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Patroller versus Auxiliary Patroller Poll

Poll Results: The poll question is about who do you want to be the leader in performing medical care on a family member that was severely hurt and is unconscious on the mountain while you were skiing with them. Your choices are a ski patroller with a white cross on their back or a ski patroller without a white cross on their back and a small patch on the front of their jacket that reads Auxiliary Patroller.

Poll expired: May 9, 2011  
  • 33% (1)
    Patroller with White Cross on Back
  • 0% (0)
    Patroller with Auxiliary Patroller patch on front of jacket and no white cross on back of jacket
  • 66% (2)
    Patroller with White Cross on Back and you would tell Auxiliary Patroller to let a real patroller work on your family member
3 Total Votes  
post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

National Ski Patrol is polling their membership about eliminating the Auxiliary Patroller classification.  I thought this warranted a poll for ski and snowboarding public that is NOT a patroller.

 

The poll question is about who do you want to be the leader in  performing medical care on a family member that was severely hurt and is unconscious on the mountain while you were skiing with them. Your choices are a ski patroller with a white cross on their back or a ski patroller without a white cross on their back and a small patch on the front of their jacket that reads Auxiliary Patroller. 

post #2 of 9


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post

National Ski Patrol is polling their membership about eliminating the Auxiliary Patroller classification.  I thought this warranted a poll for ski and snowboarding public that is NOT a patroller.

 

The poll question is about who do you want to be the leader in  performing medical care on a family member that was severely hurt and is unconscious on the mountain while you were skiing with them. Your choices are a ski patroller with a white cross on their back or a ski patroller without a white cross on their back and a small patch on the front of their jacket that reads Auxiliary Patroller. 

Flawed pole.

 

Me.

 

I don't care what he (by he I mean he or she) is wearing, so long as he knows what he's doing.

 

If given a choice between a more qualified and knowledgeable Patroller versus a less able Auxiliary, then the answer is obvious.  However if the choice comes down to having to wait another 5 minutes for the more qualified patroller to arrive on the scene and begin CPR because there aren't enough Auxiliaries on the hill due to the aux. being done away with, that's a different story.

 

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Flawed pole.

 

Me.

 

I don't care what he (by he I mean he or she) is wearing, so long as he knows what he's doing.

 

If given a choice between a more qualified and knowledgeable Patroller versus a less able Auxiliary, then the answer is obvious.  However if the choice comes down to having to wait another 5 minutes for the more qualified patroller to arrive on the scene and begin CPR because there aren't enough Auxiliaries on the hill due to the aux. being done away with, that's a different story.

 


Ghost thanks for replying.  The poll question asked was who do you want to be the LEADER of patient care for your unconscious family member.  In unconscious patient you will see as many as 6 or more patrollers working on your family member.  Would you have a concern about seeing an Auxiliary Patroller being the primary LEADER of patient care? 

 

The question was not about delaying care.  It was about who was going to be the leader in patient care? 

 

Without giving away too much insider information that would change the results of this poll, NSP is not going to reduce the number of patrollers by eliminating the Auxiliary patroller classification. 

 

This poll was meant to be a pop quiz to see the response from the general public that probably has no idea what the differences are between the patroller with the white cross on their back and the patroller without a white cross on their back and a small Auxiliary Patroller patch on the front of their jacket.

 

post #4 of 9

In that case, put my x in the box that says I haven't got a clue what the difference in training and abilities are between the white cross on the back and the patch on the arm.  I just hope they are all well-trained enough to let the most efficacious leader lead.

 

post #5 of 9

Question?  th_dunno-1[1].gif

 

How many areas are still NSP?

 

None of the hills I worked at had ... ok ... there were a few almost token NSP members at that point.

 

What is the presence of the real NSP?

 

I want a crimson jacket with a gold cross myself.  rolleyes.gif

post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post

National Ski Patrol is polling their membership about eliminating the Auxiliary Patroller classification.  I thought this warranted a poll for ski and snowboarding public that is NOT a patroller.

