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local PNW mtn got spanked 1.5-2ft of heavy snow...my new 100mm boards not ideal...or is it me?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

our local mtn cypress here in vancouver got dumped on yesterday: 42 in early morning and by 2pm (still snowing) this amt had reached 55 cm...and by night fall it would be 61 cm..whew!)

 

...problem is, however, the snow was heavy, given the temp all day stayed at 0C (32F)...so it never got a chance to become lighter or drier....wonder if this would have made a difference with floatation (had temps been -3to -6, say?)...or regardless given the depth of the snow would I have needed more than my 100mm atomic access?

 

when one of the runs did open at 2pm (51 cm had fallen by then) it was pretty amazing coming down but due to the heaviness of the snow you could easily sink right into it and get buried...while I thought my 100mm atomic access would be fine in such, they weren't....instead it was those using the much wider skis having most successful float ie k2 pontoons or anything with a 130mm waist or more ..but heck it was the  boarders having most flotation given the girth of their tools, in reality.

 

regardless tons of people were sinking or would do so when wiping out, esp on less than steep terrain (which i reasoned was needed to keep moving and stay 'above' this heavier snow)

so i tried to keep moving down the fall line as well as keep my skis together (for more girth to mimic boarders) and that fared better to some extent.

 

so aside from my mediocre skill level with this stuff, anyone else have some tips/insight as i'm heading out again today. (temp is -1c and no doubt will warm up as day progresses, however...so not slush, but...)

 

 


Edited by canali - 4/5/11 at 7:38am
post #2 of 18


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by canali View Post

our local mtn cypress here in vancouver got dumped on yesterday: 42 in early morning and by 2pm (still snowing) this amt had reached 55 cm...and by night fall it would be 61 cm..whew!)

 

...problem is, however, the snow was heavy, given the temp all day stayed at 0C (32F)...so it never got a chance to become lighter or drier....wonder if this would have made a difference with floatation (had temps been -3to -6, say?)...or regardless given the depth of the snow would I have needed more than my 100mm atomic access?

 

when one of the runs did open at 2pm (51 cm had fallen by then) it was pretty amazing coming down but due to the heaviness of the snow you could easily sink right into it and get buried...while I thought my 100mm atomic access would be fine in such, they weren't....instead it was those using the much wider skis having most successful float ie k2 pontoons or anything with a 130mm waist or more ..but heck it was the  boarders having most flotation given the girth of their tools, in reality.

 

regardless tons of people were sinking or would do so when wiping out, esp on less than steep terrain (which i reasoned was needed to keep moving and stay 'above' this heavier snow)

so i tried to keep moving down the fall line as well as keep my skis together (for more girth to mimic boarders) and that fared better to some extent.

 

so aside from my mediocre skill level with this stuff, anyone else have some tips/insight as i'm heading out again today. (temp is -1c and no doubt will warm up as day progresses, however...so not slush, but...)

 

 



how long are your skis?

post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 

171

and i stand 166

post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by canali View Post


so aside from my mediocre skill level with this stuff, anyone else have some tips/insight as i'm heading out again today. (temp is -1c and no doubt will warm up as day progresses, however...so not slush, but...)

 

 


Sure. Come down to Baker where the snow is at least a bit drier. And, yes, even wider boards are called for, and more straightlining when the snow is mank. Snowboarders have some advantages less due to the surface area, than to the fact they never have to fight getting using independent feet. I've got more flotation on some of my skis than snowboarders. Then, it comes down to experience and most of all, balance.

 

 

 

post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by canali View Post

171

and i stand 166



the deal is its the chicken and the egg. I would have alot of trouble skiing a 171 ski in the conditions you describe, but I understand why you didnt buy the next size up. IE your not good enough to handle the next size up although on this day the next size up would have made life easier.

 

 

post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 



yet in all honesty given the amt of people who were also diving under the 1.5-+2ft of (heavier dense PNW) snow

that a wider board ie in 120-130 would have been more ideal for float...don't think 5cm-7cm would have made that much of a difference length wise...

