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Are pole straps dangerous? - Page 6

post #151 of 173
I bought some poles the other day (finally got my skis and realized I'd forgotten all about poles!). They release with even a moderate pull upwards from the handle, perfect for when they get caught on something. Now all I have to do is figure out how to calibrate them. Are they calibrated at the factory, or is this something I should check myself?
post #152 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by k2skier View Post

This is why I use Leki, with Trigger Grips. I like having poles for many reasons. In the unlikely event you fall on a pole or get one snagged on something the release great, NEVER had one pre-release.

 

http://leki.com/skiing/polesAlpine.php 

 

http://cgi.ebay.com/Leki-Flex-Lite-Titanium-Trigger-Ski-Poles-130cm-/190520510533?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2c5be84845 

 


 

+ 1 on Leki Trigger grips.  I am on my 3rd pair and love them.  Easy to use.  Comfortable.  Releases whey you need them to.  No more broken thumbs!

 

Rick G
 

 

post #153 of 173

 

 

Quote:
Are they calibrated at the factory, or is this something I should check myself?

Take them to a trusted tuning professional at your favorite specialty ski shop for best results. 

post #154 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by exracer View Post



 

Awesome.... is there going to be an "Auto-Insult" icon added any time soon.  It will make posting far more efficient.  biggrin.gif

 

Sorry... I just couldn't resist.  You pitched that right across the strike zone.



 



Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

desismileys_6158.gif

 

Something like that?

 

 

 

 

 


duck.gif

 

post #155 of 173

I've tried to wade through as much of this thread as I can, but have missed some bits. Has anyone here had any experience with breakaway straps? (Not Leki's, but actual break aways.)

post #156 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

I've tried to wade through as much of this thread as I can, but have missed some bits. Has anyone here had any experience with breakaway straps? (Not Leki's, but actual break aways.)



Like Scott's?   I had a Scott CF poles, straps were designed to rip out in the event they got snagged.  Managed to rip it out once...difficult to get back in.

post #157 of 173

I had them on some Lifelink Avy Poles.  I liked them, but after several seasons they wore out and won't stay in anymore.  I would say I got my moneys worth from those poles as I probably used them for <600 days and still have them.  I never did like the adjustable mechanism on those poles.  I really like the BD Flip Lock system I'm using now.  No breakaway strap on those though.  I've probably got <300 days on the "new" BD poles and they are doing great.

post #158 of 173

Ski poles?  Dangerous?  Perhaps in the hands of some skiers ....

shannon.jpg

post #159 of 173

 

No straps, no danger:

 

chimes_99_edit.jpg

http://www.recycledskis.com/chimes

post #160 of 173

You are way too loose man!

post #161 of 173

my bad - got sucked into the ancient thread polar votex...

 

aaarrrggghhh!

post #162 of 173
I find that a properly used strap (tight with hand up through loop and strap supporting wrist) makes it really difficult to get that pole up and forwards in a pen grip waving about like a magic wand whilst I dither about where to turn. Oh sorry that was the guy with no straps.

I also find it's safer to remove the screws from bindings when skiing trees so my skis can fall off and I can run away if I see a threatening twig on a tree.
I've also stopped wearing the belt on my trouser so they come off easily in a fall to prevent any danger of them causing injury.
Helmet straps are dangerous as a tree could snag the helmet causing the strap to cause separation of the head from the neck, cut that strap off.
In fact to remove all risk cut off all zips, buttons, press studs and straps from clothing so it can all come off in a fall and you will now be much safer. No piece of equipment or clothing should be attached to ones person in any way if you want to be safe.

I now expect the anecdotal evidence that whist skiing a blue run with pole straps on a skier veered off piste was snagged by a tree dislocated their shoulder, fell and dislocated their thumb and was then caught in an avalanche and was unable to swim to the surface and was buried and I f they had not had pole straps they would have survived.

