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Blizzard The One, Fischer Watea 98, Salomon Shogun

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Looking at skis in the 98mm-ish waist range to replace the Icelantic Pilgrims I sold.  Talked with several folks and read a lot of great info. on this site to narrow things down so far to these 3.  I would love to hear pros/cons from folks who have skied all 3, or at least a couple of these skis.

 

I am 5'10", 165 lb, Level 7/8 skier, 48 y.o., primarily East coast (VT - Smugglers, Killington,etc.).  Looking for something with some of the playful characteristics of the Pilgrims ... would like to go a bit wider to handle post-storm crud conditions (or the rare East powder runs before skied up into crud!).  Working more and more on glades and bumps, but there will still be plenty of time on groomed runs getting to and exiting glades/bumps and cruising for fun.  Trying to find a nice mix of performance attributes with a big sweet spot/ forgiveness when I'm lazy and technique-challenged!  As a reference, I did demo the Sultan 94 and found them to do everything well, but did not love the feel ... a bit too damp and less playful.

 

Thanks for your help.

post #2 of 17
Thread Starter 

Any opinions on your comparative experiences with these skis would be greatly appreciated!

 

Thanks.

post #3 of 17

Level 7+ 165lb. I've tried the Sultan 94's in the 184 several days after the last snow. It was great on the groomers and more than I could handle on bumps and crud. Probably would have enjoyed the 177 but it was not available. I was shopping for a ski to compliment a 172/84 and I thought a Sultan 94 was too close to what I already had.

A Faction Alias 179 in the same conditions was more fun but also clearly a more powder oriented ski. Neither ski was designed for the conditions I had when I demoed them. I realized the Alias was obviously good in soft snow but I wanted a little more side cut for bumps and trees.

Based on reviews here and elsewhere I decided The One was a ski that would work for me most days so I bought a used 177 without trying it. I skied it for 7 straight days at big Sky in soft snow and really like it. I think it is a very good every day/every where ski when the snow is soft. 

post #4 of 17

I've spent a few days on the 182 Shogun.  I think the Shogun is great for powder and nearly perfect for post-storm crud, but I would say it's fairly damp and not super playful.  For me, it felt a little lumbering on groomers. It is fairly forgiving though. 

post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveturner View Post
Based on reviews here and elsewhere I decided The One was a ski that would work for me most days so I bought a used 177 without trying it. I skied it for 7 straight days at big Sky in soft snow and really like it. I think it is a very good every day/every where ski when the snow is soft. 


Thanks ... this is good feedback.  Have you by any chance had any opportunity to try the Watea 98?  I think I am down to The One vs. Watea 98.

post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcross View Post

I've spent a few days on the 182 Shogun.  I think the Shogun is great for powder and nearly perfect for post-storm crud, but I would say it's fairly damp and not super playful.  For me, it felt a little lumbering on groomers. It is fairly forgiving though. 



Thanks ... I am definitely a fan of the more playful feel.

post #7 of 17

I have been on the 173 Shogun for about 100 days and it is a ski that likes to be skied. It works great in all conditions except for true boiler plate. I am skiing it 1.5 ahead of the line so it pivots quicker and move it back only on the deepest days. I tell everyone you need to ski it in third gear before the ski comes alive and then its super playful and it is a little work on flatter groomers as noted. It is a ski that will reward you the harder you push it. When there is cover I mostly ski trees and bumps. I would recommend trying a ski like "The One" before purchasing. For some people I ski with it's "the one" (a few own it) others not so much (I know where you can get a good deal on a pair of 184's). I skied the Rossi S3 (similar to The One) for a couple of days and found it to be kind of a one trick pony. Loved soft snow but very numb everywhere else. Very easy to over power and I'm only 160lbs. The Watea 98 looks like a good compromise of early rise vs rocker although I've never skied it nor know anyone currently on it. Hope that helps. 

post #8 of 17

If it doesn't have to be 98, might I suggest the 2011 Volkl Bridge; they are 128/95/11 w/ slight rocker.  I demo'd at K-ton over the 2/24 weekend (when they got 18" of snow).  It was a blast in the fresh, the bumps, and the woods.

