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ski pole issues

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

 i noticed that when i plant my pole at the beginning of the turn, the tip of the pole hits the snow unless i lift my forearm.  does this happen to anyone else?

(i am 5'-10" and use 50" poles.)

post #2 of 21
Too long,with pole turned upside down put hand under basket. Forearm should be perpendicular to ground or a little lower. That is a pretty good indicator.
post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daveski7 View Post

Too long,with pole turned upside down put hand under basket. Forearm should be perpendicular to ground or a little lower. That is a pretty good indicator.


but that's the strange part...this is how i was fitted for the pole.  my elbow is at 90 deg w/ hand under the basket...... does anyone have their elbow more than 90 deg (towards the floor)??

post #4 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by guitar73 View Post

 i noticed that when i plant my pole at the beginning of the turn, the tip of the pole hits the snow unless i lift my forearm.  does this happen to anyone else?

(i am 5'-10" and use 50" poles.)

 

I'm slightly confused as to what you're describing.  How can you plant a pole and not have the tip touch the ground?

 

I'm 6'2 with 52 inch poles and have been thinking about getting shorter poles myself despite them being the "correct" size according to the stand and grab measuring technique.  I think it's just because I ski a lot of bumped up snow and am often planting on a bit different level than where my feet are.  I also try to stay forward with my knees flexed a fair amount, so I might just be "losing" some height there.  I'm considering a pair of 50" or possibly even a 48" pair that I'd take out when I know I'm going to be skiing mainly bumps.  I tried a friends 48 inch pair on some steep stuff once, and felt I was reaching too far.  So I wouldn't make it my full time pole.  
 

 

post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 

the ski pole tips hit the ground before the actual pole plant (during the swing motion forward).  i also tend to keep my knees flexed and my body forward throughout my skiing. 

post #6 of 21

You should probably be in a 48"pole(try the measuring with shoes off), When I said a little less I actually meant morethan 90 degrees or forearm closer to ground if you will. Shorten them a little bit and try them again.  Heat up the grips and take them off. Measure down the same amount on both poles and either use a hack saw or a sawzall and bang grips back on.  Pretty easy,try that and see what happens.

post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by guitar73 View Post

 i also tend to keep my knees flexed and my body forward throughout my skiing. 

 

You are in the correct skiing position.

 

Before cutting your poles or buying new ones, borrow some from a friend or maybe the lost & found. see if you like having shorter poles. I prefer shorter poles except when I'm on the flats, where shorter poles don't move you as far on each push :) I'm 5'9" and ski with 46"
 

 

post #8 of 21

I'm not sure that this is something that can correctly be addressed without seeing you ski.  The problem could be pole length or it could be technique, but there is no way to know from here. 

post #9 of 21

mtcyclist you bring up a very good point, I was just going by his height at 5'10", a 50" pole is pretty tall IMO.That is why I suggested a little bit at a time, until comfortable,not taking the whole thing at once.Video would be good ,you are correct.

post #10 of 21

Quote:

Originally Posted by JHoback View Post



 

You are in the correct skiing position.

 

Before cutting your poles or buying new ones, borrow some from a friend or maybe the lost & found. see if you like having shorter poles. I prefer shorter poles except when I'm on the flats, where shorter poles don't move you as far on each push :) I'm 5'9" and ski with 46"
 

 

Agree! When it comes to poles, there isn't a 'correct' length that works for everyone based on height.  There was a thread on here a few months back talking about the new tendancy to go with shorter poles because of changing techniques and styles of skiing.  I am 5'11 and currently use a 44" pole, although I ski mostly moguls so that could have something to do with it.  Echoing the thoughts above; you should try some loaners in different lengths before cutting or replacing your current ones.  And as for the shorter ones being worse on the flats; you just need to develop a good skating technique and you'll still be faster than any polers out there.

 

 

post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by guitar73 View Post

the ski pole tips hit the ground before the actual pole plant (during the swing motion forward).  i also tend to keep my knees flexed and my body forward throughout my skiing. 


Oooooh that makes way more sense than what I was imagining.  Sorry for being dumb.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by JHoback View Post



Before cutting your poles or buying new ones, borrow some from a friend or maybe the lost & found. see if you like having shorter poles. I prefer shorter poles except when I'm on the flats, where shorter poles don't move you as far on each push :) I'm 5'9" and ski with 46"
 

 


I actually picked up a pair of 50s from a thrift store for this very purpose.  I haven't gotten them out on the slopes yet though.  I keep bringing them to the hill, but then get to having such a good time that I don't want to go grab them from the car to see if it rectifies a minor feeling of improper sizing.  So I guess I can't complain too much. smile.gif

 

post #12 of 21
Thread Starter 

thanks for the feedback!  i'm not too worried about wrecking my poles; they were "free" (k2 automatic) when i bought my skis.  i've been meaning to cut them down for a while now but just wasn't sure if it was the "right" thing to do. basically, i don't like how they feel now. 