I will accept that in backcountry avalanche terrain it may be wise to remove straps in a vulnerable situation, but all the gapers worrying about avalanche in bounds on blues whist they waft their strapless poles around need rest assured they are safe.

Pole Straps are functional and used properly carry no danger of causing injury and make the correct use of the pole easier and support the wrist and forearm. Thumb injuries occur when falling with an open hand when the thumb impacts into the snow (or Dendix on dry slopes in the UK, it's called Dendix thumb) causing hyper extension and damage to the ligament in the base of the thumb.

If you don't like them/can't use them properly or like being a gaper then fair enough but don't pretend there is a safety advantage to not using them.

Good night.
post #163 of 173

Pole straps have only ever injured me during a fall.  I suppose if I hadn't fallen the strap would not have injured me.  And yes, I was wearing them properly, "The rabbit comes out of the hole and hugs the tree."  

 

I have not ever nearly had my arm ripped off when my pole got caught on a fence, but I have had to go back up and get my "pistol-grip" poles a couple of times when they got snagged on stuff.  I was very glad they separation occurred where it did and not at my shoulder. 

post #164 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by bloxy View Post

I find that a properly used strap (tight with hand up through loop and strap supporting wrist) makes it really difficult to get that pole up and forwards in a pen grip waving about like a magic wand whilst I dither about where to turn. Oh sorry that was the guy with no straps.

I also find it's safer to remove the screws from bindings when skiing trees so my skis can fall off and I can run away if I see a threatening twig on a tree.
I've also stopped wearing the belt on my trouser so they come off easily in a fall to prevent any danger of them causing injury.
Helmet straps are dangerous as a tree could snag the helmet causing the strap to cause separation of the head from the neck, cut that strap off.
In fact to remove all risk cut off all zips, buttons, press studs and straps from clothing so it can all come off in a fall and you will now be much safer. No piece of equipment or clothing should be attached to ones person in any way if you want to be safe.

I now expect the anecdotal evidence that whist skiing a blue run with pole straps on a skier veered off piste was snagged by a tree dislocated their shoulder, fell and dislocated their thumb and was then caught in an avalanche and was unable to swim to the surface and was buried and I f they had not had pole straps they would have survived.

I will accept that in backcountry avalanche terrain it may be wise to remove straps in a vulnerable situation, but all the gapers worrying about avalanche in bounds on blues whist they waft their strapless poles around need rest assured they are safe.

Pole Straps are functional and used properly carry no danger of causing injury and make the correct use of the pole easier and support the wrist and forearm. Thumb injuries occur when falling with an open hand when the thumb impacts into the snow (or Dendix on dry slopes in the UK, it's called Dendix thumb) causing hyper extension and damage to the ligament in the base of the thumb.

If you don't like them/can't use them properly or like being a gaper then fair enough but don't pretend there is a safety advantage to not using them.

Good night.

:ROTFThumbs Up

post #165 of 173

Without straps, this would be an endangered species.

 

The Texas Suitcase:

 

   http://youtu.be/FS70XzV3wGU

post #166 of 173

I keep my pole straps on while boarding the lifts..:devil: 

 

My main poles are almost thirty years old and still not bent, partially due to breakaway straps :o and mostly due to picking the poles up when the chair is coming around the bullwheel.  ;)

post #167 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by exracer View Post
 

 

 

 

No worries.  If you watch this clip from the opening sequence of the classic early 80's ski flick, Hot Dog The Movie, at the 25-26 second mark you can see it done properly and how the strap forms a platform for support between the thumb and forefinger (it's a fun sequence to watch in any case).

 

I also love the fact the skiing is done on a pair of slalom race skis.  Nowadays everybody gets all concerned whether their 90 mm wide all-mountain skis are wide enough to ski six inches of fresh snow.  Back then we'd ski thigh deep snow on 65 mm race skis and not give it a second thought.

