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Hydration: what are you packing? - Page 2

post #31 of 52

I will throw a water bottle and a gator aide in the trees, on a Sunday might even make a mimosa in a water bottle and stash that as well.

post #32 of 52

What kind of ski site is this.  31 posts and mostly talk about how much water you drink.  Beer is the sustainer of life and used to be the official drink of ski bums everywhere.  What is the world coming to. I suppose that you have some foo foo cocktail at the end of the day.  Sad,  very sad.     beercheer.gif

post #33 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by brownie_bear View Post

What kind of ski site is this.  31 posts and mostly talk about how much water you drink.  Beer is the sustainer of life and used to be the official drink of ski bums everywhere.  What is the world coming to. I suppose that you have some foo foo cocktail at the end of the day.  Sad,  very sad.     beercheer.gif



What is sad is if you are drinking during the day while skiing.....plenty of time for that after the lifts close...

 

post #34 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpfreaq View Post





 

Yeah, I wouldn't consume the snow back in the Detroit area but out here in CO it's pretty tasty =)



 

 A good case of giardia will cure you of using any snow off the ground.

post #35 of 52

http://www.cellfood.com/cellfood.htm    Sorry, had to put link first,browser issue or something, Newb mistake I'm sure. Anyway I have been using said product for years as part of replenish- detox plan. It works great and had been recommended by my nutritionist. If you added the whole days worth to a bottle of water and carried with it would take care of a lot of issues I'm sure. I hope to try it out as a cheat for getting used to thin Colorado air and lack of oxygen next year.Should help run at max cap. a lot faster. Hope you check it out. I get most of my stuff at Vita Cost.com, usually cheap prices and sometimes free/cheap shipping. Hope this helps some peeps.

post #36 of 52

Oops. site is just cellfood.com , my bad

post #37 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimski View Post

I take: (a) water in a Camelbak Zoid, and (b) my kids.  The Zoid is so cool, the kids fight over who gets to carry it.


Thanks for the name of that pack--I saw a guy with one of these months ago and hadn't been able to find anything like it. It's going on my 2011-2012 shopping list.

Edited to add: Oh, and I drink about 30 oz before I leave the house, and every 3 hours or so I stop somewhere, pee (indoors), drink about 20 oz or so more, snarf a builder bar, and run back out. I feel like crap when I dry out, which hurts my skiing, so it's worth making the occasional stop.
post #38 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post





 

 A good case of giardia will cure you of using any snow off the ground.

 I understand how that ends up in streams, but a little harder to see how it gets into snow pack, especially in winter at high altitude. I mean, animals are peeing, their waste gets into ground water, that gets into streams, right (eg, it's not just that they enjoy peeing in streams). But snow originates from above, where there are no animals. Unless some animal pees or craps directly into the bit of snow I'm picking up, don't see this risk. Am I wrong?
 

 

post #39 of 52
The snow guns spray water that is pumped from the surrounding bodies of water that have every thing that was deposited up hill in it.
post #40 of 52

Sure, but talking about places where there is no snowmaking.

post #41 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post

The snow guns spray water that is pumped from the surrounding bodies of water that have every thing that was deposited up hill in it.


Natural snowpack for the win.

 

post #42 of 52

say you were lost for a couple days in the mountains and had access to clean, natural snow. how would you melt enough to have a decent drink? you have a lighter, of course wink.gif

 

I think of the sailors who catch water in a tarp, make a channel to funnel it into a cup as it collects. could your jacket work in some way? dying of thirst sitting on 20 feet of snow seems as ironic as on the ocean.

 

sorry for the hijack. answer: depends on the exertion level and the weather, what I carry. mostly just some water in a flexible canteen.

post #43 of 52

OK so i met up with a few Bears out in Summit County last week and decided to due a very scientific evauluation of the various methods mentioned above. Sunday at Vail I wore a 2 litre camelbak pak. Although it held plenty of water, it also was too hot under my jacket, kindof uncomfortable, but i had a sip when i wanted one. Tuesday at Breck i left it in the car and had to come down from the TeeBar to the base by noon, not about to go back up that day. Wednesday at Abasin i scaped snow off my ski, sorry kneale as you were there while this was going on, but i found the snow to be a good solution as it cooled and quenched at the same time. Wednesday at Vail i carried a half Litre platty in my goggle pocket. I think this is the best solution for me, way less hassle than a camelbak as long as you take a mid day break to re-load

post #44 of 52
There's no giardia in the clouds, so fresh snow is safe. Once it's been contaminated by surface water or soil you need to stay away. I learned long ago--so it might have been wrong--that giardia cysts don't stay or aren't viable or something in water over about 50 degrees. I still filtered water in the canyons unless it was falling straight out of a spring.

As for snow, the mountaineering books I've read and the mountaineers I've known said snow needs to be melted over a stove because it takes too much time and too many calories to melt enough snow in your mouth to keep you hydrated. That's what they said--don't blame me if the physics doesn't work (and I'm sure someone here will test the assertion!).
post #45 of 52

Last few weeks -- it's been very warm here -- I've been scooping clean snow into a half-full bottle of Poweraid and letting it melt a bit in my pocket while skiing. Stretches out the volume a bit... and precludes going inside!

 

post #46 of 52

Before eating the snow keep in mind some ski areas use the treated effluent from their sewage plants for snowmaking water.eek.gif

post #47 of 52
Good point--I wasn't thinking about man-made snow. In that situation, even off-piste snow downhill from man-made would be suspect.
post #48 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by litterbug View Post

As for snow, the mountaineering books I've read and the mountaineers I've known said snow needs to be melted over a stove because it takes too much time and too many calories to melt enough snow in your mouth to keep you hydrated. That's what they said--don't blame me if the physics doesn't work (and I'm sure someone here will test the assertion!).


That's definitely true. The first thing they teach for cold weather survival is not to eat snow directly. It causes a whole bunch of problems number one being it lowers your core temp and then second that it wastes much needed calories.

 

Also to people debating about how safe snow is you should purify any water from the ground. Even snow and standing rain water. Unless you catch it falling from the sky you should purify it. At least thats the rule not saying thats what I always do

post #49 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by lonewolf210 View Post

Also to people debating about how safe snow is you should purify any water from the ground. Even snow and standing rain water. Unless you catch it falling from the sky you should purify it. At least thats the rule not saying thats what I always do

That's what I always told the park visitors. Not the last sentence, of course. But after telling some nasty giardia stories I would point out that if they're dying even contaminated water is worth it--just that they'd probably need a course of strong antibiotics afterwards.

I've probably been lucky, but I did always stay away from cold streams (and cow-infested waters, the bane of the desert West).
post #50 of 52


Quote:

Originally Posted by litterbug View Post


That's what I always told the park visitors. Not the last sentence, of course. But after telling some nasty giardia stories I would point out that if they're dying even contaminated water is worth it--just that they'd probably need a course of strong antibiotics afterwards.
 

 

That's true I would rather take the chance then die of dehydration. Then there was the time that a water source my group had to use was so bad we used pump purifiers and then boiled it and then some people added iodine for good measure. That water was straight nasty

post #51 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mdskier View Post

Before eating the snow keep in mind some ski areas use the treated effluent from their sewage plants for snowmaking water.eek.gif


If I'm skiing somewhere with manmade snow I'm just looking for an excuse to go inside for a break anyway.

 

post #52 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by prickly View Post




If I'm skiing somewhere with manmade snow I'm just looking for an excuse to go inside for a break anyway.

 



So your looking to go inside pretty much every where you ski? Almost every resorts uses some kind of man made snow during teh season

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