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help me make a big choice

post #1 of 86
Thread Starter 

I cross posted this in the resorts forum also.

 

 

I have the great fortune of having to make a rather big but exciting decision.  I have the luck to be able to live anywhere I want with no obligations what so ever to work or earn a living and with great financial freedom.  I am an an expert plus skier with lots of big mountain experience but for the last 20 years have had to live by small mountains that were fun for a few hours a day but offered little challenge (Mt Hood Meadows, Ski Santa Fe and Wolf Creek).  That was the price I paid for the freedom I have now.  But now I want to live by a big mountain.  The caveat is that I also want to live in a more or less real town (not just a tourist resort) that is not too small (5000+ people) and not too big (no more than 50,000), has some real culture and diversity, has great biking in the summer (both road and mountain) and where it is possible to buy a house with land (at least 5 acres) within 30 minutes or so of the mountain (on a powder day) for under $2m.  Oh and a college nearby would be good too.  Oh and in the US only, not prepared to move to Canada at this point.

 

Choices on the list include:

 

Durango Colorado -

pluses: great town with college

minuses: mediocre mountain close by (sorry Purg fans), but Silverton and Telluride not that far away

I've been to Durango often and skied Purgatory, Telluride and SIlverton

 

Park City Utah area - 

pluses: multiple great mountains, Salt Lake city close by with colleges, airports, etc.

minuses: ???

I went to college in Salt Lake City and have skied Deer Valley, Park City and Canyons (and most all other Utah areas).  Never spent much time in Park City the town though.

 

Jackson Wyoming area - 

pluses: great mountain

minuses: pretty isolated, no college really close by, questions about culture (too many super rich?)

Never been to Jackson nor skied there.

 

Bozeman Montana area -

pluses: great mountains close by (Bridger, Big Sky), good college, large enough population for diversity and some culture

minuses: ???

Never been to Bozeman nor have I skied Bridger or Big Sky.

 

Ketchum Idaho area -

pluses: great mountain in many ways

minuses: but sometimes snow challenged and not really an "extreme" mountain, pretty isolated

Been to Ketchum/Sun Valley many times in summer and winter and have skied there.

 

Cour D'Alene/Sandpoint Idaho area -

pluses: very good mountain (Schweitzer)

minuses: ???

Never been or skied there.

 

Steamboat Springs Colorado area -

pluses: nice mountain

minuses: beetle kill, isolated

Been to Steamboat in summer before beetle plague, never skied there.

 

Telluride is probably too small and isolated, same for Crested Butte.  Summit County Colorado is out, been there, don't like it.  Vail Valley is out.  Not a real town, too close to Denver, etc.  Tahoe is pretty much out because I don't want to live in California again.  Whitefish MT (Big Mountain) is too isolated.  Ogden a possibility with Snowbasin. 

 

So community give me your thoughts, insights and info to help me make this decision.  Especially interested in Bozeman/Bridger insight since it is high on the list.

 

--BlueDevil63

post #2 of 86

A very refined question.  You've already done a pretty good analysis of the candidates.  Ogden would get you a lot for your money and close to mucho skiing as you already know.  Whitefish might be worth another look.  You know NM, so I guess you've ruled out Taos?  Since you have $2m a modest place in Aspen would be within reach:-)  Great ski mtns there and fair amount of culture for a small town.

If you search here for threads like best place to live/move/retire it should kick up a lot of discussions on this topic including mundane things like health care, employment, cost of living, taxes, etc.  Check out the list of wikis, the ones about college&skiing might also give you some ideas.

 

post #3 of 86

On Whitefish, I was wondering about what aspect of "isolated" was an issue?  It's not like we don't have the dreaded box stores down in Kalispell, there's an extremely nice airport just minutes away, and both Bigfork and Whitefish have theaters in the summer.  Do you NEED an interstate?  I personally have 5 acres, live all of 16 minutes from the resort, about the same from town and our property appraisal when we refinanced was....WAY under $1million, let alone 2. 

 

As mountains go, we're no Jackson, but then the touron/local ratio is much better as well. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post

A very refined question.  You've already done a pretty good analysis of the candidates.  Ogden would get you a lot for your money and close to mucho skiing as you already know.  Whitefish might be worth another look.  You know NM, so I guess you've ruled out Taos?  Since you have $2m a modest place in Aspen would be within reach:-)  Great ski mtns there and fair amount of culture for a small town.

If you search here for threads like best place to live/move/retire it should kick up a lot of discussions on this topic including mundane things like health care, employment, cost of living, taxes, etc.  Check out the list of wikis, the ones about college&skiing might also give you some ideas.

