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How much vertical is a "good day"??? - Page 6

post #151 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by DesiredUsername View Post

I'm sure I speak for everyone here on Epicski when I say how very, very proud of you we all are, and in awe of your awesomeness, not to mention being extremely jealous of where you live.

Wait. Is your name Josh? I might know you from someplace......

 

All you epicski folks out there are just jealous,

 

All you guys ever talk about are steep, bumps, trees & powder. Let me tell you, most of the world is made up of groomers.

It is not that you can't ski groomers. It is you can't ski and the groomers proves it. :eek    

post #152 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post

It is not that you can't ski groomers. It is you can't ski and the groomers proves it. eek.gif     

Touché,

Well played, KingGrump smile.gif
post #153 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Now that you've resuscitated this oldie, everyone's going to tell you there's more to skiing than vert.

Yep. I ski for the whole mountain experience. If I can side step a couple of stashes and get some thigh deep for a half day, I'm good. The room mate on the other hand spends his day gawking at his phone and posting telemetry to FB while he is on the hill lapping groomers to get down the hill faster. There is more to skiing than vert. :deadhorse:

post #154 of 168
I'm not going to say I'm UNconscious of my vert. It's useful data to me in assessing fitness. But it doesn't impact my choices throughout the day ever since I slammed into a tree years ago when I was in 18th place, trying to improve that number. I'd like to finish in the top 100 and that's it now. There's a huge gap in vert between the top guys and number 100.... Several seasons worth.
post #155 of 168
Quote:

43 runs in one day

57.7 vertical feet in one day

52.6 horizontal miles in one day

53.1 mph sustained speed for the day

66.5 mph maximum speed for the day.

 

Here is some more stats from the phone app:

4h26m58s Lift Time (hours, minutes, seconds)

2h05m06s Slope Time

6m21s Rest Time (a guy has to purge every once in a while) and think thru ski gear too.

 

.......... Here's the difference between every ski area (that I know of) and Big Sky............no lift lines[???].

I'm wondering if the Lone Peak tram was running that day.  If it was running:

1) I would be using it for quality over quantity, and most people here know I'm a numbers junkie and have tracked vertical of every day since I started skiing in 1976. See post #104 in this thread.

2) The Lone Peak tram almost always has LONG lift lines, 35 minutes commonly when conditions are good. 

3) The skiing from Lone Peak is technical with fall consequences, so you're a rock star if you're skiing that at high speed and under control. 

 

Therefore I think it would be very difficult to ski that kind of vertical with even a few tram runs included. 

 

So presume SuperG is a local who found something else interesting to do on a day when Big Sky's best terrain was not available. IMHO Big Sky is not an easy mountain to rack up big vertical.  The ratio of length to vertical of most of the lower mountain lifts is quite high.  That's going to limit your vertical even with high speed lifts vs. a place like Sun Valley where the groomers and fast lifts have consistent steeper fall lines.


Edited by Tony Crocker - 10/9/15 at 11:49am
post #156 of 168

How much vertical is a good day?

 

1

 

When you go from horizontal to vertical first thing in the morning, that's a good day.

post #157 of 168
57000 is a good day any way you slice it. The year Tony Cooper logged 5.6 million I know he had 60k days. If I recall he even missed some days early on. Having once logged a 51901 day, my hat is off to those people. I certainly have no desire to do something that stupid again. Because I know that the desire to break a personal record clouded my knowledge that I was tired and should be packing it in. (That wasn't the tree day.)
post #158 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperG View Post
 

The answer to your question is "any day skiing is a good day". But every once in a while the planets align, the grooming crew laid it out just right, and no one is in front of you. All the way to the bottom. What's a child to do??

 

I live life and ski at the BIGGEST SKIING IN AMERICA , Big Sky Montana. I use TraceSnow to track my whereabouts and other stats. You can look up my account (SuperG) from last year. Check out Jan. 11, 2014.

43 runs in one day

57.7 vertical feet in one day

52.6 horizontal miles in one day

53.1 mph sustained speed for the day

66.5 mph maximum speed for the day.

 

Here is some more stats from the phone app:

4h26m58s Lift Time (hours, minutes, seconds)

2h05m06s Slope Time

6m21s Rest Time (a guy has to purge every once in a while) and think thru ski gear too.

 

I spent a couple years in Winter Park and crushed a lot of vertical. Here's the difference between every ski area (that I know of) and Big Sky............no lift lines. I'm skiing right onto the first chair by myself, nearly every lap. Maybe 2 to 3 people skiing in a group away from my preferred line. Now that's a good day!

 

So to answer your question "How much vertical is a "good day"???"

 

Depends on where you ski.

 

Watch my numbers this season.

 

SuperG

post #159 of 168

What does "53.1 mph sustained speed for the day" mean?

 

The OP also said that he skied 52.6 miles in just over 2 hours. So average speed was close to 25 mph.

