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Off piste - Ma

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

some video from today for MA. first 2 clips are bumps with about 5 inches of new on them, the last 3 are woods with about 12 inches of new on them. I slowed down the clips to 75 percent for the second run though of the clips because I can make VERY quick movement in realtime that are really hard to see at full speed.

 

 

 

Goals - to shred, to look like I DONT have a stick up my ass while skiing, to keep myself entertained, and overall be as dynamic, but while be smooth and efficient.

 

video will be up at rough midnight eastern time...

 

 

post #2 of 25

Looks like good snow Bushwacker, no other people on that run? Nice!

 

Here's what I see.  Fast/aggressive skiing, but you are using your strength and muscling your turns because you aren't getting enough shovel pressure.  You're back on your tails a lot and you're pulling the tips around instead of riding them.  This can be seen especially as you pull your left hand across your body in a left turn, your right hand is often back/down at your hip and your upper body/shoulders are twisting a lot because of this as you finish your turn.

 

You need to get forward, calm your arm/hand movements down, and focus on keeping your chest square to the fall line.  All of these suggestions revolve around your pole plant which is your weak link IMO.  The good news is this is a relatively quick and easy fix that will produce almost instant results/feedback as it will naturally align other pieces of the puzzle.  It doesn't make any sense to work/focus on anything else until you dial in your pole plant.  Your are carrying a lot of speed and this demands a crisp/clean pole plant.

 

CVJ and I have repeatedly commented on the importance of the pole plant, this is key and cannot be overlooked.  You want to focus on keeping both elbows out from the chest and forward of your chest.  This will get your hands reaching down the hill and allow you to make your pole plant near your tips as opposed to your bindings.  This will naturally square your chest and get you off your tails as your will be able to generate more forward/shovel pressure earlier in your turn.

 

I'm not trying to be condescending and hope Lars doesn't think I'm being to harsh.  I think improving your pole plant will take you furthest and the quickest.

post #3 of 25

Nice skiing. Im not going to give any MA but rather drop a comment on the filming. I have never experimented with helmet cameras but it looks like a killer consept especially offpist. Everyone wears a helmet camera and then you film each other. Let the camera roll. I bet you get lots of nice sequences adhoc that you did not plan and with a conventional camera setup never would have gotten on vide. No zooming needed. No waiting for the camera man to set things up. Just ski. Good work. I particulary liked the sequence where you jumped past the cameraman.

 

 

post #4 of 25

How do you ride the tips on Rockers Nail?

post #5 of 25
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nailbender View Post

Looks like good snow Bushwacker, no other people on that run? Nice!

 

Here's what I see.  Fast/aggressive skiing, but you are using your strength and muscling your turns because you aren't getting enough shovel pressure.  You're back on your tails a lot and you're pulling the tips around instead of riding them.  This can be seen especially as you pull your left hand across your body in a left turn, your right hand is often back/down at your hip and your upper body/shoulders are twisting a lot because of this as you finish your turn.

 

You need to get forward, calm your arm/hand movements down, and focus on keeping your chest square to the fall line.  All of these suggestions revolve around your pole plant which is your weak link IMO.  The good news is this is a relatively quick and easy fix that will produce almost instant results/feedback as it will naturally align other pieces of the puzzle.  It doesn't make any sense to work/focus on anything else until you dial in your pole plant.  Your are carrying a lot of speed and this demands a crisp/clean pole plant.

 

CVJ and I have repeatedly commented on the importance of the pole plant, this is key and cannot be overlooked.  You want to focus on keeping both elbows out from the chest and forward of your chest.  This will get your hands reaching down the hill and allow you to make your pole plant near your tips as opposed to your bindings.  This will naturally square your chest and get you off your tails as your will be able to generate more forward/shovel pressure earlier in your turn.

 

I'm not trying to be condescending and hope Lars doesn't think I'm being to harsh.  I think improving your pole plant will take you furthest and the quickest.


 

you have a pretty good eye. I would totally agree with you that I am aft. I think I can take from this I need a stronger inside half IE I dont let my hands drop back and its is something I have been working on. I am honestly not sure I want more tip pressure on this particular day but it could be useful in more hard pack snow.

 

Jamt is right tthose are far from bump skis but I have learned to make them work on softish conditions.

 

post #6 of 25

Nice skiing.  The only thing I might change is a little more tip pressure in the bump run; there is one point in the bump run where it looks obvious that you are too far back, and not pressuring the tips enough.  I say "might change" and "looks", because I don't know how much snow resistance there is and because your rockers might respond a little too much.  You could also replace a couple of up transitions with flexing cross-under transitions to be more aggressive/faster, not that you really care what I think, as I'm no expert, plus I suck at bumps.


 

post #7 of 25

Reminds me of the day we skied Holimont BW.

 

Looks like fun and that's the idea right?

 

Honestly, looks like you're trying to muscle turns in snow not suited for the size of your skis. I don't think it's so much you as maybe you would have been so much smoother on narrower, quicker turning skis. Like maybe an 84 waist. Which would have had you skiing them a little more forward and aggresively.

