New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Left and Right skis?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Question.

 

OK. I have friend and his wife who are new to the sport. They have these newer K2 skis. Nice skis. Got 15 days on said skis.

 

The problem. I checked the edges and oddly the right edge is duller than the left edge on both sets. I also noted that each pair has an R on one ski and an L on the other. How 1970s. They only use the R ski on the right foot and the L on the left.

 

Would this cause one to have uneven wear on one's edges? Side to side.

post #2 of 12

Their turns must be very uneven (the right turn very different from the left turn) to get both right edges dull and both left edges not. Normally you'd expect both the inside edges be duller than the outside edges when keeping a left and a right ski.

post #3 of 12

Maybe they always hockey stop to the same side.

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

Correction. One side is duller on each ski.

 

Thanks for the replies

post #5 of 12

That's perfectly normal... inside edge of outside ski takes a whole lot more beating then inside edge of inside ski (majority of weight, and therefore pressure goes on outside ski). So when you look on both skis, you will see both inside edges (inside edge of outside ski) are much duller then outside edges (inside edge of inside ski).

post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post

That's perfectly normal... inside edge of outside ski takes a whole lot more beating then inside edge of inside ski (majority of weight, and therefore pressure goes on outside ski). So when you look on both skis, you will see both inside edges (inside edge of outside ski) are much duller then outside edges (inside edge of inside ski).


Both inside edges would be normal, but both right edges or both left edges, not so much.

 

post #7 of 12

As an ex-racer I know first hand how important it is to ski on both edges evenly. Altough there is a L&R ski, you always want to switch around your edges every other time you head out. Therefore, ski on L&R for a few days then switch to R&L.

In racing we do this for training edges and race edges.

post #8 of 12

Allegedly there is a technical reason for setting the release for L or R.

 

Good edges are critical and like the race kids who only have a single pair of skis do ... tune both and warm up on one and for the race switch.

 

For a long weekend, you can switch mid point and still have a good edge.

 

It is far better (pro and con to everything), to dress your own edges between tunes at a minimum but refrain from getting those on the ski deck, $5 or $10 wax and sharpen garbage machine tunes every weekend.  Watching those monster ski molesters on the sun deck with the sparks flying made my blood run cold.

 

post #9 of 12

A USSA coach once told me most National/WC circuit techs do race tune race ski's left and right and subtly mark them as such. I've heard others say that's "old school", but when asked they said they never raced. Guess until we meet a top tech we'll have to guess. Any race or factory tech's out there answer this?

post #10 of 12

It depends on racer... for some inside and outside edge is done same, for some it's done differently. Noone is skiing on both legs, and more or less all weight goes to outside leg, so on the end it comes to personal preference if you want outside edge of inside ski sharp or not. Some like it some don't. But every single ski is marked so you know it's left or right one... even if edges on both are prepared same way.


 

post #11 of 12

Dull edges on the same side on 2 pair is not a common happening, I suspect that they are always stopping on the same side and  never change skiis from boot to boot, or they are putting those edges on a hard surface  and causing the edges to wear fster. This might be a foot rest on a chair lift and they always put the skis on the same way.    I would start with a fresh edge tune and cover the  R&L  marks on the skis then check them after  5 days of skiing.  What are the conditions they are skiing? Hard pack, or power.

 

post #12 of 12
If the skis are "noted" with a L and R ( by felt marker) or sticker,,then you have a personalized hand tuned ski!

Let me explain.

A "demanding" skier hand tunes the skis for his/her ability level and type of terrain and conditions! No machine tune can do this as well as a hand tune,,,,by a experience tuner!

All my skis are tuned with a R and L indication! In my case I have a red sticker for right ski!

What is the difference between skis ( in the recreational skiing context) ?

All my skis have a very sharp inner beveled edge at tip and tails! Thus the right ski has a very sharp INSIDE edge from the point of contact of the ski on snow to about 30 cm. towards center of ski!
The other edge ( outside edge) is not as sharp ( not as beveled) and is ever so slightly dulled at initial point of contact of the ski to snow !

You are probably wonder why this detail? Why be so ,,,,,,,,

For me,, I have found that the most dangerous part of the ski terrain is at the very end of the runs,,the flats!!! That is where I relax, that is where I am tired and that is where the surface is uneven due to many skiers converging to one spot,,,the lift !

The modern ski is designed to be on edge,,,,,,like a trained guard dog it looks for "scent",,that curve ! One small tilt to the outside will result in a instant carve on the outside edge! That dulled outside edge gives me a "safety zone" !!!

During the ski season,,I also tune daily with a diamond stick,,,, take out the dings and nicks on the inside edges! When I do a full tune in my shop,I pay particular attention to my inside edges since they are my primary working edges!

That is why I believe the skis you have are "dulled" in the manner noted!

Hope this helps you!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs