stand corrected but there were a few like this that drew the celeb Hollywood crowd to the warmer sunny slopes.

 

On the sunny slopes, the pants were of wool loden.  That dark green of the Austrians feels like it sucks the heat of the sun and your legs will feel hot even when the thermometer is at 25.  Aside from wool there was always wool.  Very warm and even when a bit damp.

 

Try a green loden wool garment one sunny cold day, you will be amazed.

post #6 of 21

I read where Obermeyer made his first down cape so people could endure the long chairlift ride in cold weather (Colorado I think, the cape was only used on the lift).

 

I had the classic parka in the mid 1960's. It was mid thigh length, belted, navy blue, down filled, MADE IN COLORADO by Alpsport. Very warm.

 

Many of the ski sweater shots are obviously taken in the sunshine. A nice sweater was a valued piece, with the Scandanavian patterns very popular in the early 60's.

 

Wool is superior to some of today's less high tech garments. As I recall the boots were the weak link.

 

I REALLY miss stretch pants (women's). I think part of the focus of a change in fashion (1990's ?) was to blow away the tight clothing look that went so well with skiing with feet together, associated with the conservative Austrian domination of the sport.

post #7 of 21

Personally, I don't miss stretch pants.  Cold as hell.  Had my first pair in the early 70's, bought another pair in the late 80's, thinking technology MUST have improved.  Wrong.  Had to put a windshell over them.  The only place they were wearable was spring in CO.

post #8 of 21

I had a nice pair of "White Stag" stretch wool ski pants in the early 80's  (in loden green, but not boiled wool like real loden cloth)

 

They were as warm as could be...

 

but I couldn't handle all the comments about my "nice butt" ;-)

 

 

 

 

Cal

post #9 of 21

Well right away, the thing that occurs to me is that a lot of that skiing was, by our current definition, touring. My Mom skied back in the 40s and 50s, and said lots of times it was just hiking up with skis over the shoulder. You don't get real cold doing that.

You probably burned a fair number of calories trying to hang on to a rope tow, too. I think you stay warmer on any surface lift than on uncovered chairs, as your muscles are working a bit and you're lower down so more protected from the wind.

 

If you look at old photos like this from Europe, a lot of the ski areas would be covered by surface lifts, trams (so indoor) or even trains.

 

There's a photo at a bar in Madesimo of a cable-pulled sled that served the area in the old days, and everyone's covered by blankets for the ride up.

 

Finally, maybe in those days you didn't freeze in liftlines... because there weren't any?

post #10 of 21

Back in the day people used film cameras.  It took time and money to see your pics.  Just snapping away like we do now in the digital age was almost unheard of.  People would set up a shot, make sure the light was right (think springtime sun) and then take it.  I suspect that after a number of these pictures were taken the hats and coats came back out.

post #11 of 21
Quote:
If you look at old photos like this from Europe, a lot of the ski areas would be covered by surface lifts, trams (so indoor) or even trains.

They still are, it turns out...

 

'Old' gear isn't particularly cold.  Down and wool are both really, really good insulators, especially when layered.  They're just not windproof AND waterproof AND warm AND breathable AND quick-drying.

post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by JTNSKIS View Post

We may have skied slower because we had no grooming, hence conditions were tougher, our equipment was pretty crude, didn't even always have metal edges.  As far as skiing mostly in fair weather, that's just BS...Ever try skiing all day in wet wool clothing, wet leather mitts, with your arms coming out of their sockets from all the rope tow rides?  


^^^^ Right track. News flash, in fact: It used to be on average colder. This is termed climate change. Global warming. And yeah, I used to ski Squaw in a light wool sweater like that, a nylon shell for the cold days, nylon stretch pants, no longies. But IMO, the two big differences were that 1) We did far less actual skiing, at lower speeds, and far more waiting in line at the bottom or sitting in lifts (where I recall being super cold at times), or having lunch. And 2) We had different expectations. Don't know it's about being "tougher," but since we had never experienced the wonders of having a sub-tropical environment next to our skin in 10 degree weather, our brains didn't lock up and say "whoaa! this is actually cold." We just experienced the cold sensation as part of skiing. If it got down to 10 or so, we went inside, instead of adding a layer. Or  not: Did anyone ever visit the sad pics of Mallory's body on the north side of Everest? He was climbing in one of the world's harshest places wearing flannel shirt, wool sweater under wool jacket, wool pants + longies, leather hobnail boots. That was cutting edge in the 20's: No oxygen, no down, no poly wick layers, no fleece...

 

post #13 of 21

Can remember the car smelling like a sheep shed on the drive home from the mountains back in the 50s' as a kid in the Cascades.  By today's standards the stuff was primitive but it worked pretty well, we still skied bell to bell.

 

We had wool liners inside the split leather mitts for the rope tows, the dead air space kept you warm even as the liners got wet.

2 pairs of socks in the leather boots for wicking action and forget custom boot fitting.  I can remember the guys fitting you in the stores going up 1/2 to a full size for socks, because tight boots were cold feet.

Layers, lots of layers with something very tightly woven for top layer.  Tee shirt, thermal, shirt, sweater, coat/windbreaker.

A hat, unless you were Stein Erickson,

 

The lift capes started at Sun Valley in the 30s' with the first chairlifts.  Some places form can out-weigh function, especially for the Hollywood starlets.    Same note 40 years latter; some of the free stylers of the early 70s' would wear pantyhose ipo base layers for a tighter fit on the strech pants.

 

To get real old school Google the traditional Eskimo/Inuit clothing.  We today have got nothing on those folks.

