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Review: 2012 Blizzard Bodacious

post #1 of 37
Thread Starter 

 

Product: 2012 Blizzard Bodacious

 

Length/size Tested: 186 length, 142/118/132 shape

 

Environment of Conditions:

*Location of review: Snowbird UT

*Runs Taken: 12+

*Snow Conditions: Powder/packed powder

*Demo or Purchase: Demo

 

Summary (inc. Strengths & Weaknesses):

Thanks to Wasatchback I was able to demo a pair of 186 Bodacious yesterday at Snowbird.  I wanted to pay him back by sharing a brief review of how these things handle.  These skis completely live up to their reputation as a serious big mountain charger.

 

Strengths:

These skis really don't have a speed limit.  People toss around the term "no speed limit" way too casually and apply it to too many skis - but it's really true here.  I've never been able to ski through broken and cut up snow so fast before.  I don't know whether it's the flipcore layup or all the metal in the ski but they really do ride in an unusually smooth and calm manner I haven't experienced before.  My Volkl Katanas are known for being pretty stable in cut up snow but the Bodacious was on another level.  The funny thing is, these skis are named after famous rodeo bulls, but they ski in the exact opposite way.  They don't "buck" you around at all, they have a quiet calmness at warp speed that is really impressive and pretty unique.  They have a great feel to them that I immediately missed when I went back to my Volkls today.  

 

Weaknesses:

OK, here's the downside.  While it's amazing in open terrain, they are a handful in tight spots and bumps.  I was surprised to find it wasn't nearly as slarvy as I expected.  For example, the Volkl Katana is way more agile and manageable in tight spots mainly because of its slarviness.  The rocker on Bodacious is pretty subtle and it felt overall more like a traditional ski than I was expecting.  

 

The big turn radius means the ski takes coaxing to initiate turns.  Most of the skis I've tried lately have automatic turn initiation but this ski doesn't.  It's designed to go fast and straight so if that's what you're really looking for - here it is.  For how and where I ski I prefer something turnier and more agile.  If the narrower Cochese (which I haven't skied yet) has the same eerie calmness at speed with a more agile shape then it might fit me better.  

 

Other skis in class: Volkl Katana, Rossi Super S7, Rossi S7, K2 Obsethed, Dynastar XXL

 

 

Tester Info:

Age: 31

Height/Weight: 165

Average days on snow: 0-10, 11-25, 30+  (pick one)

Years Skiing: 0-5, 6-15, 15-30, 30+  (pick one)

 

Aggressiveness: Conservative / Moderate / Aggressive / Competitor (pick one)


Edited by Matter - 3/28/11 at 7:21am
post #2 of 37

Nice review, can yo post up dims? I know these are 118 underfoot with low rise, longer run tip/tail. 

post #3 of 37
Thread Starter 

Sorry, the dims are 142/118/132.  Its a pet peeve of mine when reviews don't give that info on new skis.  They do have long low rise but its very low, especially in the tail.  For comparison, Volkl Katana has significantly more rocker and its one of the lowest ELP rockers Volkl makes.  

post #4 of 37

Nice review.  My experiences mirrored yours. Cochise is much more of a "resort" ski (exceptional in bumps and crud), the Bodacious was great in open terrain and uncut/barely cut snow, not so hot in tracked out soft snow and bumps, as it just felt stiff and rigid in that condition, whereas the Cochise sucked it all up and was like skiing a ski with suspension; uber smooth.  At least on my feet, the Cochise would be the ski to own for an all-around soft snow ski, and the Bodacious would be the heli-skiing and super deep snow day ski.  FWIW, I found the same on my MX108 and MX128, nearly identically to how the 2 Blizzard's match up. After skiing a bunch of 120mm skis recently, I haven't found many that are versatile resort skis that can handle all types of soft snow conditions.  It is probably tough to build a ski that wide that surfs well in deep snow, is stable at speed in big arcs, and yet handles beat-up crud and soft bumps well at speed, without tossing the skier around. 

