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Spring Skiing Tips Wanted - Page 2

post #31 of 45

post #32 of 45

I always figured spring skiing was for people with passes who didn't mind skiing for a couple of hours and hitting the bar. Check overnight low temp--if it didn't freeze last night stay home. And like the man said--ski steep and stay off the flats as much as you can.

 

I would disagree with Mr Elling on one point--at least around here--California--south facing thaws before east facing.


Edited by oldgoat - 4/1/13 at 2:27pm
post #33 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

I always figured spring skiing was for people with passes who didn't mind skiing for a couple of hours and hitting the bar. Check overnight low temp--if it didn't freeze last night stay home. And like the man said--ski steep and stay off the flats as much as you can.

 

I would disagree with Mr Elling on one point--at least around here--California--south facing thaws before east facing.


I always figured that people who want to ski hard snow in spring don't quite get it.

post #34 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post


I always figured that people who want to ski hard snow in spring don't quite get it.

It needs to freeze at night so it isn't slop the next day.  Of course, you wait for the frozen to thaw which on south facing is usually by the time the lifts open, depending on the month. As far as I'm concerned once it stops freezing at night the season is done. This is more of an issue in Cal than in the northern rockies. The latest I've skied inbounds at Tahoe was Memorial Day and the snow was pretty good up  high, but the suncups were murder. 

post #35 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post

 

....the kind of snow that grabs your skis at speed and you feel like you're gonna come out of your boots. The kind of snow that requires poling down shallow inclines. Mrs5150 hates that kinda snow. I don't mind it, but she would like to get info on what can be done to make it better for her.

 

Tips?

 

Carve. Ski on the edges.  When it gets wet the flat ski bottom becomes a suction cup. No wax works. Only thing that would work would be cutting grooves you base to break the surface tension suction...we are not going there.

 

Carving, skiing on the edges works but it is tedious, one lapse and the grabby wets will get you.

post #36 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eagles Pdx View Post

 

Carve. Ski on the edges.  When it gets wet the flat ski bottom becomes a suction cup. No wax works. Only thing that would work would be cutting grooves you base to break the surface tension suction...we are not going there.

 

Carving, skiing on the edges works but it is tedious, one lapse and the grabby wets will get you.

 

 

Wrong... a well prepared and waxed base will do. No need to scrape it thin. If it's really ridiculous glop snow, you can alway use rain-X. It lasts a run.  

post #37 of 45

IME, the trick is to follow the sun, keep search out what snow is melted enough but not too much. By the time everything is glop, I'd: 1) Go get lunch with a beer or three and watch everyone else get bogged down, or 2) Go click into your 115 mm fully rockered glop skis, or 3) Just ski the stuff like you'd ski regular soft snow, with a bit more up and down, forget carving, this is about pivoting and smearing, keep your stance narrow and your weight even, initiate early so you don't have to suddenly change the ski's trajectory in mid arc, ski fast for float, and stop moaning. It's white and it allows us to slide. Be thankful it's not July. 

post #38 of 45

Craving in slop is faster than any other method. I hit 47mph yesterday on bare bases. The wider skis are benefical. PS-We ski in July here.smile.gif

post #39 of 45

I crave slop!smile.gif

post #40 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

I always figured spring skiing was for people with passes who didn't mind skiing for a couple of hours and hitting the bar.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

I always figured that people who want to ski hard snow in spring don't quite get it.

 

Passes? Sure, as it's hard to get a full day in even if you're so inclined, and who wants to pay $100 for a couple/few hours skiing? But if you can hang onto the same feeling you have in October then it's not hard to embrace the harder stuff in the morning (groomer zoom if you don't want to deal with the coral off piste) and the softer stuff later in the day (until it becomes so manky that it's risky to continue). I think minimum 4-5 hour days are reasonable to shoot for most places if you follow the sun as has been advised.

 

I've tried to embrace the tenets of Mr. Barne's Crudology, and they seem to help in most conditions. The one exception I've found is that when I run into a few inches of really soft, (but not yet grabby), velvety cream cheese spread stuff, it just seems natural whatever skis I'm on to make a single platform, lean back slightly and schmear my way down on mostly flat skis. (I think basically what Beyond is suggesting in post #37.) It's a cool feeling and fun, and effortless if I let go and just flow with it. Never have water skied, but must be a similar thing. Staying on edge in that stuff does not feel right to me.

 

One thing's for sure: This time of year you can run into just about everything on a single run, and I for one feel pretty worked by the end of a day, however long it might last.

 

Please, may it last a little longer!  wink.gif

post #41 of 45

I love skiing on 75mm skis all mountain and all conditions at Whistler. I also love spring skiing. When the snow really softens though, eventually I get a bit more bogged down and occasionally feel more pull than I'm comfortable with on my skis (IE get worried about tearing a ligament due to pilot error).

 

Would a fatter ski help? How fat would you go to smooth out the ride, while maintaining a maximal carving sensation? 

post #42 of 45

Am I wrong, or does skiing down a bump field make the velcro-snow a little easier to manage?

Yesterday was about 70 at the hill, and it hasn't been freezing at night, so things are thick and sticky...cloudy and 60ish today.  The lift corral was large pools of water a few inches deep.  

Anyway, I do the high edge angle with skis close together thing until I wear myself out, then I'll head in.

 

Today was especially bad, and after 3 runs, I was riding up the lift thinking I was begging for a mangled knee, so I'd better head in.  Chewed up snow seems to be better than smooth, and I dropped onto a run that had become seriously bumped up over the last few days.  I hadn't expected that, but It wasn't too bad.  I would just drop onto the ridge of the bump, pivot into a short-radius turn down and around its front side to the next bump ridge down.  My skis either had little surface contact with the snow (pivoting on top of the bumps) or were on high edge angles dropping down and around them.

 

I don't claim to be an expert on the matter, but it was the easiest skiing of the day.  In fact, I even chanced it again and then headed in.  (Why tempt fate...my right knee is in a brace as is)

Of course, if there aren't any decent-sized bump runs aroundabouts, it wouldn't be much of a solution.  Might be worth seeking out, though. 

post #43 of 45
Quote:
Would a fatter ski help? How fat would you go to smooth out the ride, while maintaining a maximal carving sensation?

 

There's a thread going on about that right now: www.epicski.com/t/119722/suggestions-for-skis-best-in-spring-slush-conditions

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skierish View Post

Am I wrong, or does skiing down a bump field make the velcro-snow a little easier to manage?

 

...My skis either had little surface contact with the snow (pivoting on top of the bumps) or were on high edge angles dropping down and around them.

 

I think it's a combination of those factors and that the water drainage is (usually) better in moguls than on a flat surface of the same inclination.  It's gonna be WAY easier to pivot on top of a mogul than embedded in slush/crud on a flat slope.

post #44 of 45

I just go ride my bikecool.gif

post #45 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skierish View Post

Am I wrong, or does skiing down a bump field make the velcro-snow a little easier to manage?

Spring bumps are the best!  The troughs/ruts always retain the fastest snow in the afternoon.

 

JF

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