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Double pole flip

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Did any skier ever perform a double pole flip ? It might require springs in the poles.

post #2 of 19
Strange question... How are you defining a Double Pole Flip?

As I recall, this particular trick went something like this: Moving rather slowly forward a skier would hold both poles by the very end of the grip. The skier would plant both pole points about a foot ahead of their ski tips. As the skier continued forward they would yank both feet back (using the knees) while also attempting to 'lever-up' onto the tips of the skis. Forward momentum of the skier helped the poles act as vaulting poles (assuming a very firm surface). The skier then pushed-off the ski tips and attempted a forward somersault while also leaning on the pole ends for added support.

This trick didn't require springs in the poles because the poles were used like vaulting poles.(FWIW, I have two sets of poles that have springs under the hand-grips to provide shock-absorber action in bumps - they work great, but no chance they've enough recoil to assist something like this.)

In the 70's and 80's it was a popular trick for athletically inclined people. I was never an athlete of any kind but I still managed to pull it off (rather sloppily) multiple times in a row before a yard sale resulted. It was one of those, "Can you do this?" tricks that every fool like me had to try.

.ma
post #3 of 19


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelA View Post

Strange question... How are you defining a Double Pole Flip?

As I recall, this particular trick went something like this: Moving rather slowly forward a skier would hold both poles by the very end of the grip. The skier would plant both pole points about a foot ahead of their ski tips. As the skier continued forward they would yank both feet back (using the knees) while also attempting to 'lever-up' onto the tips of the skis. Forward momentum of the skier helped the poles act as vaulting poles (assuming a very firm surface). The skier then pushed-off the ski tips and attempted a forward somersault while also leaning on the pole ends for added support.

This trick didn't require springs in the poles because the poles were used like vaulting poles.(FWIW, I have two sets of poles that have springs under the hand-grips to provide shock-absorber action in bumps - they work great, but no chance they've enough recoil to assist something like this.)

In the 70's and 80's it was a popular trick for athletically inclined people. I was never an athlete of any kind but I still managed to pull it off (rather sloppily) multiple times in a row before a yard sale resulted. It was one of those, "Can you do this?" tricks that every fool like me had to try.

.ma

Glad there is another fool here !
 

 

post #4 of 19

Nic if you try a double flip maybe put a little fiberglass reinforcing inside the pole. I have never herd of a double pole flip. Years ago I use to do handsprings with my skis off the ski racks @ the bottom of the hill.  ( A backwards pole flip can also be done by lifting your body in a palms up chin up & flipping over.)

post #5 of 19

Maybe a double is possible. A front or back flip can be done between the poles not just over top of them. A gymnist can do flips on the rings. So if someone had very good balance & flexable shoulders maybe it would be possible. Maybe handles of poles would have to be 90 degrees to the shaft of the pole.

post #6 of 19
By 'Double Pole Flip' I was guessing you meant the type where there is one flip done using both poles, not a 'double flip'.

Here's a video of some of that old stuff. This used to part of the Ballet portion of Freestyle back then.

The fellow starts off with a single pole flip and later does a couple of double-pole flips, the first of which being similar to what I described earlier.

.ma
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 

By double pole flip I mean performing two mid-air flips off a pole launch. The front gut flip method is the only conceivable approach and the second flip would have to be done without ground contact of the poles. I believe Bob Howard performed the first double twisting pole flip ( using the gut flip method ), but launching into a double flip would take the trick to another stratosphere. Unbelievably difficult but not technically impossible. In fact, a former world cup freestyle champion hinted to me that he was about to break one out in competition. The sport however soon ended and consequently TV coverage so if it was ever done, I didn't see it.

post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 

I've seen variations on the pole flip: Split flip, back flip, rock and roll, one poled flip. Don't know who invented each or first performed them in competition. Bob Howard who popularized the gut flip over the tops of his poles credits Mark Whitaker. I've never seen a back full twist pole flip or a double but believe both are possible. Perhaps if Ed Lincoln was still with us.

post #9 of 19

I remember rigging poles, getting the longest ones available, Scott pistol grip strapless.  The bottom part that went around the heel of the hand provided additional support for vaults and spins.  We cut off the top plastic loop and made it smooth and round for palming the tops of the poles.  Some folks would stick one set of poles nonono2.gifin to another eek.giftelescope style to make them longer.  Sounds quite sketchy eh?  I don't know anyone that tried a double pole flip, but I know I tore up my back landing a redface.gif3/4 guts flip on refrozen, rock hard, flat surface.  I hated skiing ballet.  It hurts a lot more when you fall going slow.frown.gif

post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 

What era was that ? When I competed there were companies like Tomic that built poles for that purpose. Speaking of eras, I'm trying to find 70's freestyle competition participant lists and results. PFA, Chevy tour, SnowBust, USSA,etc. Any leads ?

post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicholas Beahan View Post

What era was that ? When I competed there were companies like Tomic that built poles for that purpose. Speaking of eras, I'm trying to find 70's freestyle competition participant lists and results. PFA, Chevy tour, SnowBust, USSA,etc. Any leads ?



After spending all the cash on Astraltunes not much money left for specialized poles.  I don't recall seeing any around, but didn't pay much attention to ballet gear..  Besides, I was pretty short.  56" was more than enough for me, but I do recall friends making double stacks with hacksaws and duct tape.  How much did a pair of ballet specific poles run anyway?   I don't recall ever seeing any but I don't doubt your word that Tomic made some.  Is that something that lots of amateurs out your way had or just pros?

post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicholas Beahan View Post

Did any skier ever perform a double pole flip ? It might require springs in the poles.

 

A double-twisting gut pole flip, yes. One and a half twists off a rock and roll, yes. A double pole flip, no.

post #13 of 19

Found some photos to show why it would be extremely difficult to launch a pole flip on a flat slope--there's just not enough time to flip.

 

post #14 of 19

Wow, some pretty amazing pictures.  I can't even imagine trying that. 

post #15 of 19

Doing a double flip pole flip really isn't likely.  Rudy's were standard on the world cup and even some folks down in the As were hitting them.  Herman and Schabl I believe were both working double twists and don't forget some folks were doing half in half outs.

 

Split pole flips didn't really get you any DoD as they weren't hard, but you really couldn't twist more than a 1/2 on them.

 

Guts were easier when doing half twists rather than straight layouts, but fulls weren't that bad.  Most of us would have to twist the poles to hit a rudy.

 

Rock n Rolls were the toughest to rudy on for me, and that's before Richard started doing things like outside rock n rolls and single pole flips.

 

Back in the day - oh yeah.  Miss ballet big time.  Funny how moguls and air made it and ballet didn't.  Now mogus and air are so stale I can barely watch them.  Every run looks exactly the same.

post #16 of 19

You can do a full twist with a split pole flip.

 

I always thought Christine Rossi's were the nicest.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WljL-pdp5-4

 

Here is one of Conny Kissling's http://youtu.be/DeYbOn5DIcY?t=53s and look at 1:31.

 

Jan Bucher is doing a split pole flip with a full with legs crossed--although it is short:  http://youtu.be/kL0n0LXyAyI?t=5m18s That video ends with Spina doing a one poled full being the showman he always was.

post #17 of 19

You're right.  I forgot some folks were able to twist on the splits.  Now to think of it, I remember folks like Lara Rosenbaum and others doing that.

post #18 of 19

There are some great pole flips/twists about 45 seconds into this video...

 

 

But my favorite is Napoleon Dynamite warming up about 10 seconds in.   ;-)

post #19 of 19

Several more versions of the flip, the first at about 20 seconds in....

 

 

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