post #5 of 37

I think the Bode will appeal to the uber hard-charging, straight lining,  Mach schnell speed, big-air-stomping skier. While not a huge piece of the market, certainly a segment out there. IMHO, niether the Bode or the Chochise are powder ski's (not a substitute for a S7, Benny or DPS) but certainly have a legit use. I agree 100% about your assessment of the cochise, I loved it at Alpine Meadows but felt that it wasn't the quickest tree ski out there for sure. It would be a great ski for more open terrain, steeps and heavier snow conditions. On the feet of more accomplished skiers, it may very well be a good tighter tree ski.  What's your take on that?

post #6 of 37
Not to hijack the thread, but shouldn't the "Bode" be called the "Arne"? I have raized that point before, and I still think that the choice of the name for the top of the line ski is rather unfortunate. I don't fully appreciate the arcane trivia it is based on (sorry, not a rodeo fan) and I think it makes the impression that the ski is named for a certain accomplished US skier, while in reality the Bodaceous is a pro model of a certain other accomplished US skier, the late Arne Backstrom, who apparently helped to design the flip core series. I jsut think that the marketing department had done a pretty poor job with that one. The Bonafide and Black Pearl names hit the bullseye, and Cochise is distinctive enough and weird enough to have instant recognition. But Bodaceous is wrong on many levels....rolleyes.gif OK, End of pointless rant....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

I think the Bode will appeal ,to the uber hard-charging, straight lining,  Mach schnell speed, big-air-stomping skier. While not a huge piece of the market, certainly a segment out there. IMHO, niether the Bode or the Chochise are powder ski's (not a substitute for a S7, Benny or DPS) but certainly have a legit use. I agree 100% about your assessment of the cochise, I loved it at Alpine Meadows but felt that it wasn't the quickest tree ski out there for sure. It would be a great ski for more open terrain, steeps and heavier snow conditions. On the feet of more accomplished skiers, it may very well be a good tighter tree ski.  What's your take on that?

post #7 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
On the feet of more accomplished skiers, it may very well be a good tighter tree ski.  What's your take on that?


I find it to be a pretty damn fine tree ski, in fact that's what it does best, IMO. For my skiing, I ski my Nordica Girish when I'll be skiing open terrain/ harder snow/ higher speed, the Cochise is my go-to tree ski... I don't ski anything else except race skis, and I rarely ski those.

post #8 of 37
Thread Starter 

The Bodacious is definitely designed to be a big high speed straightline machine, not a surfy resort pow ski.  It is a TON of fun just skiing ridiculously fast all over the place.  It's so calm at speed in rough snow it makes you feel invincible.  While I understand Blizzard's decision to make this type of ski, I can't help but feel like there was an opportunity missed in the Freemountain line for another wide ski with flipcore that is 115-120 underfoot with a 26-28m radius.  

 

I skied the Cochise today for the first time (thanks again Wasatchback) and was pretty amazed.  I'll do a full review later.  I selfishly wish the Bodacious was just a wider version of the Cochise with its turn radius and slarviness.  

post #9 of 37

yeah, if anything turns on a dime in that range, it is the Cochise. Although I want to say the Olympus is a tad quicker yet, maybe it has to do with the softer tip and tight radius, but they are close.  Both are somewhat turnier than the MX108. You have to work a bit more on that ski; payback is increased stability in bigger terrain, though.

 

Unfortunately, I don't think the Bodacious will be quite a "resort" ski like the Cochise will. While I agree that the Cochise won't replace, say a Bent, S7 or similar (or, in my case, an MX128), I can see myself skiing a Cochise way more than any of those skis. It simply works better in more conditions that I am likely to encounter on any given soft snow day.  It really impressed me with it's versatility.

post #10 of 37


I will have to demo again. I skied these in Tahoe in heavier, tracked and broken snow. I did not have them in tight trees it was just my impression based on the conditions I was in. Admitedly, I am not as good of a skier as you both are but I did love them in all other conditions I was in.  Personally, I am heading towards the 98 for everyday and a ski like the DPS Rp112 for all other.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post





I find it to be a pretty damn fine tree ski, in fact that's what it does best, IMO. For my skiing, I ski my Nordica Girish when I'll be skiing open terrain/ harder snow/ higher speed, the Cochise is my go-to tree ski... I don't ski anything else except race skis, and I rarely ski those.



