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Basic tuning tips (and comparisons) - Page 2

post #31 of 36

I've been looking at these threads with interest as I'm getting ready to buy some new tuning tools.  I've tuned my own skis in the past but it was a pretty rudimentary approach.  I've been missing the nice sharp edges when I come across some solid hardpack or ice and am tired of trying to find a shop that does a good job consistently. 

 

So, a couple of questions and opinions:

 

1.  Side edges or base edges first?  I've seen it both ways but makes more sense to do base first as noted above.

2.  Sounds like base bevel of 1 side of 2 or 3 is most common.  Is it true that if I do a base bevel of .5 or .7 I will have quicker edge engagement (ie less roll over of the ski)?

3.  Any opinion or experience on the SkiVisions Base Flattener tools?  I would like the ability to do this instead of taking to the shop most times, leaving that for maybe once a season or every other season.

4.  Opinion or experience on the SkiVisions Ski Sharp Edge tool?  Seems like most people use the dedicated bevel guides like the Beast or similar for both base and edge. Any specific recommendaitons?  I've read a bunch but starting to have it all blur together.

 

Thanks for any advice.  Seems like a Beast side edge bevel, similar for the base edge and then the appropriate files and stones.

post #32 of 36

`#1 Base First

 

#2. A true accurate 1 degree will serve you well.  And you can't go wrong with a 3 degree side edge.

 

#3  Best to have reputable shop do a professional base grind when needed

 

 

#4 Not inexpensive but SVST Final Cut dedicated base bevelers and side edge guides are the best. (the Aluminum Side edge guide with the stainless plate works great) In fact I prefer it to the solid Stainless.

 

Not a fan of the Beast side edge beveler. I owned one when I first starte tuning, but  it i limited as to the thickness of th stone you can use and is not nearly as solid as the SVST with a big spring clip.

 

 

 

 

post #33 of 36

Thanks for the input.  So do you recommend then just having a shop do a base leveling stone grind only, then use my own tools for the bevel?

 

Should be cheaper to do that as well as opposed to a full tune I would think.

post #34 of 36

Atomicman, similar question to the one asked earlier in this thread: Let's say I have some scrapes/gouges along the base edge (from sking over rocks), and a couple chips right in the sharp edge between base/side (creating gaps in the actual edge)-- should I just use the gummi to partially clean up the base? And at what point do I need to have the side filed again to remove the chips/gouges? 

 

Thanks. 

post #35 of 36

have your shop do a stone grind setting the base bevel and side bevel and wax. it doesn't really cost any different.


anywhere from 0.5 to 1 degree base and 1-3 side.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pwdrhound View Post

Thanks for the input.  So do you recommend then just having a shop do a base leveling stone grind only, then use my own tools for the bevel?

 

Should be cheaper to do that as well as opposed to a full tune I would think.



 

post #36 of 36



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by shoal007 View Post

have your shop do a stone grind setting the base bevel and side bevel and wax. it doesn't really cost any different.


anywhere from 0.5 to 1 degree base and 1-3 side.

 



 


Except that the whole idea is not to have the shop do the tune in the first place.  I've not been happy with the quality of the tune and the sharpness of the edges from the shops around town, and I don't feel like paying $30  everytime I want a sharp edge.  I want control over the tune, maybe it's a trust issue.rolleyes.gif
 

 

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