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Should I Go For These

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I am seeking an advice about purchasing these:

08'-09' Atomic FIS Race SG Skis w/ Atomic RACE 614 bindings, 210 cm

Brand new skies, and the seller may be willing to put Atomic race 10/18 bindings instead.
Here is a little background:

I have just turned 50. I am in a decent shape (6'2" / 198 -- I know, need to lose about 20 ;) ). I used to race in my pre-teens to mid twenties, when I retired from racing, and later moved away from mountains and suffered several years break from any kind of skiing. Several years after my return to slopes I started doing NASTAR races wherever I got a chance. (A local skier  in Vail asked me a couple of weeks ago "if I was on a mission or something" as I was running NASTAR gates all day long.)

Anyway, I want to join Masters next year, and I will plan my winter vacations around Masters races. I am particularly interested in speed disciplines, and I definitelly whant to do DH and SG as much as my schedule allows. My last DH race was in 1983. Never had a chance to try SG, since the discipline was not around at the time. At that time I was racing on 215 and 220 cm DH skis, and I could handle them easily. My GS were 210 cm then, but I am sure that these Super G are a little heavier than those, more like the old DH.

Should I go after these Atomics? Could they be an overkill for me? The price is less then a half of what would the new model cost, and I am not crazy about having the latest gear just for the sake of it.

Any advise is appreciated.

 

 

post #2 of 12

They're in pain in the a** to turn, but if you're going to run them on SG courses they're a solid ski.  614's are bad binders though.  If you can get him to switch em out for a 1018 I'd totally go for it.  

post #3 of 12

Good ski. Agree with racedude, get the 1018 binding. Many masters racers use that kind of ski for DH and a shorter SG for SG. A lot will depend on your skill level. You'll probably want a SG in a 201 - 204 length (33 m) to compliment the 210. Having the Atomic binding makes it easy to move one set of bindings to multiple pairs of skis (with just the Atomic track) and get more skis for the buck.

 

SkiCooper.com has a number of training camps that are perfect for someone with your background. SwissAm.com (the club where I coach masters speed) always trains at these events. The course gets you going well over 60 mph and the terrain is not intimidating yet quite challenging at the same time. rmmskiracing.org (Rocky Mountain Masters) has DHs and SGs at Cooper, Vail, Keystone, Aspen and WP. We have at least 6 SGs and 6 DHs each season. This past year and the coming year, we'll also be hosting the Masters National DHs at Ski Cooper.

post #4 of 12

Get them with the 10-18 binders.


 

post #5 of 12

Word of advice on speed skis: Older skis (that is, skis that have been used and prepped correctly) are significantly faster than new ones, and are much easier to maintain. I have gone through several pairs of Nordica DH and SG skis (have owned 6 different pairs of DH skis over the past 3 years, and 4 pairs of SG skis), and only two pairs were new in the wrapper. The new ones, even with prep, were no where near as fast as the older skis. For the most part I use the skis that were new as training skis, and the older ones as racers (this is not always true, especially if base damage occurs or a certain pair of skis are already prepped for the conditions/have a more suitable grind).I have put ALOT of work into the skis that were brand new (new grind, fibertexting, several hotbox and run in cycles, etc) to get them up to speed with the older pairs, and it is extremely time consuming.

 

If price is a consideration, I'd look into getting an older used pair that has time on them (ie, 07-08) and has good history (which you don't really know unless you know the seller). I got lucky with that and got several pairs of DH skis from people who have won races here in the East and out West. Make it easy for yourself and get a pair where the work has already been done for you.

 

If I were you, I'd give Muleski a PM and see if he has anything left in his kid's reserve. I've been on their skis before and they are damn fast. I'd also try and contact some of the ski academies and see if they have anything that is going on the auction block (as most academies have their own speed ski stock).

 

-RTT

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thank you very much for taking the time to advise.
Following your responses about the skis and getting better bindings, I bit the bullet and ordered the skis as soon as I learned that the seller would provide 10/18 bindings.

@RTT, your post came just a little late, after I placed my order, but it is highly appreciated. I will definitely have it in mind when buying my next pair. ;) I live, however, so far from mountains and snow, that I don't know anybody in person with any kind of serious racing background, let alone selling quality used skis. This complicates buying used ski stuff from online people, as I have to rely on sweet talk, and ultimately, trust only my gut feeling. I know that it is more or less the same when buying new stuff online, but at least you can check what other people think about the online store before you buy.

My most convenient mountains are around Summit County in CO, and I hope to try some races there next season. I am looking forward to meet some skiers that post here regularly.

 

post #7 of 12

If anyone else is in the market, we have one pair of 2009 Atomic DH in 210cm and a couple pairs of 2008 Super Gs in 205.  $299.