 



 

post #4 of 86
Thread Starter 

Nothing horribly negative about Whitefish.  I personally could probably deal with it fine but I have a wife and she did not take a great liking to Whitefish.  It felt very isolated to her, she's checked the stats and it doesn't have enough sunshine for her and we had the unpleasant experience of meeting someone who had been mauled by grizzly and too many locals telling us the mountain lions would come take our dogs if we let them out at night.  Let's just say none of that pleased the wife.  Plus quite frankly we want to get just a little bit further away from the hunting culture that we currently live in and Whitefish appeared to have a very strong hunting culture (heads on the wall of every house we looked at).  I mean no offense and everyone should live whatever lifestyle and culture they want but Whitefish just didn't feel like a good fit.

 

post #5 of 86

Admittedly, if you crave sunshine, it's not the place for you. And, admittedly, our huskies are protected from mauling because we don't let them run loose, they have a nice big yard (gotta do something with the 5 acres). They have a secure (lidded) poo area they can come and go to whenever they want. And admittedly there is a HUGE hunting culture that I have had a huge time adjusting to -- I still don't want anyone hunting "our" deer, although I wish they'd go after the ones always running in front of our cars (two collisions since coming here). I'm no vegan and will happily eat the results of others' hunting, I just don't understand the attraction it holds for them. As for grizzlies, I know someone who was mauled out by Yakima, WA. I think the locals here probably enjoyed scaring her, it's sort of a local sport. I've only seen (from a great distance) two grizzlies since we moved here and that was in Glacier National Park. On the other hand, we've had black bears, elk, whitetail, foxes, and a moose right on my lawn. But, there is a huge history of people not being able to adapt here. (I rarely announce I'm a Democrat, for instance.... It's like a mortal sin...) I've learned to listen and keep my mouth shut. The one thing that does "set me off" is someone making a big f-ing deal about being a "native", especially if they don't belong to a TRIBE. That just says that their grandpa was smart, and THEY were just LUCKY. It's become my standard reply to the steadily diminishing percentage of people who trot that out.

 

I've re-looked at your list and am wondering what "real town" in the Rockies is NOT going to have a hunting culture????  Maybe you should move to Massachusetts....

post #6 of 86

I'd be tempted to look at Ogden, Utah, as Jamesj says. Since Vail is too close to Denver, you might find Ogden is too close to Salt Lake City.

 

I don't know how old you are or how long you plan to keep skiing, but, in the long term, altitude may become very important to the viability of ski areas.

 

For example, Sandpoint is a nice community and Schweitzer is a nice hill (although not what I would call extreme). But...it already rains too often at Schweitzer, as it does at the lower-altitude areas in southern British Columbia. Red Mountain in Rossland, BC suffers from hard, re-frozen snow more often than they would like to admit. At the rate things are going, these areas could be having trouble maintaining a decent snow pack in 20 years.

 

On the other hand, if you're really that well off, Sandpoint puts you within shouting distance of the cat and heliski operations in British Columbia, which are arguably among the finest skiing experiences anywhere on the planet.

 

Colorado, for all its shortcomings, very rarely suffers from rain during the winter. It can get quite warm, but if it's going to precipitate, the temperature drops. This will start to change, but it will be worse at lower elevations. Utah also has elevation on its side.

 

I would not consider Ketchum/Sun Valley. Sun Valley is well named and doesn't get the snow that many other areas get. What's a ski area without snow? It also has a high glitz factor.

 

Steamboat is also a very nice, but its altitude is low for Colorado, and it loses its snow earlier in the spring than most other Colorado areas. And you're right - beetle kill is taking out every pine tree in the state. On my last trip over Rabbit Ears pass, it was covered by a red/brown forest. Almost nothing left.

 

Jackson Hole has very serious skiing, despite the glitz factor. JH is the Real Deal. If it's isolated, well, that's what they make airplanes for, although I don't know how good the airport at Jackson is. Do you want to go to college or do you want to go skiing?

 

We're all swallowing the bait that you're some super-expert who has won the lottery or something because it's fun to dream. If it's really true, you'll burn some time over the next year trying various places on for size because you can afford it. That's the only way you'll get a real idea of how well a place fits, and it wouldn't be too smart to just up and spend $2M to move somewhere that you're not already pretty familiar with.

post #7 of 86

He's made it sound like they've BEEN to Whitefish.  I came and fell in love with the town and bought property that same year without ever skiing here until two years later.  On the other hand, as my Facebook says, "I'm strictly a winter person."  I HATE hot weather, HATE IT HATE IT.  "Hot" to me is anything over 80.  My "system" starts shutting down and I would love to just hibernate through those days.  So, if the wife likes heat and requires sunny days, this is NOT the place for her.  My family claims I have "reverse" Seasonal Affective Disorder....

post #8 of 86



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

 

I've re-looked at your list and am wondering what "real town" in the Rockies is NOT going to have a hunting culture????  Maybe you should move to Massachusetts....