 

The poll question is about who do you want to be the leader in  performing medical care on a family member that was severely hurt and is unconscious on the mountain while you were skiing with them. Your choices are a ski patroller with a white cross on their back or a ski patroller without a white cross on their back and a small patch on the front of their jacket that reads Auxiliary Patroller. 



As a former patroller, I know the difference in the two classifications, and have an opinion, but should I continue . . . ?  Don't want to muck up the survey.

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcolorado View Post





As a former patroller, I know the difference in the two classifications, and have an opinion, but should I continue . . . ?  Don't want to muck up the survey.


Go ahead and answer

 

post #8 of 9


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post




Go ahead and answer

 


At least where I come from, NSP hill patrollers are tested & certified in their abilities to ski and handle a rescue sled anywhere on the mountain in all weather & snow conditions.  Auxiliaries, for any number of reasons, are not trained & certified to run a rescue sled.  Both hill & auxiliary patrollers undergo the same on-mountain first aid training and certification and are equally qualified to administer on-the-mountain medical first response.  

 

I don't think the NSP should have separate uniforms that allow the skiing public to the distinguish between hill (full) and auxiliary patrollers.  Both types of patrollers are equally important in making the mountain a safer place.  It's unfortunate, but the skiing public in its lack of understanding may see an 'auxiliary badge' as a sign of lesser qualification, and that is a perception that would be unfounded and untrue.  Auxiliaries are actually likely to treat more people and keep there skills sharpened, since they see all accident cases that come through the patrol room from everywhere on the mountain.  


Typically the first patroller, whether hill or auxiliary, on the scene is the team leader until he/she relinquishes that position.  That sometimes happens depending on experience levels of those in attendance.
 
If a family member of mine needed advanced medical treatment for a life-threatening injury, I would want the smartest, most experienced patroller as team leader at the accident scene to oversee on-hill patient stabilization with the fastest/safest transport off the mountain to a more advanced medical support facility.  With the strongest, most experienced hill patroller in the handlebars.
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

Quote:

Originally Posted by mcolorado View Post


 


At least where I come from, NSP hill patrollers are tested & certified in their abilities to ski and handle a rescue sled anywhere on the mountain in all weather & snow conditions.  Auxiliaries, for any number of reasons, are not trained & certified to run a rescue sled.  Both hill & auxiliary patrollers undergo the same on-mountain first aid training and certification and are equally qualified to administer on-the-mountain medical first response.  

 

I don't think the NSP should have separate uniforms that allow the skiing public to the distinguish between hill (full) and auxiliary patrollers.  Both types of patrollers are equally important in making the mountain a safer place.  It's unfortunate, but the skiing public in its lack of understanding may see an 'auxiliary badge' as a sign of lesser qualification, and that is a perception that would be unfounded and untrue.  Auxiliaries are actually likely to treat more people and keep there skills sharpened, since they see all accident cases that come through the patrol room from everywhere on the mountain.  


Typically the first patroller, whether hill or auxiliary, on the scene is the team leader until he/she relinquishes that position.  That sometimes happens depending on experience levels of those in attendance.
 
If a family member of mine needed advanced medical treatment for a life-threatening injury, I would want the smartest, most experienced patroller as team leader at the accident scene to oversee on-hill patient stabilization with the fastest/safest transport off the mountain to a more advanced medical support facility.  With the strongest, most experienced hill patroller in the handlebars.

 

Well said.  I guess we can forget the poll now, which is ok because I think my poll questions and answers were in fact flawed and not well thought out. 

 

The auxiliary patroller classification is an ancient left over when patrollers had minimal first aid training.  Today's patrollers and Auxiliary patrollers are trained and certifed in Outdoor Emergency Care.  Its possible that an Auxiliary Patroller is an OEC Instructor.  Its also possible that an Auxilieary Patroller is an Instructor for OEC Instructors called an OEC Instructor Trainer.  Even though an Auxiliary patroller is not allowed to have a cross on their back by NSP P&P and it says Auxiliary Patroller on the front of their jacket, its very possible they have more medical experience than other patrollers with a cross.  This left over NSP Policy and Procedure where different patrollers where different uniforms would probably lead to a lot of customer confusion.

 

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