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What's holding you back from being a better skier ? - Page 3

post #61 of 71


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinFromSA View Post

#2 - PHYSICAL FITNESS. I am so out of shape, that I can rarely make a run from the top of the mountain to the bottom without pausing for a moment to catch my breath. Maybe it's the altitude, maybe it's tired muscles, but really, I think it's because I'm out of shape for skiing. BUT, if I had more of #1 (time), then I believe that would dramatically help out with #2. After all my trips out West this season, I feel MUCH better than I did before. My old jeans fit great again, and I have tons more energy.

 


Yeah, I'm probably quoting this one way too late (hence the right person will miss it), though I'm actually doing a course in sports physiology and just have to say that: If you have to catch your breath it's because you're out of shape and should (you really should, a healthy heart is a good thing) run intervals (since intervals is pretty much the only way to improve your heart's stroke volume which, in turn, improves your general fitness and prevents heart attacks). 4 times 4 is a good one, four minutes of running as fast as you can run four minutes, then three minutes of "active break", repeat four times. Do this twice a week and you will improve a lot.

 

If it's your muscles being tired (not you being short of breath) then it's because you don't ski enough. Best way to improve is by skiing, second best is my going to the gym and work out your legs (say four reps, four series with 90% of maximum, or something like that). Of course, stronger legs will make skiing an easier task for your muscles, thus reducing the need for oxygen and make you less short of breath. Hence just skiing will make you better, but I would add in some intervals as well.

 

Just my five cents... ;-)

post #62 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

not nice.
 



Sorry, I thought their stuff was hysterical. 

post #63 of 71

Apology accepted Phil.  Those posters are funny, but in the context you used it, it really felt like an insult to my skill (or lack thereof.)

 

 

post #64 of 71

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Christian View Post

 

Yeah, I'm probably quoting this one way too late (hence the right person will miss it), though I'm actually doing a course in sports physiology and just have to say that: If you have to catch your breath it's because you're out of shape and should (you really should, a healthy heart is a good thing) run intervals (since intervals is pretty much the only way to improve your heart's stroke volume which, in turn, improves your general fitness and prevents heart attacks). 4 times 4 is a good one, four minutes of running as fast as you can run four minutes, then three minutes of "active break", repeat four times. Do this twice a week and you will improve a lot.


Christian, when you run intervals... when you go to the highest resistance settings, how depleted should you feel? Should it seem as if you're going to collapse/die while running it? Should you feel like you're about to vomit? Or should you just feel like "wow, i'm tired" with just sweating and some panting?

post #65 of 71

Metaphor: The Norwegian thinking on this one is that you cannot train too hard (though you can get insufficient rest in between of work-outs), but you have to be able to complete what you set out to do. For 4 times 4 intervals I do 90 - 95 % of max pulse at the highest resistance (well, that's my pulse after a couple of minutes, and 70% of max pulse at the end of the break). Basically I'm very short of breath (not being able to talk, really), but not stiff and I could have forced myself to run for another minute or so. Not getting stiff is kind of important, as that would force you to stop/slow down early (and you want to train your heart, not pain tolerance towards running with acid in your muscles). Running up-hill is better, as you will reach a high pulse way faster and spend more time at the work-load that actually makes a difference.

 

At the end of the last one I don't feel like vomiting (might be individual, I don't know), though I have to sit down to catch my breath. Kind of hard to explain, just think that you want to work your heart as hard as possible, but not to a point where your muscles make you slow down (thus no acid). Hope this kind of made sense?

post #66 of 71

Christian: 

"At the end of the last one I don't feel like vomiting (might be individual, I don't know), though I have to sit down to catch my breath."

 

 

I've always found that I catch my breath more easily after going all out if I'm walking around while I'm doing it.  This sort of thing is ideal during interval training, and needs to be done after it as well.  I believe I've read that people who have heart attacks while working out, and this does happen, even when they're in good shape, have them most often when they stop to sit down or talk, but anyway stop too suddenly.  Safety first, fitness second.  When you're done working out hard, it's safer to go strraight into a cool down walk than to sit down.

post #67 of 71

Thanks Christian and Kytecin!

post #68 of 71

The biggest problem I have is over coming wind resistace agaist my pencil poles which often results in less turns then is desired.

Secound biggest problem is in understanding the precise tapestry of fibonacci relationships that would take my skiing to a higher fun level.

post #69 of 71

My biggest obstacle is doing drills.  Skiing is so much more fun.  But seriously, I took my level II this year, and while preparing for it, at first, I thought the required tasks were the most ridiculously contrived tasks anybody could come up with.  Side-cut traverse, leapers and skating - who came up with that?  But, after a while I realized that these tasks isolated critical skills, and nailing them really translated to my skiing skills.  I'm still not crazy about spending a dedicated hour doing nothing but drills, but I try to sneak in something into my general skiing, for example, 

 

Yes, I did pass the exam.

post #70 of 71

 

Congrats on making level II! I'm going to have to change my prior answer and now say that it's because I'm done for the year...icon13.gif

 

 

 

post #71 of 71

ILOJ wrote: "Now, any time I get out of my comfort zone, whether it be steeper terrain, bigger bumps, more speed, or whatever, my mind goes to remembering that pain if I fall.  Therefore, I avoid falling by skiing way to conservatively and hesitantly and only really ski 'properly' when I'm well within my comfort zone.  Being in my late 40's, I fear that injury, even minor, hurts more and lasts longer than when I was younger.  Over the past 3 years, I've been skiing about 35 days per year, and I've only fell about 2 or 3 time max per year (way too conservative).  When I've fallen, it's been no big deal, pain and injury free. But my mind still rushes to the threat of falling and  pain anytime I'm out of my comfort zone.  Do I need a ski instructor or hypnotist?"

 

Lots of fine observations. I noted a positive recommendation on another Epic thread for Mermer Blakeslee's, A Conversation with Fear. It's a fine read, for sure, and speaks directly to all the issues you've raised.

 

Good luck.

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