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Manually fixing base burn?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hi guys,

 

My skis have some base burn and don't seem to be absorbing wax properly. (ie wax the night before, and by the end of the day the wax is dried up.) I've seen much worse base burn but it's affecting things. 

 

Can I fix base burn with any cost-effective tool? Say, a brass brush or something? Or does it absolutely require a shop base grind? 

post #2 of 10
Not sure what you use to heat your house, but if you have a wood stove (poor mans hot box) you can place the skis next to it for an hour or so to heat the base. Or you can try next to you furnace if it is nice and toasty. If all else fails use a hair dryer on low.. You want to get the base up to around 120 degrees and then hit with a brass brush lightly. You are trying to clean you the structure not redefine it. Then use a basic wax, like a ch6, and iron it on while the ski is warm. Again, put it next to a heat source for 6 hours. Try to keep th base at 120 to 130 degrees. After 6 hours, let the ski cool, scrape then brush...

If that does not help, you are going to have to run them across a machine....
post #3 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Hi guys,

 

My skis have some base burn and don't seem to be absorbing wax properly. (ie wax the night before, and by the end of the day the wax is dried up.) I've seen much worse base burn but it's affecting things. 

 

Can I fix base burn with any cost-effective tool? Say, a brass brush or something? Or does it absolutely require a shop base grind? 

 

If you mean you're getting some grey on the bases, you can get rid of those fuzzies with some light use of a fibertex pad, as long as it isn't too bad.  I've done this on a couple of occasions, and didn't abrade the bases too much. (check with a true bar)

 

I do find that the more you wax a ski after a grind, the less wax it absorbs.  After a fresh grind, my bases are almost like sponges.  As I get more wax into the them, they absorb less.  It's also possible your bases are dirty though, in which case a hot scrape or three might help.

post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the ideas guys! Yup there's definitely some gray on the base near the edges. No wood stove here, so I'll try the easy option/cheap first (fibertex pad). Then a hot wax (the base isn't particularly awful in the middle, but it still won't hold wax, so maybe it is dirty). Then maybe a hair dryer and brass brush if it's still not holding. Then the stone grind if absolutely necessary. 

 

Ah, it's nice living on the mountain, but gee, the things you have to do to save money!

post #5 of 10

This is how I do it.

post #6 of 10
Another resuscitation.
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 

Those skis were long ago devoured by a bump on Whistler ;) Jacque's video is still invaluable! 

 

During the structuring step, you don't seem really worried about the randomness and imperfect structure that's getting scraped in. Is a structuring with a machine more consistent and does it provide a more predictable ride, or is it pretty much the same whether done by hand or by machine? 


Edited by Metaphor_ - 1/14/14 at 7:41pm
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

Those skis were long ago devoured by a bump on Whistler ;) Jacque's video is still invaluable! 

 

During the structuring step, you don't seem really worried about the randomness and imperfect structure that's getting scraped in. Is a structuring with a machine more consistent and does it provide a more predictable ride, or is it pretty much the same whether done by hand or by machine? 

For me, it works super good.  All the folks I have done it for are stoked as well.  As one can see in the end of the video there is a nice lineal structure in the base.  If I want further smoothing I use stones from Boride such as the AM8 or T-2.  The stones won't flex!  I do that wet.  If you do it dry the stones will pack up.  One thing I can tell you for certain is that my skis don't lack glide.  I keep up with big folks and pass most on a flat and I am only 125 lbs.  I skied those Power S9 Rossis today and they smoked it!  I paid $60.00 for them!  Been on rock skis for 37 days prior. (even my rock skis kill it)

 

Edit:  BTW, I know the thread is old, but it came up ranking high on a search.

post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

 

During the structuring step, you don't seem really worried about the randomness and imperfect structure that's getting scraped in. Is a structuring with a machine more consistent and does it provide a more predictable ride, or is it pretty much the same whether done by hand or by machine? 

 

No its nowhere near the same.  A stone grinder will flatten and structure a ski way more consistently.  Montana states that ski glide is 20% wax, and 80% structure.

 

If the bases of your ski don't look something like this finished grind, I suggest you make it so.  Our western shop does a thousand or so race grinds for off-piste skis - backside skiers are starting to see the light.

 

Before and after 

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chenzo View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

 

During the structuring step, you don't seem really worried about the randomness and imperfect structure that's getting scraped in. Is a structuring with a machine more consistent and does it provide a more predictable ride, or is it pretty much the same whether done by hand or by machine? 

 

No its nowhere near the same.  A stone grinder will flatten and structure a ski way more consistently.  Montana states that ski glide is 20% wax, and 80% structure.

 

If the bases of your ski don't look something like this finished grind, I suggest you make it so.  Our western shop does a thousand or so race grinds for off-piste skis - backside skiers are starting to see the light.

 

Before and after 


80 20, I'll go for that.  That's why my scraped and brush structured skis run well.  I have seen fresh ground skis that run slow as well.  After a grind much work is still needed.  Be good up there.


Edited by Jacques - 8/8/16 at 1:06pm
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