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ski pulling into turn

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Hi,

Question for the technically-minded: Can I increase my skis' desire to pull into a turn by some form of tuning?  Or is it an immutable element of the skis? 

 

Background: while I was in Utah, I demoed some Blizzard Magnum 8.1's.  I really liked them -- most particularly because the tips seemed to almost suck me into the turn the minute I initiated.  Now that I've been home on my Dynastar 4x4's I find this lacking.  I like the Dynastars' general dampness and carvability, and overall I'd say they're "quick", but there seems to be a second's hesitation before they want to move into the turn.  I had always felt a bit ambivalent about some element of these skis, and now I think I know what it is. 

 

So.... the question: can I improve my 4x4's in terms of this one element?  Will tuning them sharp all the way to the tip help?  Detuning them?  Any other suggestions?  I would try some technique adjustment, but common sense says that I was skiing the Blizzards the same way I ski at home.

 

 

post #2 of 8

Yes tune can make a BIG difference, if you go with less base bevel it will initiate faster... but I'll bet the binding is playing a roll here as well. The Marker binding on the 8.1 is pretty 'flat' the look on the 4x4 is very ramped, this will make pressure on the ski's shovel harder to achieve. Try 'gas pedaling' the Look binding, if you can.

post #3 of 8

Move your binding mount position forward 5-10mm at a time until you get the "feeling" you're looking for.

post #4 of 8

I dont know if the manufactures are still recomending the binding positions further back then is ideal far carving so the masses can skid the new shaped skis easier then carve. Ball of foot ( behind big toe) should be in center of running surface of the ski.

post #5 of 8

I guess I kind of assumed that the tch's Contact 4x4 has the Fluid bindings.  Those binding can have their position easily be adjusted without much fuss.

post #6 of 8

If the delta angle sometimes known as the ramp angle is differnt between the 2 skis it coould maybe make the difference you notice. If the binding of one ski causes the heal of the boot to sit a lot higher then the toe it could cause more weight in the back seat resulting in slower turn initiation.. Weight forward quiker turn initiatiion. (more weight @ back of ski near end of turn will accelerate end of turn) Wider tip can also cause quiker turn initiation as well as lighter poles (hold any amount of weight in front of your body & to counter balance the body must lean back in porportion to the weight being held)

post #7 of 8

Snow conditions make a differnce also i.e., sinking  several inches into corn will cause a ski to bend more @ the tip. More force is exerted on the tip of the ski as it plows through the heavier snow.

post #8 of 8

     Quote:

Originally Posted by Powder Jet View Post

If the delta angle sometimes known as the ramp angle is differnt between the 2 skis it coould maybe make the difference you notice. If the binding of one ski causes the heal of the boot to sit a lot higher then the toe it could cause more weight in the back seat resulting in slower turn initiation.. Weight forward quiker turn initiatiion. (more weight @ back of ski near end of turn will accelerate end of turn) Wider tip can also cause quiker turn initiation as well as lighter poles (hold any amount of weight in front of your body & to counter balance the body must lean back in porportion to the weight being held)


All very true, but binding delta is tougher to change (typically done with shims under the binding or boot sole plating) whereas binding position can usually be more easily adjusted.

 

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