 



Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post

yeah, if anything turns on a dime in that range, it is the Cochise. Although I want to say the Olympus is a tad quicker yet, maybe it has to do with the softer tip and tight radius, but they are close.  Both are somewhat turnier than the MX108. You have to work a bit more on that ski; payback is increased stability in bigger terrain, though.

 

Unfortunately, I don't think the Bodacious will be quite a "resort" ski like the Cochise will. While I agree that the Cochise won't replace, say a Bent, S7 or similar (or, in my case, an MX128), I can see myself skiing a Cochise way more than any of those skis. It simply works better in more conditions that I am likely to encounter on any given soft snow day.  It really impressed me with it's versatility.



 

post #11 of 37

Can anybody compare the Bodacious to the Line Mothership as far as turniness and stability?  From the write ups, they seem to have similar strengths.

 

Looking forward to demoing the Cochise and Bodacious at Alta on the 9th.

 

Like Matter, I wonder why Blizzard doesn't see the demand for a smeary, 120mm+ underfoot, powder ski with a bit more rocker that floats easy though the deep stuff in the trees.

 

The Answer isn't quite fat enough to be called a deep days ski by today's standards and by the looks of the new Freemountain PBR Tour line, next year will be the Answers last.


Edited by altabrig - 3/30/11 at 8:56am
post #12 of 37

The Mutha is a very stable ski and initiates fairly well given its stiffness but the stiff tail does not allow it to sustain the bend and finish the turn as well as maybe it could. The most proper comparison to the M/S is the Cochise. In this comparison, the Blizzi wins on very count except for stability which I'd call a draw. As has been pointed out, the Bodacious is a real pro model ski and it should be considered as such. Powder skis such as the S7, DPS etc are not the same category of ski at all. Blizzi did not take the approach of some other companies and put an athletes name on a watered down ski. This ski is the real deal for that market segment. In the future, Blizzi will have yet another offering of flipcore skis as the One, Crush and Answer are phased out. The incoming Freemountain line has a different focus than those models.

 

Brief hijack here to talk about the Cochise and the Bone.........

 

Both of these skis are ideally suited for Western and especially Tahoe conditions when viewed through the OSQ lens. Neither is as stiff or heavy as people who haven't skied them seem to think they are, yet both are more nimble than one would expect given the metal layers and the rep for stability. IMO, in the 98mm range, the Bone pretty much stands alone. The Cochise is also right there at the top of the heap in its class but it gets some serious competition from the new LP 105. The choice between the Cochise and Bone comes down to preferences and priorities. For a skier with another ski on the wide side, or the skier who can't dart out the door every time it snows, the Bone probably gets the nod for most folks. Paired with possibly a DPS 112 RP, that would be about as good as it gets. OTH for the Tahoe OSQ, the Cochise may well be the choice assuming the skier is good enough to ski a big ski all the time. (Cochise would be a great replacement for an old Gotama for example)

 

Contrary to popular opinion........powder skiing ain't all that difficult and 98-108mm serves quite well when other conditions are also considered.

 

SJ

post #13 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post

The Mutha is a very stable ski and initiates fairly well given its stiffness but the stiff tail does not allow it to sustain the bend and finish the turn as well as maybe it could. The most proper comparison to the M/S is the Cochise. In this comparison, the Blizzi wins on very count except for stability which I'd call a draw. As has been pointed out, the Bodacious is a real pro model ski and it should be considered as such. Powder skis such as the S7, DPS etc are not the same category of ski at all. Blizzi did not take the approach of some other companies and put an athletes name on a watered down ski. This ski is the real deal for that market segment. In the future, Blizzi will have yet another offering of flipcore skis as the One, Crush and Answer are phased out. The incoming Freemountain line has a different focus than those models.

SJ



Thanks. icon14.gif

Powder is easy on fats or skinnies, but the new fat early rise/rocker shapes sure change the feeling with the enhanced float.  It will be fun to go head to head with my 195 mothers and the Bodacious, I will keep the tail stiffness and turn finish in mind. 

 

Possibly, I will demo a fat DPS or ICELANTIC if Ullr is generous.  I am not going to hold my breath.

 

So the  Bone will make a good replacement for the Atlas.  I know that  there are other Bone threads, but in line with the hijack...Does the Bone move crud with ease like the Atlas?

 

The Blizzi Freemountain market will not cater to the soft ski rocker surfers and focus on big line chargers, or will it branch out in 2012-2013???