 

@marcusbrody....  lol, i should have been more clear about when they were hitting the ground in my initial post. ;)

post #13 of 21

Through my skiing experiences, Ive noticed a foldable ski pole would be great. I think this would help with storage and a foldable ski pole would be great for transportation. Any thoughts??smile.gif

post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by westcoastski67 View Post

Through my skiing experiences, Ive noticed a foldable ski pole would be great. I think this would help with storage and a foldable ski pole would be great for transportation. Any thoughts??smile.gif

 

Backcountry skiers use them all the time and seem to like them a lot. A few of my friends will even bring theirs out when we're skiing lift-served when they want to either try different pole lengths or just use the powder baskets while having smaller baskets on their other poles.

 

I almost bought a pair of Black Diamond Traverse poles the other day thinking I could take it with me on a coming a trip. They are a two section pole though and it looks like that even completely split, they would be too long for my suitcase. Oh well.

post #15 of 21

Pole length also varies by terrain and skier preference.  Shorter for bumps and park, longer for steeps and powder for example.  One thing I notice when trying out different poles is that longer ones tend to push me a little back seat.

 

 

FWIW, I'm 5'9" and prefer a 48".  I prefer them with forearm parallel to ground planted while in skis and boots, a little longer than parallel in street shoes or barefoot.  They do make me look kinda silly in the bumps though...

 


Edited by crgildart - 3/5/13 at 7:36am
post #16 of 21
Never mind.
post #17 of 21

At 5'11" I have used 50" poles and 48" poles and for Xmas my wife bought me some new poles that are marked 48" but actually measure 47.5.  I didn't think there would be much difference but I prefer the shorter ones.   I haven't used the 50's in some time as I felt like they were too long for my stance and they were ridiculous in moguls.  

post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcusBrody View Post

 

Backcountry skiers use them all the time and seem to like them a lot. A few of my friends will even bring theirs out when we're skiing lift-served when they want to either try different pole lengths or just use the powder baskets while having smaller baskets on their other poles.

 

I almost bought a pair of Black Diamond Traverse poles the other day thinking I could take it with me on a coming a trip. They are a two section pole though and it looks like that even completely split, they would be too long for my suitcase. Oh well.

Traverses are too long for a carry on bag. They are bomber poles--I've run over them with my car twice (once backwards, then forwards, duh.) Why should the same pole length work for all conditions?--powder, firm, bumps all require different lengths.  I wouldn't buy another pair of fixed length poles. OTOH my kid skis with a pair that are way too short for him and he kicks my butt.  So correct pole length is unfortunately not the only factor.

post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by guitar73 View Post

the ski pole tips hit the ground before the actual pole plant (during the swing motion forward).  i also tend to keep my knees flexed and my body forward throughout my skiing. 

 

Rotate your hands into a flat-handlebar (mountain bike) position instead of a roadbike (reaching for the hoods) position.   

 

If you pop over to HH's website, he's doing this in just about every pic.

 

 

The bigger the edge angles you achieve, the closer your upper body will be to the snow.      Either you stick the poles out to the sides or you stick your hands way, way out in front of you like a racer.     I don't see any other choices.


Edited by cantunamunch - 3/5/13 at 6:06pm
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcusBrody View Post

 

Backcountry skiers use them all the time and seem to like them a lot. A few of my friends will even bring theirs out when we're skiing lift-served when they want to either try different pole lengths or just use the powder baskets while having smaller baskets on their other poles.

 

I almost bought a pair of Black Diamond Traverse poles the other day thinking I could take it with me on a coming a trip. They are a two section pole though and it looks like that even completely split, they would be too long for my suitcase. Oh well.

Yeah I have the same problem, the poles would be too long for my suitcase. I need some poles that collaspe to fit in my suitcase. It would be better for storage, cause the poles are way too lengthy.

post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by guitar73 View Post

 i noticed that when i plant my pole at the beginning of the turn, the tip of the pole hits the snow unless i lift my forearm.  does this happen to anyone else?

(i am 5'-10" and use 50" poles.)


I'm 5' - 9" and ski with 53' poles and I can't think how that would happen.  Try keeping your hands up higher and out in front where you can see them like you're gonna put a 24 pack of beer on the roof of a Honda. Then just "flick" your poles like two pendulums to tap the snow.  I used to use shorter poles but I got tired of reaching to plant them in the steeper stuff.  It threw my rythm off.  I find the longer poles used as mentioned keeps my upper body more quiet.

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