How true. Idaho panhandle, Steamboat, Jackson, Bozeman - the pickups have gun racks. What? You don't have a pickup?? Yer drivin' one o' them Bee-Em-Dubyahs? American not good enough? You ain't from 'roun' heah, are ya, boy?

 

Be aware that many Real Skiers (lift and cat mechanics, cat drivers, patrol, etc.) everywhere make their living in the trades - and many of them hunt. And many ski areas are near small Western towns. Towns full of hunters and carpenters and equipment operators. Can you live with that?

 

post #9 of 86
Jackson or Bozeman. You'll get a lot more for your money in Bozeman.

But what about Glenwood Springs?

Mike
post #10 of 86

A place where the beer flows like wine... Aspen.

post #11 of 86
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Admittedly, if you crave sunshine, it's not the place for you. And, admittedly, our huskies are protected from mauling because we don't let them run loose, they have a nice big yard (gotta do something with the 5 acres). They have a secure (lidded) poo area they can come and go to whenever they want. And admittedly there is a HUGE hunting culture that I have had a huge time adjusting to -- I still don't want anyone hunting "our" deer, although I wish they'd go after the ones always running in front of our cars (two collisions since coming here). I'm no vegan and will happily eat the results of others' hunting, I just don't understand the attraction it holds for them. As for grizzlies, I know someone who was mauled out by Yakima, WA. I think the locals here probably enjoyed scaring her, it's sort of a local sport. I've only seen (from a great distance) two grizzlies since we moved here and that was in Glacier National Park. On the other hand, we've had black bears, elk, whitetail, foxes, and a moose right on my lawn. But, there is a huge history of people not being able to adapt here. (I rarely announce I'm a Democrat, for instance.... It's like a mortal sin...) I've learned to listen and keep my mouth shut. The one thing that does "set me off" is someone making a big f-ing deal about being a "native", especially if they don't belong to a TRIBE. That just says that their grandpa was smart, and THEY were just LUCKY. It's become my standard reply to the steadily diminishing percentage of people who trot that out.

 

I've re-looked at your list and am wondering what "real town" in the Rockies is NOT going to have a hunting culture????  Maybe you should move to Massachusetts....

 

Well Durango doesn't, not really.  I expect Jackson must to some extent.  Park City really doesn't, not so you would really notice.  Ketchum doesn't really either.  I expect Sandpoint/Cour D'Alene probably does to some extent.  And I would expect Bozeman to be large enough to not have it dominate things.  At least those were my thoughts.

 

 

 

post #12 of 86
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

He's made it sound like they've BEEN to Whitefish.  I came and fell in love with the town and bought property that same year without ever skiing here until two years later.  On the other hand, as my Facebook says, "I'm strictly a winter person."  I HATE hot weather, HATE IT HATE IT.  "Hot" to me is anything over 80.  My "system" starts shutting down and I would love to just hibernate through those days.  So, if the wife likes heat and requires sunny days, this is NOT the place for her.  My family claims I have "reverse" Seasonal Affective Disorder....


I have been to Whitefish.  I interviewed for a job at Positive Systems (now defunct) quite a few years ago and visited Whitefish.  Looked at houses and everything.

 

post #13 of 86
Thread Starter 

I've lived in Pagosa Springs CO for years now.  You can't get more real than that. Hunting is one of THE major elements of the economy here.  I don't hate hunting and I drive an F250 diesel and have lots of guns.  But I get tired of hunters on my property all the time, tired of being warned not to go hiking/biking/horse riding in the NF during hunting season because I will be shot by accident, etc.  So I just want something a little more balanced, where hunting is not the major thing.  So I understand that most of the places I am interested in will have some hunting culture, I just don't want it to dominate.  I just mentioned it as an issue with Whitefish because it seemed SUPER dominant there.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley View Post



 



How true. Idaho panhandle, Steamboat, Jackson, Bozeman - the pickups have gun racks. What? You don't have a pickup?? Yer drivin' one o' them Bee-Em-Dubyahs? American not good enough? You ain't from 'roun' heah, are ya, boy?

 

Be aware that many Real Skiers (lift and cat mechanics, cat drivers, patrol, etc.) everywhere make their living in the trades - and many of them hunt. And many ski areas are near small Western towns. Towns full of hunters and carpenters and equipment operators. Can you live with that?