 

 

post #14 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by altabrig View Post

Can anybody compare the Bodacious to the Line Mothership as far as turniness and stability?  From the write ups, they seem to have similar strengths.

 

Looking forward to demoing the Cochise and Bodacious at Alta on the 9th.

 

Like Matter, I wonder why Blizzard doesn't see the demand for a smeary, 120mm+ underfoot, powder ski with a bit more rocker that floats easy though the deep stuff in the trees.

 

The Answer isn't quite fat enough to be called a deep days ski by today's standards and by the looks of the new Freemountain PBR Tour line, next year will be the Answers last.


Let's just say it's coming....

In my experience the Bodacious is so different than 98% of what's out there that it takes a little bit to get used to... I got to ski the 196 only three times before my accident. The first time I took it out I was expecting to get my but kicked as there wasn't much snow at my house. However it had snowed about 16" at the top of The Canyons and I did about four to five laps off the top if 9990 in some relatively untracked pow. I have never had that much fun in powder on a pair of skis in my life. I literally could not go fast enough. It was crazy. I would get down to the bottom of the bowl and had the biggest smile on my face. If you know the canyons you have to ski some low angle trees to get to the bottom of 9990 and they were very easy to maneuver however there was a fair amount of snow. The second time I skied them was a cat skiing day at Powder Mountain. It hadn't snowed in almost two weeks so we were struggling to find any soft snow. The north facing trees in some sections were still pretty good but it was all pretty low angle. There were a bunch of us trading out between Bodacious, Bonafide, Cochises so I only got to take one run on the 196 Bodacious. The first few turns I felt like I was having to manhandle the skis to get them though the low angle trees but once I changed my balance point one ski they were a blast. They were super surfy and easy to pivot even at slow speeds. This was the first powder ski I've ever been on where I needed to lean forward. Usually you're used to sitting back and juicing the tails to get the skis to ski better in powder but once I leaned forward I got the rocker in the tail to engage and the skis were really easy to pivot. The mounting point on these is a little more traditional than some so there tends to be a little bit more tip. Because of this you can lean forward without the tips sinking...

For those that love the S7 you might not like the Bodacious. But if you're a good skier and enjoys going fast and having someting on your feet that's not going to limit your abilities then the Bodacious would be the ski for you. It's not an everyday ski like like the S7 can be for some people but if you already have a 100-110 wasted ski that you lime to ski all over the mountain and want something bigger for big days then the Bodacious would bea great option. Especially for those guys in Cali and the NW where the snow tends to be a little heavier. Personally I don't think that they're hard to ski at slow speeds if you're balanced correctly. Sit back and they might mess with you a bit but kerp that pressure on the tongues of your boot like you would on hardpack and these skis really come alive. I might mess with the mounting point on a couple of the skis to see if a little forward mount makes the tails a little easier to skid and smear... We'll see
post #15 of 37
  if you already have a 100-110 wasted ski that you lime to ski all over the mountain and want something bigger for big days then the Bodacious would bea great option. Especially for those guys in Cali and the NW where the snow tends to be a little heavier. Personally I don't think that they're hard to ski at slow speeds if you're balanced correctly. Sit back and they might mess with you a bit but kerp that pressure on the tongues of your boot like you would on hardpack and these skis really come alive. I might mess with the mounting point on a couple of the skis to see if a little forward mount makes the tails a little easier to skid and smear... We'll see



That sounds like a great sell for the Bodacious.   But now I want to know what is "coming" as far as fatter more rockered ski from Blizzi, if it is.  Looking forward to testing the new skis.

Thanks.

 

post #16 of 37
Thread Starter 

I was going to put this in my Cochise review but it might make more sense to put it here.  Something important I discovered with the Cochise is even though it is only 108 underfoot it floats like a bigger ski.  I think the flipcore layup means the ski (and tips especially) isn't bouncing and rebounding around at the end of the turn which typically leads to sinking in powder.  That porpoising effect is gone so you ride higher in the snow despite a narrower width.  I swiped these pics from Snowbirds photo sales site.  This is my demo on the Cochise on Tuesday - check out how high I'm riding in the snow on the 185. 