(remember it was only 32F, so not light/fluffy but instead it was dense)

 

but I could be wrong, too!

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post





the deal is its the chicken and the egg. I would have alot of trouble skiing a 171 ski in the conditions you describe, but I understand why you didnt buy the next size up. IE your not good enough to handle the next size up although on this day the next size up would have made life easier.

 

 



 

post #7 of 18

PNW and West, 90mm -100mm daily driver, 115mm - 130mm powder specific ski. for maximum versatility and capability. after so much time here, you still showed up under-equipped.....un-possible.

 

no ski will just float on the surface without putting the right dynamic energy into it.

post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

the deal is its the chicken and the egg. I would have alot of trouble skiing a 171 ski in the conditions you describe, but I understand why you didnt buy the next size up. IE your not good enough to handle the next size up although on this day the next size up would have made life easier.

Hey, Bush,

....and you wonder why people think you're a cocky, arrogant a**hole. 

I'm known as someone who tells it like it is, even I find this overly-blunt.  How about some constructive, skill-level appropriate help or commentary rather than a put-down? 

 

 

post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 

Davluri:

 

lol,  yes I did come unprepared!...but heck I didn't expect a huge new dump of 50- 61cm of snow eek.gifin my neck of the woods.

...that's what I would have expected at whistler...and would have rented a pair of big ass pow skis for that sort of day.

(admittedly too i'm 20 lb overweight, so my extra 'heft' made my skis sink that much easier, too, i'm sure)

 

i think the 180mm waisted skis I talked about (garywayne skis / see link below)

a few months ago here would have sufficed quite amazingly in that 50-61cm dumping lol

http://www.garywayneskis.com/garywayneskis.com/Home.html

 

my skis right now, (given i stand 5'6'' / 167cm):

167 length  (82 waist) atomic blackeye (for groomer, packed out days, light amt of new snow)

171 length  (100 waist) atomic access (for more serious dumping of new snow/ungroomed)

next up...for when VERY serious dump days do arrive so I don't get caught off guard again

rolleyes.gifwho knows, maybe a gary wayne ski ... k2 pontoon (or other)

 


Edited by canali - 4/6/11 at 1:33pm
post #10 of 18


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tch View Post



Hey, Bush,

....and you wonder why people think you're a cocky, arrogant a**hole. 

I'm known as someone who tells it like it is, even I find this overly-blunt.  How about some constructive, skill-level appropriate help or commentary rather than a put-down? 

 

 

 

I dont wonder why I know why, the deal is it all a ploy .I would rather people see my side for what I am saying for right, no matter how it is said.  Also it weeds out people who ski with me, meaning that if you can take me on here, in person your going to be surprised.


BTW he thought he wasnt good enough to handle next size up, not me. He would have been better served by the longer skis on that day. Maybe fatter. ....

 

post #11 of 18

Skiing the PNWet pack for many years I kept moving up in ski width but it never seemed to make alot of difference in flotation. 5'10"@200lbs. Until I reached 122mm waisted skis,that was enough to get me high in the snow and carry my speed in the flats. Of course skill promotes out come. If the skis are RR then length isn't a big factor. 184cm/122mm waist skis can have a 16.5 TR.

post #12 of 18

Of course you would have trouble skiing a 171, you are probably closer to 6' than this persons 5'6".  I'm sure you also weigh more, are in better shape, and have more refined skiing skills.  These skis are the right length being 5cm or so taller than the skier.  You would probably need something in the high 180s or longer to be proportionally similar.  I think the OP should have been able to ski that ski on that day and that there is another issue at play here.  Yes a wider ski would have been easier, they always are, but why buy something like the Access in a length that's too long just in case you might wind up skiing it on a deep day when that extra length "might" help you?  I'm not sure what the next length up on that particular ski is.  Probably something like 178-181?  That seems too long for someone who is 5'6", even if they are 20lbs overweight.  IMO the OP might have been better off with a ski in the 171-174 range that was significantly wider.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post





the deal is its the chicken and the egg. I would have alot of trouble skiing a 171 ski in the conditions you describe, but I understand why you didnt buy the next size up. IE your not good enough to handle the next size up although on this day the next size up would have made life easier.