 

Bottom line, it just looks like you're working way to hard to achieve the thrill/fun factor. But still better skiing than %90 of the world.

post #8 of 25

Like the music:-) Agree w/ Nail about backseat and more ski engagement in the turns, it will put fun in and take the work out. IMO use more upper/lower body separation.ie- round the turns+bend the skis=dynamic smooth skiing. April just keeps giving thank-you.

post #9 of 25

I liked the "air" over the lip in the woods. Just illustrates how comfortable and relaxed of a tree skier that you are. I'm goig to guess under the new snow the surface was pretty crusty? I'm out here in Colorado skiing and we had a nice powder day Monday. However beneath the powder there was a lot of crust from the earlier milder weather.

 

Anyway, for me the crust below throws a pretty tough variable to handle. I know this for sure, for a guy that grew up in Pittsburgh you ski awful well and are only getting better. Nice job.

post #10 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by roundturns View Post

I liked the "air" over the lip in the woods. Just illustrates how comfortable and relaxed of a tree skier that you are. I'm goig to guess under the new snow the surface was pretty crusty? I'm out here in Colorado skiing and we had a nice powder day Monday. However beneath the powder there was a lot of crust from the earlier milder weather.

 

Anyway, for me the crust below throws a pretty tough variable to handle. I know this for sure, for a guy that grew up in Pittsburgh you ski awful well and are only getting better. Nice job.



there was a crust in the bump runs, but in the woods it was basically bottomless snow. Only about 10 inches of snow but the density was just enough that we werent hitting anything. There will be a 'stoke video" from the same soon.

 

I tried being more forward today while skiing, but I just end up getting pushed back alot. So I went back to using foot squirt aka catch and release skiing and in general I felt as if I was skiing with less effort. i also dont know how could have MORE upper and lower body seperation than what I have. Bob Barnes I would be more curious in your thoughts than most people on here. Your Legend and make more sense than most of the other really high end coaches on here.

 

207259_1977096271125_1354674216_32353895_7242699_n.jpg

post #11 of 25

Josh that was some of your suckiest skiing, you should go over to Spruce and work a on your park and ride tech.roflmao.gifHope I got the right smiley thing down. Nice air in the woods looks even better at 75% speed. I agree with Nailbender on what he is telling you, my thing I see is the right arm especially when you pole touch you seem to have a gate blocking movement that rolls out away from your body then the arm/ shoulder gets a bit behind you. In an ideal world everything moves down hill or in the direction you are traveling and when you drop that hand it is going in a different direction than the rest of your body. Kind of gets your shoulders working to much. I can see where this technique is useful for moving branches away in the woods though. Great skiing you got going on there, must be tough picking out which fresh line to ski each lap.smile.gif

post #12 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowbowler View Post

Josh that was some of your suckiest skiing, you should go over to Spruce and work a on your park and ride tech.roflmao.gifHope I got the right smiley thing down. Nice air in the woods looks even better at 75% speed. I agree with Nailbender on what he is telling you, my thing I see is the right arm especially when you pole touch you seem to have a gate blocking movement that rolls out away from your body then the arm/ shoulder gets a bit behind you. In an ideal world everything moves down hill or in the direction you are traveling and when you drop that hand it is going in a different direction than the rest of your body. Kind of gets your shoulders working to much. I can see where this technique is useful for moving branches away in the woods though. Great skiing you got going on there, must be tough picking out which fresh line to ski each lap.smile.gif


it may be a relic from Pa, Sl racing days. Whats funny is the 2 days I actually got to run SL this year, it was like I never stopped running it. BTW for how much I love this stuff I could ski SL gates for hours...well if there wasnt new snow.

 

post #13 of 25

Josh I'm wondering if you were aft to avoid sub-surface obstacles. The pelvis in particular stays aft a lot during the video but considering the snow pack might have been a little on thin side and the new snow might have been on the the heavier side, it might not have been an error as much as a smart tactical choice. Yes you muscled the turns but aft rotor turns got you through the terrain without the higher risk of going forward over the tips if you hit something beneath the snow.

 

It would seem the still photo shows the right shoulder is behind the hip and that right pole is lingering on a stabalizing (blocking) pole plant. Is that to help stabalize the torso during that foot squirting "catch and release" transition? It looks a lot like a "jet turn" from the seventies. (not to be confused with the French racing version of the late sixties).

post #14 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post

Josh I'm wondering if you were aft to avoid sub-surface obstacles. The pelvis in particular stays aft a lot during the video but considering the snow pack might have been a little on thin side and the new snow might have been on the the heavier side, it might not have been an error as much as a smart tactical choice. Yes you muscled the turns but aft rotor turns got you through the terrain without the higher risk of going forward over the tips if you hit something beneath the snow.

 

It would seem the still photo shows the right shoulder is behind the hip and that right pole is lingering on a stabalizing (blocking) pole plant. Is that to help stabalize the torso during that foot squirting "catch and release" transition? It looks a lot like a "jet turn" from the seventies. (not to be confused with the French racing version of the late sixties).


