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Saying good bye to an old chairlift.

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

How often do we sit on a chair lift and say, "this old chair is slow, and drips grease, and....they should replace is with something more modern." ?

Like the old single chair at MRG, Exhibition lift at Abasin, and now the Highpoint lift at Copper

 

Then on day, they make plans to replace the old lift with a new high speed lift, we are a little sad at the loss of character when the old lift is disassembled.. 

Here is a nice tribute that Copper Mountain has done for High Point Lift

post #2 of 28

even "progress" has its trade-offs. nice feeling about that place. CII at Squaw has quite a long history, and a few others.

post #3 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

How often do we sit on a chair lift and say, "this old chair is slow, and drips grease, and....they should replace is with something more modern." ?



How often? Never.

post #4 of 28

Take a piece home with you...I also have a Yan chair like the High Point Lift.

IMG_0001.JPG

post #5 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iWill View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

How often do we sit on a chair lift and say, "this old chair is slow, and drips grease, and....they should replace is with something more modern." ?



How often? Never.

For those of us who may not have said it, we've, no doubt, heard it
post #6 of 28

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by iWill View Post

How often? Never.


I guess I'm just getting older, but when sitting on a long slow chair with tired legs in the afternoon, I've definitely found myself wishing for a foot rest.  And I'm not ashamed to admit it.

 

post #7 of 28

After my son and I had skied pretty much 7 hours straight five days in a row in Utah, I made this comment as we rode the slowest lif on the mountain on the last chair of the day:  "no matter how long this lift takes to get to the top, I'm wishing it took longer".

post #8 of 28

Yep, the new high-speed quad will be a much-needed upgrade to the Union Creek Base at Copper Mountain, but I do get a little choked up when they pull out a venerable old chair like High Point. It has served Copper skiers for a very long time. I'm glad I'm not the only one...that tribute piece is kinda cool, really, isn't it?

 

Best regards,

Bob

post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

Yep, the new high-speed quad will be a much-needed upgrade to the Union Creek Base at Copper Mountain, but I do get a little choked up when they pull out a venerable old chair like High Point. It has served Copper skiers for a very long time. I'm glad I'm not the only one...that tribute piece is kinda cool, really, isn't it?

 

Best regards,

Bob



Heh, this is what I posted yesterday when that was put up on skidiva; glad I'm not the only one :-)


"Damn, I just got all emotional watching that. Some of you know that I've been riding those old orange lifts at Copper since I was 4 years old ... and although I haven't been on High Point in some years, it was the lift we'd take with the kids after we'd pick them up from ski school, so we could take a few laps together at the end of the day. Pretty crappy lift, but still.... "

post #10 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

Yep, the new high-speed quad will be a much-needed upgrade to the Union Creek Base at Copper Mountain, but I do get a little choked up when they pull out a venerable old chair like High Point. It has served Copper skiers for a very long time. I'm glad I'm not the only one...that tribute piece is kinda cool, really, isn't it?

 

Best regards,

Bob



 



Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post





Heh, this is what I posted yesterday when that was put up on skidiva; glad I'm not the only one :-)


"Damn, I just got all emotional watching that. Some of you know that I've been riding those old orange lifts at Copper since I was 4 years old ... and although I haven't been on High Point in some years, it was the lift we'd take with the kids after we'd pick them up from ski school, so we could take a few laps together at the end of the day. Pretty crappy lift, but still.... "



This is how I felt about the Exhibition lift at Arapahoe Basin, even though I know it was time for the upgrade, it was sad to see Exhibition make its last turn.



Quote:
Originally Posted by tch View Post

After my son and I had skied pretty much 7 hours straight five days in a row in Utah, I made this comment as we rode the slowest lif on the mountain on the last chair of the day:  "no matter how long this lift takes to get to the top, I'm wishing it took longer".


That is signature worthy in its context!

 

post #11 of 28

It definitely felt a little weird when I closed my eastern ski season at Stowe a week or two ago and realized that I have ridden the old Fourrunner Quad for the last time.  I skied the mid-Atlantic for several years so Stowe was the first place I skied with more vertical than an ant-hill, and the Fourrunner was the first chair I rode at Stowe.

 

That said, I'm not sure how sorry I am to see that thing go -- definitely was showing its age.

 

And I skied at Copper twice this week...  I'll have to look at the maps to see if I rode the Highpoint chair.  Hmmmm.  Doesn't look like it.  Chairs without safety bars can always be safely retired though.  wink.gif

post #12 of 28

Nope--that's probably a lift you never got to, Kevin. It's the main ift out of the Union Creek base area--some of the best first-day-or-two-or-three skiing terrain in the country, but nowhere you'd need to be!