 

post #14 of 21

One thing you don't see in the old photos is old folks like a lot of us.  Skiing was a young person's sport, and when you're in your 20s you can/will put up with a lot more discomfort that when you're old and gray.

post #15 of 21

Naaaahhh..

People were tougher back in the day.. We are big wussies.

Remember the crazy Italian guy AKA Piero Gross??? No hat, no goggles and still manages to win SL in a heavy snowfall....

On the other hand warm-up accelerators like cognac, brandy etc; were widely used......beercheer.gif

post #16 of 21

My memories of skiing go back to 1967.  There were no camelbak hydration systems back then.  On cold days people went in more often for hot chocolate or hot toddiessmile.gif Since I skied in the East, there was always a lodge nearby for a quick warm-up break.  I don't remember being that cold, it was more about how icy the slopes were because snowmaking was so crude and there was a lot of boilerplate ice during low natural periods.  I remember ski gear (skis, bindings, goggle lens, boot buckles or laces) breaking more often than nowadays.  Wool stretch pants with long johns underneath were good for almost any temps.  Down jackets and especially down mittens seemed to come in sometime in the early 70s and were real good.  Skiing in cold rain was tough and still is.  I still wear fairly low tech clothing in layers, although I've acquired some north face hyvent garments in my search for more waterproof outer layers.  no goretex yet for me.  Besides the aesthetics with respect to stretch pants worn by women, as a guy I found wearing stretch pants to be very comfortable for active skiing such as moguls or doing the little tricks in my aerial repertoire.  I occasionally wore stretch pants as late as March 2000 eek.gif:

4668491.jpg

 

There are some great photos of old ski fashionistas in this thread from last year:  http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/94858/vintage-ski-action-photos-from-life-magazine

post #17 of 21


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post

Look at the photos from the golden age of skiing.   No helmets, often no hats for that matter, wool pants, turtle neck and a snazzy sweater.   Nowadays in the age of "global warming" many of us go skiing with enough gear to make us look like we are going on a arctic expedition, I am no exception.   So are all these photos we see just shot in the Spring, are people just impervious, or are basically all the shots just staged?

 

I for one think that things looked much more elegant in the old days, even in the 80's with the wild colors ski gear gave you a nice silhouette, trim waste, broad shoulders.  Now we are all boxes....most lamented is the loss of the tight ski pants that all the ladies used to wear.

 

Our new gear might work better but sure looks much worse.

 

 

art-look_380x300.jpg 80s_skifashion.jpg

 

 

 


April 19, 2011

 

Wow Oh Wow Oh Wow:

 

Is that Gary Copper (2nd from right) and Clark Gable (1st from right) in the B&W photo?  Wonder who the two Babes are.  One elegant, the other cute.  How about Mr. 1945?  Must be some kind of ski god for that year and I guess this picture was taken at Sun Valley  (wouldn't think of being caught at that new area in Colorado, rubbing shoulders with the serfs, what's it's name? Aspen or Vail?  Whatever.  I know, Aspen was founded until 1946, Vail even later).

 

No wonder the people in the B&W picture look SO MUCH better than the kids in the other picture.  Dig those "rear entry" boots and the person in those boots.  Makes you "ski better" biggrin.gifwink.gifsmile.gif is what the sales man told me at the Gray Rocks ski shop (about the boots, not the skier wearing the boots) eek.gifroflmao.gificon13.gif.

 

Think snow,

 

CP

 


Edited by CharlieP - 4/19/11 at 1:07pm
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by JTNSKIS View Post



We may have skied slower because we had no grooming, hence conditions were tougher, our equipment was pretty crude, didn't even always have metal edges.  As far as skiing mostly in fair weather, that's just BS.  We were tough back in the day.  Man, we climbed for our turns before the wonderful rope tow was developed.  Ever try skiing all day in wet wool clothing, wet leather mitts, with your arms coming out of their sockets from all the rope tow rides?  As I said, skiers were tough back in the day,  The men too.
 

 


Should also add, "the women beautiful".  I remember the arms coming out of the sockets but not the "climbing" for turns.  Some hardcore skiers still do todayicon14.gif.

 

Think snow,

 

CP

 

post #19 of 21

The pic is at Sun Valley in 1946 and ..

 

Mrs. Gary Cooper, Jack Hemmingway, Ingrid Bergman, Gary Cooper and Clark Gable ..... I of course was taking the photo and ...duck.gif

 

Hit ... Google Images for a lot more too.

post #20 of 21


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post

The pic is at Sun Valley in 1946 and ..

 

Mrs. Gary Cooper, Jack Hemmingway, Ingrid Bergman, Gary Cooper and Clark Gable ..... I of course was taking the photo and ...duck.gif

 

Hit ... Google Images for a lot more too.


April 19, 2011

 

Thanks Yuki.  Knew that I could count on you to provide info about the picture.  Jack Hemmingway, related to the "Old Man and the Sea" Hemmingway?  If you were taking the picture, you were probably around when the Jefferson Starship began as  the Jefferson Hot Air Balloon biggrin.gifwink.gif.

 

Wow, oh wow, oh wow  just wasn't enough.  Should have repeated it four times smile.gif.

 

By the way, finally broke down and got a pair of Stocklis.  Have been kicking myself in the rear end ever since.  Should have broken down much earlier.  As the sales man said "Makes you ski better" biggrin.gif. as well as "Makes your skis better"icon14.gifroflmao.gif.

 

Think snow,

 

CP

 

post #21 of 21

They are smooth aren't they.  You'll look like Fred Astaire on ice now too.  Congrats.  ski.gif

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