 

 

"Unt I had Sunnyside all zeh way around."

post #168 of 173

I know Leki makes a strap that comes off if your pole gets hung up. What I can't figure out is why all straps are not made to break off with enough pressure -- it should be easy: just have the pin that holds them on break under pressure,

 

Does anyone know why this is not the case?

 

I have retrofitted my poles with very old-style handles that are molded and don't need straps.  I'm told they stopped manufacturing them because they were dangerous for thumbs, but I have difficulty picturing the danger.  I also happen to really like the leverage they give me.

 

But I am considering some Leki poles.

post #169 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerSki View Post
 

I know Leki makes a strap that comes off if your pole gets hung up. What I can't figure out is why all straps are not made to break off with enough pressure -- it should be easy: just have the pin that holds them on break under pressure,

 

Does anyone know why this is not the case?

 

If I'd had breakaway straps when I went into a tree well, I'd be dead now.    The fact that the pole was still on my wrist was a) the only way for me to make an air hole b) the other pole was the only thing I had to push against to keep my shoulders from getting pushed down as I made the hole with the other one.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerSki View Post

 

I have retrofitted my poles with very old-style handles that are molded and don't need straps.  I'm told they stopped manufacturing them because they were dangerous for thumbs, but I have difficulty picturing the danger. 


You're lucky.   It took my gf 10 weeks before she could hold a steering wheel with that hand again; 2 years later it's still not back to full strength.

post #170 of 173
True but a high percentage of ski injuries are skiers thumb, so straps could be better. Your case is a bit of an outlier from the majority like the person who didn't wear a seatblet but crashed into a lake so not wearing the seatbelt actually turned out to help them survive better.

Most crashes from a pure safety perspective you'd want the poles thrown out of the way to save your thumbs.

But why they are so simple I think is more just the tradition of implementing the ski code rule "of always use devices to prevent runaway equipment" literally. So your runaway pole doesn't stab someone else and you aren't becoming an obstacle on the piste climbing around for it.

Along these same lines remember when snowboards first came out. Resorts required leashes on them all. Now it seems that rule is relaxed (might be more for convenience)

For the vast majority the basic poles straps are the same concept of following the ski code in the simplest way even if it is minorly injurous some of the time

Of course the enthusiasts can and should get and use something specific (and with that more expensve and complicated) for those xtreme gnar runs he takes
post #171 of 173

I think you need to go back a bit further to understand that ski pole straps were originally designed as an integral part of making the pole useful for locomotion. By having a strap pass under the palm then around the wrist, skiers are able to propel themselves without requiring muscular strength to hold the pole. They simply pushed down with their arms and hands, without having to put a strangle hold grip on the pole and their efforts were transferred to the pole. It is still true today for cross country, poling across flats and race starts.

 

Breakaway designs like Leki's are very effective but somewhat mechanically involved. They have a release button to let you 'wear' the strap rather than continuously put the strap on and off when you need to let go of your poles. I have a pair of Kermas that had a simple clip as part of the adjusting buckle that would separate when strained. It was good enough that when the straps wore out I moved the buckle to replacement straps to retain the breakaway mechanism.

 

Pins that break would be troublesome as you'd need to carry spare pins to replace broken ones.

 

While cantunamunch's life was saved by having poles at hand, I choose not to wear non-break away straps when in the trees for I experience far more opportunities to snag a pole and possibly dislocate a shoulder or some other damage than tree well issues. YMMV.

post #172 of 173

For the past few years I have compromised by putting my straps only around my fingers and then grabbing the pole grip. (Unless I need the poles to push or I'm not in treed or other terrain where I might need to lose the poles quickly.)  If a bush grabs my pole, I can just let the strap run off my hand. So far so good. I tend to drop poles a lot, so not using straps at all is a PITA. 

post #173 of 173

Unless you arms are as long as your ski poles, I don't see how you are going to impale yourself. In fact, it seems like you would be more likely to impale yourself if you ate it and tossed them in front of you. Do this, take both your poles, attach the straps, and try to touch the business end to your chest. Good luck :)

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