 

Hope you had a great week. I'm glad I got a chance to ski with you again!

 

Best regards,

Bob

post #13 of 28

I'm a nostalgic type of person, and like to preserve old things as much as possible, I also dont believe in waste.   But lifts are one place I draw the line, I have no sentiment towards replacing un-safe old, slow lifts for new, better, faster units.   Every resort should do it more often.   I am after all at the mountain to ski, not to risk and waste my life on some old, slow, unsafe, rotting pieces of steel tubing.

 

Now if a place is like MRG, where that old style lift defines it, then do as they did replace with a modern version of the same.

post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post

It definitely felt a little weird when I closed my eastern ski season at Stowe a week or two ago and realized that I have ridden the old Fourrunner Quad for the last time.  I skied the mid-Atlantic for several years so Stowe was the first place I skied with more vertical than an ant-hill, and the Fourrunner was the first chair I rode at Stowe.

 

That said, I'm not sure how sorry I am to see that thing go -- definitely was showing its age.

 

And I skied at Copper twice this week...  I'll have to look at the maps to see if I rode the Highpoint chair.  Hmmmm.  Doesn't look like it.  Chairs without safety bars can always be safely retired though.  wink.gif


and the forerunner's last day is going to close out with wind hold!s

 

post #15 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




and the forerunner's last day is going to close out with wind hold!s

 


Isn't Forerunner the one that they use when everything else is on wind hold?

 

 

post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post




Isn't Forerunner the one that they use when everything else is on wind hold?

 

 


Forerunner is the high-speed-quad on the Mansfield side of Stowe, and it is often on wind-hold.  The Lookout Double is the even older, creakier one that gets you most of the way up.

 

post #17 of 28

And then there are the old, venerable lifts that have a huge local history and jog many memories that people are almost unanimous in celebrating their replacement.  

 

The old Barrier lift at Stevens Pass was one of these.  Slow, stopping often, long, long, long, and the final part hung you over a ridge that focused the wind on you, so you could freeze into an ice cube by the time you got to the top.  Then you had a frozen rope tow to navigate if you wanted to get up to the next lift (7th Heaven).  They put in a high speed quad, changed its name to "Skyline," moved the top so that the chair runs up the bottom of a bowl under the ridge so the wind is minimal, and you now ski down to the bottom of 7th Heaven from the top of Skyline.  I can't get up much nostalgia for that old chair even though I had some great times on and around it and I'm generally nostalgic about all sorts of stuff.  The new one is vastly better on all counts.

post #18 of 28


There are many Yan chairs still in operation today, it wasn't a safety issue at all. Other than Riblet (and most electrical control upgrades on Riblets were done by Yan, Lift Engineering), Yan makes one the most bullet proof FGD in the industry. The chair most likely will be installed somewhere else.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post

I'm a nostalgic type of person, and like to preserve old things as much as possible, I also dont believe in waste.   But lifts are one place I draw the line, I have no sentiment towards replacing un-safe old, slow lifts for new, better, faster units.   Every resort should do it more often.   I am after all at the mountain to ski, not to risk and waste my life on some old, slow, unsafe, rotting pieces of steel tubing.

 

Now if a place is like MRG, where that old style lift defines it, then do as they did replace with a modern version of the same.



 

post #19 of 28

You're right, K2Skier. That old lift has put in a lot service, and I'll bet it's been more trouble-free than most. There's nothing wrong with it, really, other than being a long and s-l-o-w ride. 

 

"People" (you know who you are!) like modern high-speed detachable lifts. They are much faster. But whatever they may add in quantity, they still never improve the quality of the skiing. Arapahoe Basin has become much more crowded on the lower mountain this season since they replaced the venerable fixed-grip-triple Exhibition lift with a shiny new high-speed quad. 

 

Yan was once one of the most highly-reputed lift manufacturers around, and there were--and still are--a whole lot of them scattered around the U.S. Surely, their reputation took a hit from the tragic Teller Lift crash at Keystone in the early 1980's. That accident involved a particular design that, the investigation concluded, represented an engineering error. While it was a terrible accident (the upper, drive, bullwheel literally broke off from its moorings, causing the cable to snap back against the stanchions and sending a violent shock wave down the cable, throwing a number of people up and out of the chairs and derailing the cable), it spurred a number of positive changes in how lifts are engineered, tested, and built. And the Teller lift, as well as all other lifts (I think there were sixteen, if I recall correctly) that shared its design, were re-engineered and rebuilt before reopening, following that incident. Renamed "Ruby," the Teller lift continued to operate safely for many more seasons at Keystone, before finally being replaced by the detachable six-pack "Ruby Express."