 

I am also skeptical of the accuracy of a GPS phone app that is communicating with a cell tower a few miles away and a satellite that is 10s of thousands of miles away.

post #160 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post
 

What does "53.1 mph sustained speed for the day" mean?

 

The OP also said that he skied 52.6 miles in just over 2 hours. So average speed was close to 25 mph.

 

I am also skeptical of the accuracy of a GPS phone app that is communicating with a cell tower a few miles away and a satellite that is 10s of thousands of miles away.

While I am also skeptical of the accuracy of the GPS phone app, as it turns out this is not the OP.  He posted a two year bump in a thread that was started in 2011.  He has not posted since.  Guess he was skiing too fast to stick around.

post #161 of 168

Ahh time to revisit this train wreck.  My thoughts of late are the answer for me is... enough so that I feel like I got my money's worth but not so much that I can't walk or drive home the next day without severe pain LOL!

post #162 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

 

I am also skeptical of the accuracy of a GPS phone app that is communicating with a cell tower a few miles away and a satellite that is 10s of thousands of miles away.

 

Your phone doesn't communicate with the GPS satellites. The satellites simply transmit a time signal that your phone can read, and based on the difference between the signals from different satellites, the phone can calculate where you are on the earth. It requires you to get a signal from 4 satellites or more to work. But the distance to the satellites really doesn't matter at all, since the signal is coming at you constantly. And most skiing apps that I've seen don't base your location on the cell towers at all I don't think.

 

Any error in the apps is more likely due to a bad signal (blocked or dropped GPS signals), or strange calculations being made in the app itself, than any issues with the system. Overall, I've found the GPS calculation in the one I use (SkiTracks) to be pretty darn accurate in a general sense based on running it while driving around. But accounting for the turns and subtle slopes encountered while skiing can still throw it off a bit.  

post #163 of 168

I used to have fun bombing every run to see how may laps I could do.. and that was back in the rope tow days so you had to stand and hang on to a thick, heavy rope zipping up the hill at 15-20 mph.  I rolled like that way up until I was like 14 years old and learned to turn and ski bumps.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperG View Post
 

The answer to your question is "any day skiing is a good day". But every once in a while the planets align, the grooming crew laid it out just right, and no one is in front of you. All the way to the bottom. What's a child to do??

 

I live life and ski at the BIGGEST SKIING IN AMERICA , Big Sky Montana. I use TraceSnow to track my whereabouts and other stats. You can look up my account (SuperG) from last year. Check out Jan. 11, 2014.

43 runs in one day

57.7 vertical feet in one day

52.6 horizontal miles in one day

53.1 mph sustained speed for the day

66.5 mph maximum speed for the day.

 

Here is some more stats from the phone app:

4h26m58s Lift Time (hours, minutes, seconds)

2h05m06s Slope Time

6m21s Rest Time (a guy has to purge every once in a while) and think thru ski gear too.

 

I spent a couple years in Winter Park and crushed a lot of vertical. Here's the difference between every ski area (that I know of) and Big Sky............no lift lines. I'm skiing right onto the first chair by myself, nearly every lap. Maybe 2 to 3 people skiing in a group away from my preferred line. Now that's a good day!

 

So to answer your question "How much vertical is a "good day"???"

 

Depends on where you ski.

 

Watch my numbers this season.

 

SuperG

I used to have fun bombing every run to see how may laps I could do.. and that was back in the rope tow days so you had to stand and hang on to a thick, heavy rope zipping up the hill at 15-20 mph. 

 

 

 

 

I rolled like that way up until I was like 14 years old and learned to turn and ski bumps.:newkeyboard:

post #164 of 168

A bad day on the snow...it still a good day, no matter how many vertical. 

post #165 of 168
GPS is extremely accurate to within 1/10th of an inch when using 5+ satellites and using sensative surveying equipment and a clear view of the sky for 30-45min. when setting a point on a piece of property out in the middle of nowhere. A phone will be within a meter or 2 provided you picked up atleast 3 satellites at the top of your run when you started downhill and 3 at the bottom when you finished your run. In between really does not matter. Unless you hit a mid-staton. Anyway....any day with a board or skis on my feet sliding down a hill is a good day of skiing to me.
post #166 of 168
A phone cannot triangulate your position without 3 towers. 2 towers will show within a few hundred yards give or take...and one tower can only determine your postion relative to your direction within that towers broadcast distance. Which is usually within 2 miles give or take. So phone apps. Are only so good unless it is something like epicmix where it reads every time you enter a lift. Still does not count hike to stuff above the lift you got off of.
Edited by Double-D - 10/10/15 at 9:47pm
post #167 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

A bad day on the snow...it still a good day, no matter how many vertical. 
+1
post #168 of 168
Sometimes one great run is all it takes!
Edited by Blue Streak - 10/10/15 at 11:27pm
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