 

S_JD_101_124_9827.jpg

 

S_JD_101_124_9828.jpg

S_JD_101_124_9829.jpg

S_JD_101_124_9830.jpg

S_JD_101_124_9831.jpg

S_JD_101_124_9832.jpg

 

 

post #17 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post

The Mutha is a very stable ski and initiates fairly well given its stiffness but the stiff tail does not allow it to sustain the bend and finish the turn as well as maybe it could. The most proper comparison to the M/S is the Cochise. In this comparison, the Blizzi wins on very count except for stability which I'd call a draw. As has been pointed out, the Bodacious is a real pro model ski and it should be considered as such. Powder skis such as the S7, DPS etc are not the same category of ski at all. Blizzi did not take the approach of some other companies and put an athletes name on a watered down ski. This ski is the real deal for that market segment. In the future, Blizzi will have yet another offering of flipcore skis as the One, Crush and Answer are phased out. The incoming Freemountain line has a different focus than those models.

 

Brief hijack here to talk about the Cochise and the Bone.........

 

Both of these skis are ideally suited for Western and especially Tahoe conditions when viewed through the OSQ lens. Neither is as stiff or heavy as people who haven't skied them seem to think they are, yet both are more nimble than one would expect given the metal layers and the rep for stability. IMO, in the 98mm range, the Bone pretty much stands alone. The Cochise is also right there at the top of the heap in its class but it gets some serious competition from the new LP 105. The choice between the Cochise and Bone comes down to preferences and priorities. For a skier with another ski on the wide side, or the skier who can't dart out the door every time it snows, the Bone probably gets the nod for most folks. Paired with possibly a DPS 112 RP, that would be about as good as it gets. OTH for the Tahoe OSQ, the Cochise may well be the choice assuming the skier is good enough to ski a big ski all the time. (Cochise would be a great replacement for an old Gotama for example)

 

Contrary to popular opinion........powder skiing ain't all that difficult and 98-108mm serves quite well when other conditions are also considered.

 

SJ


That is exactly what I plan on...with the addition of a MX88 for the really hard days. IMHO, The Bonafide is the best 98mm ski out there, I have had it in firm snow, bumps and 3' of powder, the ski performs remarkably well in all aspects. As far as the comparison to the Atlas, the Atlas is not in the class of the Bonni, but I was never a fan of the IQ-Max Titan series to begin with. But lets take the Bonifide talk over to the Bonafide thread. And Let the Bodacious have the glory over here. 

 

post #18 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

That is exactly what I plan on...with the addition of a MX88 for the really hard days. IMHO, The Bonafide is the best 98mm ski out there, I have had it in firm snow, bumps and 3' of powder, the ski performs remarkably well in all aspects. 

Same thinking here, having been on both skis I think that a combination of a Bonafide for everyday and DPS112 for powder will be a great 2-ski quiver that will also satisfy an surprisingly wide range of skills.  This is what I'd love to have next year.  I have not been on the Cochise, but the Dynastar LP105 is also a great Tahoe OSQ.   Really hard days: who cares.. I can scratch away on my (future) Bonafides.  Contrary to the popular opinion, I tend to build my quivers with skis with wide performance envelopes, just because conditions in Tahoe change so much throughout the day.  

 

Just to express a personal opinion: I am so impressed with rockered skis this year, I think this technology has finally matured and manufacturers learned to deliver great benefits to the skier without much adverse effects, and as a consequence these skis started to have a very large performance envelope.
 

 

 

post #19 of 37

Matter- nice turns....!

post #20 of 37


Sorry, but i have already claimed this combo.... for a small fee, i will sell you a permit.......biggrin.gif
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post



Same thinking here, having been on both skis I think that a combination of a Bonafide for everyday and DPS112 for powder will be a great 2-ski quiver that will also satisfy an surprisingly wide range of skills.  This is what I'd love to have next year.  I have not been on the Cochise, but the Dynastar LP105 is also a great Tahoe OSQ.   Really hard days: who cares.. I can scratch away on my (future) Bonafides.  Contrary to the popular opinion, I tend to build my quivers with skis with wide performance envelopes, just because conditions in Tahoe change so much throughout the day.  

 

Just to express a personal opinion: I am so impressed with rockered skis this year, I think this technology has finally matured and manufacturers learned to deliver great benefits to the skier without much adverse effects, and as a consequence these skis started to have a very large performance envelope.
 