 

Even the oldest of lifts are carefully maintained and tested constantly, according to a rigorous schedule. Accidents happen, but there are probably few other modes of transportation that are safer than chairlifts, statistically speaking. For sure, a lot more skiers get hurt out of them than in them! I'd ride an old Yan (or Riblet, which is getting even rarer) lift with confidence, any time! (Unless there's high-speed lift nearby....)

 

Best regards,

Bob

post #20 of 28

I'd feel a lot better if the chair I was riding said made in Germany or made in Switzerland somewhere on it. Don't like Yan at Squaw at all.

post #21 of 28

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post

And then there are the old, venerable lifts that have a huge local history and jog many memories that people are almost unanimous in celebrating their replacement.  

 

The old Barrier lift at Stevens Pass was one of these.  Slow, stopping often, long, long, long, and the final part hung you over a ridge that focused the wind on you, so you could freeze into an ice cube by the time you got to the top.  Then you had a frozen rope tow to navigate if you wanted to get up to the next lift (7th Heaven).  They put in a high speed quad, changed its name to "Skyline," moved the top so that the chair runs up the bottom of a bowl under the ridge so the wind is minimal, and you now ski down to the bottom of 7th Heaven from the top of Skyline.  I can't get up much nostalgia for that old chair even though I had some great times on and around it and I'm generally nostalgic about all sorts of stuff.  The new one is vastly better on all counts.


I never rode the old lift, but if the wind on the Skyline lift is "minimal" compared to the old lift then I'm really glad I never got to experience it.

 

post #22 of 28

Wasn't it also a Yan lift that had the bad grips at Whistler? I 'll admit to a slight bit of nostalgia for Stowe's old Riblet, the Little Spruce Double, but then the new Poma HSQ that replaced it is soooo nice.

post #23 of 28
Hmmmm Good thread. I learned to ski at Mt. Spokane in the mid 80's, and it had 5 double chairs (Riblet). I skied there again this past Christmas, and it still had 5 Double Chairs (Riblet). I hope it always has 5 Double Chairs (Riblets).
post #24 of 28

Scott's is a slow chair at Alpine in CA and probably serves the best runs there. One thing I noticed now that I'm not in that much of hurry is the time

to watch various skiers come down and look at what they're doing right or wrong. Kinda like a 3 seat kangaroo court. That chair might be slow, but it

doesn't waste any time going sideways at least.

post #25 of 28



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post

Hmmmm Good thread. I learned to ski at Mt. Spokane in the mid 80's, and it had 5 double chairs (Riblet). I skied there again this past Christmas, and it still had 5 Double Chairs (Riblet). I hope it always has 5 Double Chairs (Riblets).


Spokane was also the location of Riblet, and his hometown.  The old tramway up the par 3 on Downriver Golf Course was supposed to be some of his handy work too, because he got tired of walking up the hill (there was an injury on that lift too by the way).

post #26 of 28

My first year as a lift op was running the Hood River Meadows chair at Mt Hood Meadows, a Yan (you're airborne now, OMG did I just say that!). Same chair (carrier) design as High Point, the 14.5 minute ride would put your thighs and feet to sleep, uncomfortable YES, but very dependable and safe. The chair was relocated to Heather Canyon when a LP HSQ was installed
.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I'd feel a lot better if the chair I was riding said made in Germany or made in Switzerland somewhere on it. Don't like Yan at Squaw at all.



 

post #27 of 28


Yes, Yanik Kunczynski  was always trying out new ideas, sometimes before enough R&D was performed. He used "marhmellow" rubber springs instead of coil springs on his forst HSQ's. Over use of the E-brake was what brought the issue to light. Yeah, I don't always care for Wiki, but most of the info is accurate...

 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lift_Engineering 

 

 

All 4 lifts at Mt Hood Skibowl are Riblets, great chairs, and 'merican made!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

Wasn't it also a Yan lift that had the bad grips at Whistler? I 'll admit to a slight bit of nostalgia for Stowe's old Riblet, the Little Spruce Double, but then the new Poma HSQ that replaced it is soooo nice.



 

post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaobrien6 View Post

 


I guess I'm just getting older, but when sitting on a long slow chair with tired legs in the afternoon, I've definitely found myself wishing for a foot rest.  And I'm not ashamed to admit it.

 


me too! @ 2pm, footrest please drool.gif

 

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