 

 



 

post #13 of 18

Just got off of Crystal Mountain today with about 15"-18" of the Northwests finest (it was quite good up high).  I skied a 90mm waist, some Nordica Helldiver CAs, and they worked just dandy.  Every powder ski in creation was out there and most were being skied quite poorly.  Pretty much any ski will work in the conditions you are describing; and wider will make it easier, but they are not a magic bullet that makes it all better.  Technique, attitude, and tactics make it happen; the skis just help. 

 

The most important tool in skiing sits between your ears and you don't get to replace.  An aggressive approach, tossed with a good balanced stance and skills,coated with a liberal coating of self-confidence, and cooked slowly over time makes skiing deep mashed potato's a tasty event.  (Think Weems 'sports diamond)

 

Try demoing some fatties, Canali; several different shapes, they do make it more fun.  Just remember to use them as a tool and not a cructch.

post #14 of 18

Except for conditions where you can power through heavy snow at high speeds, in an area with few terrain obstacles, the longer ski of the same model may not improve float in powder. What it does do for some skiers is put a lot more pressure on the tip and tail, pushing the skier around and preventing him from smearing a turn when needed and when trying to ski at slow to moderate speeds, in an area with many terrain obstacles, requiring numerous tight turns. Personally, I prefer a wide ski that is a little longer than my height, though I am so short as to affect the scale somewhat, at 158 cm tall, 140 lbs, with mostly around 175cm skis.

post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 

thanks everyone for your help....and bushwacker ipa I took no offence...(and TCH thanks for trying to offer me support via your post at bushwhacker)

 

I know off piste is something I'm getting into and am still wet behind the ears .. that said,. being 20lb overweight and in heavy snow (0C) didn't make learning this any easier for a novice in off piste at all, (LOL)

...this said, my observation did note the most successful in those heavier snow conditions were on steeper terrain, staying on top of the snow (being back on skis/boards, even wider ones) and moving more straightline down, not zigzagging...so i guess gettting and keeping momentum was key to success in those conditions.

 

....next yr one major goal is to really nail down off piste and such with some camps/lessons and a wider board

 

thank again everyone!...out 39x...and still with a goal of 50x in my sights.

 

cheers and happy skiing for the remainder of the season.


Edited by canali - 4/10/11 at 9:52am
post #16 of 18

I would say don't blame the skis, just keep working on your skills. You need a lot of skill and stamina to ski off-piste in the heavy, damp snow we get around Vancouver, BC. I do most of my skiing at Grouse Mountain (right next to Cypress Mountain). What we call "powder" here is nothing like the champagne powder you find in the Rockies. The North Shore mountains near Vancouver are just about the worst place I can think to learn and perfect off-piste skiing. If you are living in the Vancouver area, I would suggest heading to south Mt. Baker or north to Whistler where the conditions are a bit drier that the coastal marine climate of Cypress, and the runs are a lot longer.

post #17 of 18

Like others have already said, it's too easy to focus on the skis.  You said yourself that it was easier to manage on steeper terrain. This is logical as the gravity will take you down in a hurry and you can pretty much maintain your "normal" stance while skiing.  However, when you get to terrain that is not quite that steep and the powder is deep and heavy, you do need to lean back at least a bit, even with the new wide rocker designs.  This will take technique and leg strength, and skiing powder is hard on the legs even if your technique is good.

post #18 of 18

In a situation like you describe, its actually easier to ski steeper runs where you can get going fast enough to ski in good rythm rather than flatter stuff where you have to be very patient for float and work just to keep going. $.02.


Edited by tromano - 4/7/11 at 6:44pm
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