 

 



 

post #21 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post


Sorry, but i have already claimed this combo.... for a small fee, i will sell you a permit.......biggrin.gif
 



 


Fee.......???..............Wade-A-Minitheah.

 

Howzabout we just refer to this as the FDQ........as an acknowledgment of your visionary status of course.

 

SJ

 

post #22 of 37



TOO KIND.... But I need some way to afford to keep this insane ski-purchasing-lifestyle.......  I like the FDQ  thing,,,,,biggrin.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post




Fee.......???..............Wade-A-Minitheah.

 

Howzabout we just refer to this as the FDQ........as an acknowledgment of your visionary status of course.

 

SJ

 



 

post #23 of 37

For the uninitiated, what is FDQ?  I of course googled it, but the few top hits that I saw were: "Fashion Doll Quarterly" and "Frankenstein Drag Queens"...  Probably not what you meant...

 

 Finndog- I may get you a fee but only after you get some fee from Philpug, who I believe is going for the same quiver...  Good luck...  

 

P.S. The real debts go to SJ and Phil who put me on both skis, so give credit where credit is duewink.gif.  
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post



TOO KIND.... But I need some way to afford to keep this insane ski-purchasing-lifestyle.......  I like the FDQ  thing,,,,,biggrin.gif



 



 

post #24 of 37

I am assuming it means FinnDog Quiver....

 

OK, that does it, that means that Phil owes mea fee as well......  I may be able to afford both of these yet! biggrin.gif

post #25 of 37

I owe..I owe...Off to ski I go...

post #26 of 37

^^^^    What a tough life, eh Phil?

I would like to try the Dstar LP105....bet it would be a great 1SQ for Tahoe, and as such I won't need the Bonafide, even tho Phil won't talk to me again.jk.gif

 

Yaga!

 

 

post #27 of 37


You are right, 105 will be a great Tahoe OSQ especially for a charger, but believe me, you need a Bonafide regardless, (and I have been on both skis) biggrin.gif.    

Quote:
Originally Posted by nfp158 View Post

^^^^    What a tough life, eh Phil?

I would like to try the Dstar LP105....bet it would be a great 1SQ for Tahoe, and as such I won't need the Bonafide, even tho Phil won't talk to me again.jk.gif

 

Yaga!

 

 



 

post #28 of 37


Too many TLA's on Epic latelyhopmad.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

I am assuming it means FinnDog Quiver....

 

OK, that does it, that means that Phil owes mea fee as well......  I may be able to afford both of these yet! biggrin.gif



 

post #29 of 37

Alex, nice use, TLA.  Its more of our secret language here, The more TLA's you  use/understand the more core you are    (you know we are just joking about all this, right?)  biggrin.gif

 

Looks like I'm SOL.......wink.gif

 

 

post #30 of 37

Alta Demo Day 4/9.

 

Skis Tested

185 Cochise

186 Bodacious

189 Iceatlantic Shaman

 

40 years old

6'1"

215 Lb

35 years skiing

 

I skied the Bodacious for 3 runs through trees in the Wildcat area tree and glade (which were getting tracked out quickly) and one run down Stonecrusher.  I was suprised by the Bodacious' quickness and power.  The Bodacious is easy to turn and powerful at pushing heaps of crud out of the way in wetter than avg. Utah snow.   They seemed very light after being on my 195 Motherships for the week prior, yet still very powerful, easy to finish up the turn, and very stable at speed.    I am sure the CochiseI tested would be great fun in the trees with less snow depth, but I found the Bodacious in the 186 length to be quick and fun in the trees and still long enough to be stable at speed for my weight.  If I didn't have the moships I would get the longer Bodacious, but I am seriously considering the186  Bodacious for a Pow/Tree/Crud ski.  It had more float and was less work in the trees than my moships and more powerful and more float than the Cochise.  But I may be still too close to the Moships for a good pow crud ski.    If these were around when I bought the moships, I would have gone Bodacious. 

 

In short, the 186 length Bodacious is a powerful powder blaster that turns on a dime has a real pop coming out of a turn as it makes mincemeat of crud.  I would like to ski them again.   They are really good.

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