 

Based on that experience, I picked up a set (187) last week.  Took them up to MRG/Sugarbush this past weekend.  At the top of both mountains, it was sweet with aout 6-8" of fresh in the woods (I guess some blew in from 3-4" they got).  Lower mountain was classic spring stuff:  soft bumps and slushy heavy snow as the day wore on.  The Bridge was great in the woods and super fun in the bumps...but, the best part was what a great ski it was in the thick, heavy spring snow.  It floated right over it.

 

It worked alright in the icy spots, but that's not really what it's made for.  All in all, a great ski and exaclty what I was looking for.

 

BTW: I ski OK and weigh 240 w/ gear.

 

-Smarty  

 

 

post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 

Just the kind of feedback I need.  Thanks.  I know enough about myself and the ski feel that works best for me that what you describe here suggests the Shogun would not be a great match.  I will not get out again this year, but will try to find a way to demo The One and the Watea 98.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mittersill View Post

I have been on the 173 Shogun for about 100 days and it is a ski that likes to be skied. It works great in all conditions except for true boiler plate. I am skiing it 1.5 ahead of the line so it pivots quicker and move it back only on the deepest days. I tell everyone you need to ski it in third gear before the ski comes alive and then its super playful and it is a little work on flatter groomers as noted. It is a ski that will reward you the harder you push it. When there is cover I mostly ski trees and bumps. I would recommend trying a ski like "The One" before purchasing. For some people I ski with it's "the one" (a few own it) others not so much (I know where you can get a good deal on a pair of 184's). I skied the Rossi S3 (similar to The One) for a couple of days and found it to be kind of a one trick pony. Loved soft snow but very numb everywhere else. Very easy to over power and I'm only 160lbs. The Watea 98 looks like a good compromise of early rise vs rocker although I've never skied it nor know anyone currently on it. Hope that helps. 



 

post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smartyiak View Post

If it doesn't have to be 98, might I suggest the 2011 Volkl Bridge; they are 128/95/11 w/ slight rocker.  I demo'd at K-ton over the 2/24 weekend (when they got 18" of snow).  It was a blast in the fresh, the bumps, and the woods.

 

 


I was actually going to recommend the Bridges also.  I demoed a bunch of skis this year and the Bridge was the most playful.  It's a very solid ski, great in crud, not too stiff.  It makes you want to duck into the trees.  

 

post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcross View Post




I was actually going to recommend the Bridges also.  I demoed a bunch of skis this year and the Bridge was the most playful.  It's a very solid ski, great in crud, not too stiff.  It makes you want to duck into the trees.  

 


Do you mind sharing what kind of skier you are and how much you weigh?  If you have some comparisons based on some of the other skis you demo'd, that would help quite a bit as well.

 

Thanks.

 

post #12 of 17

FWIW: I skied the Bridge out west a couple of weeks ago at Snowbasin in 8" of fresh, then cut-up, then hardpack.  I really liked them.  Found them to be everything Mcross said above.  My only question was about feel; they have a bit of a "harsh", non-damped feel to them.  But then again, I have liked heavy, damped skis (I own the Dynastar 4x4) and your own reaction may be different.  What I consider to be a tiny bit brittle, you might consider fun and light. 

I am 5'8" and weigh 175 and I skied the 170.  Probably wanted one size larger, but they didn't have it.  However, I never felt handicapped by lack of length (I'm a short radius kind of guy).

 

post #13 of 17

Based on everything you've said, The One would be the perfect fit...I haven't skied the Watea 98, but have heard it is not as playful as The One.  I'm similar in weight/height/ability as you, but I am based on the west coast, and found the 177 The One to be pretty much exactly what you described you were looking for.