On the snow surface the only thing I was avoiding was the hard crust underneath. There really is nothing to hit out in the woods right now, we have the deepest base of the year right now.

 

the picture was taken in some of the worst variable conditions I have seen inbounds in a quite a while. Your most likely right on that particular turn. I was more using the picture to show the foot squirt and also to say "I think i have alot of upper and lower body separation" I could probably have more and I think in my right turns I can lead with my inside hip more.

 

post #15 of 25

Nice video quality and music, and definitely looked like FUN skiing! Had a thought that you might just try using one of the softer tongues in those Dalbellos?

post #16 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post

Nice video quality and music, and definitely looked like FUN skiing! Had a thought that you might just try using one of the softer tongues in those Dalbellos?



I would actually like them stiffer sometime I can feel as if I push to hard Ill end up over the handlebars, I do use the softer tongues when ever it is REALLY cold out.

post #17 of 25

Edit, because two wrongs don't make a right. 


Edited by Crud Buster - 4/7/11 at 8:26pm
post #18 of 25


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




On the snow surface the only thing I was avoiding was the hard crust underneath. There really is nothing to hit out in the woods right now, we have the deepest base of the year right now.

 

the picture was taken in some of the worst variable conditions I have seen inbounds in a quite a while. Your most likely right on that particular turn. I was more using the picture to show the foot squirt and also to say "I think i have alot of upper and lower body separation" I could probably have more and I think in my right turns I can lead with my inside hip more.

 


Why do you think you have a lot of separation?  Your feet look under your body in the pic and your coat zipper is inbetween your legs.  Your head is separated, but nothing else.

post #19 of 25

Look at your shoulders and then look at your hips.They should be pointed in the same direction.

 

Quote:

i also dont know how could have MORE upper and lower body seperation than what I haveIs

post #20 of 25

Nice video and improving skiing from some of your last videos. +1 on the blocking poleplant. It was the first thing to jump out at me.

I'd say the tip pressure comment is right on too. Specifically where? At the top of the turn. Most of your turns appear to be missing their top half. I think if you moved to the tip at transition you could engage the ski high in the arc and improve. move more with the ski than down the fall line. Any of that resonate with you?

post #21 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdxammo View Post

Nice video and improving skiing from some of your last videos. +1 on the blocking poleplant. It was the first thing to jump out at me.

I'd say the tip pressure comment is right on too. Specifically where? At the top of the turn. Most of your turns appear to be missing their top half. I think if you moved to the tip at transition you could engage the ski high in the arc and improve. move more with the ski than down the fall line. Any of that resonate with you?


it does...

 

but I tried yesterday to keep stuffing my tips and the balance/feedback I was getting was less than desirable. its actually ruined a good day of bump skiing. I kept getting thrown way back instead of when I strive to stay as centered as possible I tend to be really balanced. Remember as well the skis I were on werent exactly bump skis they were volkl Katana, not sure how much tip driivng on that ski you can really do in bumps...or anywhere it seems to favor lateral movements. Not making excuses just saying that a fully rockered ski. I actually question how many people commenting on this video have spent any time on ski like that, to know what it can and cant do. I know you have though.

 

 

Also its hard to see tracks on run like this but on groomers even my short radius turns look like rail roads tracks. Meaning according to those tracks there is a top half of the turn.

 

post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




it may be a relic from Pa, Sl racing days. Whats funny is the 2 days I actually got to run SL this year, it was like I never stopped running it. BTW for how much I love this stuff I could ski SL gates for hours...well if there wasnt new snow.

 

Well they are just bendable trees. Have fun in Utah this year.
 

 

post #23 of 25

The Katana is my powder ski. I aggressively drive it into the snow immediately after transition while tipping and it responds very well. I also focus on trying to extend into the direction of my new turn, not so much down the fall line, and stand on my new outside ski before I start the turn. My Volkl bridge likes this too. I have sultan 94's and they seem to like the centered stance more. Now my volkls are the older non-rockered versions so that may factor in.

post #24 of 25

   To expand on the Katana a bit. I think the whole point of that ski is the stiff tip. I believe the design is intended to allow you to leverage the tip of the ski and blast through crud and keep the tip well engaged through the turn. I think it is a ski that is meant to be driven not surfed.

  I think there is another option other than "stuffing the tips" maybe others can be more eloquent than myself but, this seems worth exploring.

post #25 of 25


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

 

 

Also its hard to see tracks on run like this but on groomers even my short radius turns look like rail roads tracks. Meaning according to those tracks there is a top half of the turn.

 




Every turn has a top half.  Just because you have tipped the ski on edge in the top half doesn't mean everything else is set up to do anything with that edge.  You can tip early in the high C and still tip over on your side by the bottom of the turn.  The goal is to actually get performance from the tipped ski in the high C.  At transition you can either let your feet move away from your body to create bigger angles, or you can move your body in an position to create the angles you need.  Think about which do you do and why? Edit: try to relate this to short turns, as that's what you were doing in the vid. 


Edited by Crud Buster - 4/9/11 at 12:52am
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