 

We're down to only two pairs of the 1018 bindings.  Please don't order the bindings unless you also order the skis.

post #8 of 12

Don't fret over new vs. old. I've won races on skis with fewer than 10 runs on them. Fast skis are fast, slow skis are slow. A quality tune with a good structure for the conditions and plenty of wax/ski cycles is what makes skis fast. Additionally fast skis can be slow on the wrong snow. The critical importance of fast skis for the conditions at hand is why speed skiers hoard skis; they want skis with a range of performance so that at least one will be right for the snow and course conditions. The older skis will have smaller turn radii as FIS has bumped up the minimums for competition. 4> 33 m SGs and r >40 m DHs are desireable and will work well for most masters events, especially for one getting into the sport. I use a 201 SG (r >33 m), 209 SG (r >33 m) and 215 DH (r > 40 m) as my complete set of speed skis. The SGs work well in most any SG and the 209 SG and DH work well for most any DH.

 

If you are going to get a tune, I recommend a 1 base, 2 side bevel for our snow in CO. If the skis are a 1 base, 3 side bevel, you can use a 2 degree bevel to reduce the 3 degree to 2 degree over time. Sharp edges are important for gripping on ice, but we don't see that much in CO and too sharp an edge will tend to be hooky as well as slow. A problem we do have (if you want to see it that way) is that we race from early January through mid March. Ideally you want a fine structure for the cold winter snow and a more open structure for the warm spring snow. My skis have a fine structure and run fabulously in winter and ok in spring. For the next Nationals DH in March, I'll probably get a new grind after the last winter race then wax and ski the skis a bunch in preparation for the race. I was third by less then 4 tenths to a guy who fanatically worked his skis for the conditions. That isn't going to happen next year.

post #9 of 12

Two Masters rookies from TEXAS next season. beercheer.gif

 

For some reason that seems quite funny to me.

 

Forerunner (Excellent nic), Looking forward to beating, uh, meeting you. 

 

I'm the same age as you and pretty stoked about running Masters.  I have found the racing guys here at Epic, particularly the ones in this thread, to be very helpful and trustworthy. Keep posting, I need to know your weak spots!

 

We could have an Amarillo vs Houst...oh, nevermind.

 

Ski ya later

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post

Don't fret over new vs. old. I've won races on skis with fewer than 10 runs on them. Fast skis are fast, slow skis are slow. A quality tune with a good structure for the conditions and plenty of wax/ski cycles is what makes skis fast. Additionally fast skis can be slow on the wrong snow. The critical importance of fast skis for the conditions at hand is why speed skiers hoard skis; they want skis with a range of performance so that at least one will be right for the snow and course conditions. The older skis will have smaller turn radii as FIS has bumped up the minimums for competition. 4> 33 m SGs and r >40 m DHs are desireable and will work well for most masters events, especially for one getting into the sport. I use a 201 SG (r >33 m), 209 SG (r >33 m) and 215 DH (r > 40 m) as my complete set of speed skis. The SGs work well in most any SG and the 209 SG and DH work well for most any DH.

 

This is exactly what I was trying to get across, but I guess I was just trying to explain how hard it is to get a skis with a GOOD structure and GOOD tune. I've seen alot of kids struggle getting new skis up to speed. It takes a considerable amount of tuning expertise to make a fast pair of skis, which is why I like to get pairs that are already prepped and fast. A couple of years ago when I got a new pair of SG boards I remember slaving in the summer with fibertext pads, structure paper, and a variety of different brushes, as well as dozens upon dozens of hotbox cycles to get a GOOD tune, but even then most of the older boards were faster.

 

Also, go with those bevels (1 base 2 side). No need for a .75/3 or a 1/3 out there with all of that snow you guys got. Even if you get hard snow, I've seen some kids around here kill it on both skis with 1/2 edge angles and .75-1/3 edge angles. Just get used to the skis and make sure to get as much time on them as possible before races, even if you can't sneak into a race camp.

post #11 of 12


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Forerunner View Post

I live, however, so far from mountains and snow, that I don't know anybody in person with any kind of serious racing background, let alone selling quality used skis. This complicates buying used ski stuff from online people, as I have to rely on sweet talk, and ultimately, trust only my gut feeling. I know that it is more or less the same when buying new stuff online, but at least you can check what other people think about the online store before you buy.


 

Just watch for the regular Scotsskier closet clearance sales!  biggrin.gif As plenty of people here will confirm, always good quality gear and good deals.

 

Stuff I need to get around to posting 

 

Speed skis

Salomon SG 201 (2 pairs)

Salomon DH 210

a few GS skis as well once I work out what i am keeping for next year

post #12 of 12

I am 6'4" 250lbs, ski coach, run a tuning business, and for me, a 210 is too big a ski for me, when you take into account the radius at that length. 


 

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