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Powder skis, do they really work?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I am sorry to ask this question, but after skiing powder today, I am wondering if one of the reasons I am having a harder time with it is because of my skis.  I currently have 177cm, Head Intelligence c105s (2003).  They are 66mm under foot, which makes it thin for a carving ski now a days.  Would I have a significantly easier time with powder skis?

post #2 of 16

My Answer:

 

Skier on skinny skis: nonono2.gif

Skier on powder boards: yahoo.gif

 

Enough said.

post #3 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wraith View Post

I am sorry to ask this question, but after skiing powder today, I am wondering if one of the reasons I am having a harder time with it is because of my skis.  I currently have 177cm, Head Intelligence c105s (2003).  They are 66mm under foot, which makes it thin for a carving ski now a days.  Would I have a significantly easier time with powder skis?



why do you even have to ask? sorry but you know the answer if they didnt work noone would use them.

post #4 of 16



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wraith View Post

I currently have 177cm, Head Intelligence c105s (2003).  They are 66mm under foot, which makes it thin for a carving ski now a days.  Would I have a significantly easier time with powder skis?


You spent all day trying to balance between your two skis, while simultaneously adjusting fore/aft balance.  With wide skis almost all of that goes away.  If the skis are wide enough, one of them will support your weight in the powder, so you can almost ski it like hardpack, step on the left, and then step on the right. If you get a ski with a little tip rocker you do not have to worry about your tips diving.  The amount of mental and physical work needed is so much less that you will be skiing longer and enjoying it more.  Many powder specific skis are now more than twice as wide as your 66s.
 

 

post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 

@ Bushwacker,

 

They are selling, so they work to some degree, obviously, I am more wondering how much it easier it makes it.  Basically, should I demo a a pair next time I have a powder day (likely next year) for 40-50 dollars, or just tough it out.

post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 

@ Mudfoot,

 

Thanks.  I guess it makes it significantly easier, (especially in the heavy stuff), which may partially explain why I has having such a rough time in it.  I guess I will demo a pair the next powder day.

post #7 of 16


You need to watch this!biggrin.gif

http://www.xtranormal.com/watch/5987841/truth-about-powder-skis

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wraith View Post

I am sorry to ask this question, but after skiing powder today, I am wondering if one of the reasons I am having a harder time with it is because of my skis.  I currently have 177cm, Head Intelligence c105s (2003).  They are 66mm under foot, which makes it thin for a carving ski now a days.  Would I have a significantly easier time with powder skis?



 

post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post


You need to watch this!biggrin.gif

http://www.xtranormal.com/watch/5987841/truth-about-powder-skis

 


I saw this before and it is so funny.  Thanks for posting it.

 

post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wraith View Post

@ Bushwacker,

 

They are selling, so they work to some degree, obviously, I am more wondering how much it easier it makes it.  Basically, should I demo a a pair next time I have a powder day (likely next year) for 40-50 dollars, or just tough it out.


A lot. Go over 100 and get some decent rocker on a good day. I think you will be surprised.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wraith View Post

@ Bushwacker,

 

They are selling, so they work to some degree, obviously, I am more wondering how much it easier it makes it.  Basically, should I demo a a pair next time I have a powder day (likely next year) for 40-50 dollars, or just tough it out.


I would just buy anything really. It will be better than your 66mm skis

 

in fact I havent freeskied a ski under 84mm this year I see no point anymore with how good a low fat can ski hardpack.

 

post #11 of 16

Definitely demo powder boards, you will not be disappointed...

And once you figure out how to ski the pow, it will ruin your life - it's the crack cocaine of snow!

post #12 of 16



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post


You need to watch this!biggrin.gif

http://www.xtranormal.com/watch/5987841/truth-about-powder-skis

 



 



Holy crap, that's funny!

 

post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by lynchmobracing View Post
 
And once you figure out how to ski the pow, it will ruin your life - it's the crack cocaine of snow!


So true! I finally got half way decent in pow my last trip out a few weeks ago, and now am going back for four more days. Chasing that "powder high"!

 

post #14 of 16

Can give a partial answer to your question.  I'm only just beginning to get a taste of wider skis myself.  Been skiing since the '60s, but almost entirely in the East and never skied anything wider than about 74mm underfoot.  Currently ski 67mm underfoot most of the time, but was gifted an older pair of skis that are 94mm underfoot this season.  Took them for a week in Utah, Jan '11.  After the first 90 minutes the 67mm skis stayed in the trunk of the car the rest of the trip.  The fatter skis worked fine on packed powder and much better in loose or untracked snow.  I have a lot of fond memories of doing just fine in powder on old narrow straight skis back in the '70s-'90s.  but I think the narrow-waisted, highly shaped carver skis actually ski worse in powder (~10"+) than old skinny skis.  They seem floppy and grabby, rather than just quietly gliding under the snow like the old days.  Furthermore, an area were fat skis can make a very big difference is in untracked snow that is stale or heavy.  They can turn that into pretty fun skiing by keeping you near the surface for easier turning, when such conditions would be a lot of heavy lifting on any other ski or avoided entirely.

When I returned home to the hardpack of the mid-Atlantic the 67mm skis came back out and the 94mm skis were used sparingly because they did not perform as well in firm/icy conditions.  From the posts on this website by good Eastern skiers I get the impression state-of-the-art mid-fat skis (85-100mm) can perform well on all surfaces now.

post #15 of 16

You have cross-country skis!


 

post #16 of 16

maybe lack of sidecut is actually a good feature for use in powder skis versus the side cut in carving skis(which assist in carving and making turns but can pull the ski side to side in powder? 

 

just a thought.....I have a pair of Salomon Scream LTD skis that seem to have very little sidecut for an 80 mm waist ski.   i think they were designed to be touring/telemark skis.  i use regular bindings with them and they work well enough for me in powder, crud and loose snow.  then again, maybe I am just used to them and compensating.

 

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