- It's very versatile...as other One owners have noted, it's performance on firmer snow sets it apart from similar skis like the S3.  Part of this is likely due to it being a "slow rise" design..the early rise tip and tail are subtle because it doesn't go very high and extends over a long portion of the ski.  They pretty much feel like conventional skis when carving up groomers...(and you're likely to be quite surprised/impressed with how they respond relative to waist width.  For someone who is used to skiing a 78-88mm waisted all-mountain ski, The One will make complete sense from day one - very little change in technique required

- Feel is somewhat damp yet there is quite a bit of snow-feel, feedback.  Lots of energy and generous sweet spot. They are not a stiff ski longitudinally, but are rather stiff torsionally.  Also are very light in weight.   So they have good float in 3D snow, but are not noodly at all when things firm up.  That said, we don't get ice out here too much, so I don't know that it would be the best choice for boilerplate.  They are definitely a ski that you can have fun on without your "A" game, but they come alive most with active, playful input; not really a ski designed for "cruising"   

- As others have noted, they are a very playful, turn-on-a-dime ski that excel in tight spaces like tight trees, chutes...they may have a speed limit (certainly not a low one), but given your size, it's unlikely to be an issue, especially if your based in the east.

- Tip deflection is minimal due to the low rise, so they shine in most post-storm conditions...in fact that may be an ideal use for them, hunting for/playing in pow stashes in less traveled terrain and trees.

 

 

post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all of the great feedback.  It does not appear that many people have been on or shared comments about the Watea 98.  If some of you who have been on that ski could comment, I would greatly appreciate it!  Thanks again.

post #15 of 17

Hey, not sure if you're still looking at this point, but I am 5'9, 185 and tried out the Dynastar 6th Sense Slice, the Shogun and the Watea 94 last year. The Dynastar probably isn't what you're looking for because it seemed a bit heavy to me. Powered through crud like a pro and carved well, but I wouldn't call it playful. The Shogun I felt was a littler lighter, but too soft in the tip and just floated over all of the crud that the Dynastar was pushing through - I didn't feel like I could push myself on the Shogun like I wanted to. Now the Watea 94 was a perfect balance between those two. It was light and playful, but because of the powder hull was able to push through a lot of the crud like the Dynastar. The only thing I didn't like about the 94 was that I felt like the tail got caught in the crud a little bit. Since I tried the Watea in 170, I'm thinking the Watea 98 in 176 will be the best of both worlds. I'm an east coaster too out in CO this weekend, so if I have any luck finding them to demp tomorrow I'll update my impressions.

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smartyiak View Post

If it doesn't have to be 98, might I suggest the 2011 Volkl Bridge; they are 128/95/11 w/ slight rocker.  I demo'd at K-ton over the 2/24 weekend (when they got 18" of snow).  It was a blast in the fresh, the bumps, and the woods.

 

Based on that experience, I picked up a set (187) last week.  Took them up to MRG/Sugarbush this past weekend.  At the top of both mountains, it was sweet with aout 6-8" of fresh in the woods (I guess some blew in from 3-4" they got).  Lower mountain was classic spring stuff:  soft bumps and slushy heavy snow as the day wore on.  The Bridge was great in the woods and super fun in the bumps...but, the best part was what a great ski it was in the thick, heavy spring snow.  It floated right over it.

 

It worked alright in the icy spots, but that's not really what it's made for.  All in all, a great ski and exaclty what I was looking for.

 

BTW: I ski OK and weigh 240 w/ gear.

 

-Smarty  

 

i agree.  I just picked these up last March and skied the Beast Nov 1 and 2.  Nov 1 was colder, so less spring-like conditions, and I enjoyed them.  I have 179's (an upgrade from 165 carving skis) and I don't think I am going back.  Just cant wait for a little pow to see the true potential of these.  It was top rated ski by Freeski mag last year.



 

post #17 of 17
Well after my first ski trip of the year (keystone) i didnt have any luck finding the watea 98s to try out, but did end up with a very impressive 2012 volkl mantra. For the width, these things carved great and were a lot of fun. They were a bit lighter than i remember the dynqstar slicer being, but slightly less playful than when i tried the watea 94. Note though that the only trails open were groomed and turned to ice/bumps. You should definitely try these out for a wide east coast ski because they handled well in those conditions, but i personally would still like to compare them to a ski like the watea wih some tail rocker.
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