 



 

post #14 of 86

I've daydreamed about this a lot myself.  For my money, I'd choose Bozeman (nice town, nice people) or someplace Utah.  I haven't actually been to Odgen, so that might be an option, but I spent some time in the neighborhoods of downtown SLC, and I don't think they're all that bad.  The totality is pretty big-city-ish for me, but it would be different than, say, Bozeman in that there's easy access to a fair bit of culture and some nice in-town houses.  But.. you have to look past the LDS presence unless you swing that way.  No way I'd live in Park City.  I was there this year and wow, has it changed.  Lots of rich tourons and seasonal locals and too many t-shirt shops.  I don't want to be retro-grumpy, but I liked it better before Deer Valley became the designated #1 resort in the land.

post #15 of 86

Sounds like Jackson or Bozeman are what you are looking for.  I think you should get out and check out the scene at both places.  Bozeman has a college and I never have thought of Jackson as "Glitzy".  You need to see what you think.

post #16 of 86
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley View Post

I'd be tempted to look at Ogden, Utah, as Jamesj says. Since Vail is too close to Denver, you might find Ogden is too close to Salt Lake City.

 

I don't know how old you are or how long you plan to keep skiing, but, in the long term, altitude may become very important to the viability of ski areas.

 

For example, Sandpoint is a nice community and Schweitzer is a nice hill (although not what I would call extreme). But...it already rains too often at Schweitzer, as it does at the lower-altitude areas in southern British Columbia. Red Mountain in Rossland, BC suffers from hard, re-frozen snow more often than they would like to admit. At the rate things are going, these areas could be having trouble maintaining a decent snow pack in 20 years.

 

On the other hand, if you're really that well off, Sandpoint puts you within shouting distance of the cat and heliski operations in British Columbia, which are arguably among the finest skiing experiences anywhere on the planet.

 

Colorado, for all its shortcomings, very rarely suffers from rain during the winter. It can get quite warm, but if it's going to precipitate, the temperature drops. This will start to change, but it will be worse at lower elevations. Utah also has elevation on its side.

 

I would not consider Ketchum/Sun Valley. Sun Valley is well named and doesn't get the snow that many other areas get. What's a ski area without snow? It also has a high glitz factor.

 

Steamboat is also a very nice, but its altitude is low for Colorado, and it loses its snow earlier in the spring than most other Colorado areas. And you're right - beetle kill is taking out every pine tree in the state. On my last trip over Rabbit Ears pass, it was covered by a red/brown forest. Almost nothing left.

 

Jackson Hole has very serious skiing, despite the glitz factor. JH is the Real Deal. If it's isolated, well, that's what they make airplanes for, although I don't know how good the airport at Jackson is. Do you want to go to college or do you want to go skiing?

 

We're all swallowing the bait that you're some super-expert who has won the lottery or something because it's fun to dream. If it's really true, you'll burn some time over the next year trying various places on for size because you can afford it. That's the only way you'll get a real idea of how well a place fits, and it wouldn't be too smart to just up and spend $2M to move somewhere that you're not already pretty familiar with.


Yes Park City has the positives and negative of being close to Salt Lake City but SLC is NOT Denver.  I lived in Salt Lake City for quite awhile.  I am 48 in excellent health and have lived at over 7000 ft for about 20 years now so altitude shouldn't be an issue for quite a while.

 

Am I a super expert?  I think so and others tell me so.  I can ski just about anything in any conditions.   I don't huck off big cliffs or anything but steepness and deepness are never an issue.  I grew up skiing in Idaho (Bogus Basin and Sun Valley) and raced all through high school with some success.  I put in multiple 100 day seasons.  I went to college for 6 years in Salt Lake City and skied every line at Alta, Snowbird, Solitude, Brighton and Canyons. I put in at least 30 days a year all through college.   I've skied Squaw, Bachelor, Telluride, Crested Butte, Breckenridge, Vail, Beaver Creek, Winter Park, Silverton Mt and others and have never really met anything at any of those mountains I couldn't handle.  I am getting older but changes in ski technology have allowed me to maintain my performance level even if my overall physical condition has deteriorated a bit.  I had a season pass and put in over 20 days every year for the last 20 years at either Ski Santa Fe or Wolf Creek, plus taking serious ski trips each year, usually in Colorado or Utah.  I ended up in Santa Fe for business reasons and am now retired after selling my business.  So I can live anywhere and I want to get back to big mountain skiing most of all.  And we are going to visit all the places mentioned over the next year.  I just thought this forum might be a good place to gather first hand opinions.

 

post #17 of 86

Since you lead in with skiing and things like "expert" and "big mountain," it should be fairly easy to eliminate some options. Forget Steamboat if you're looking for really challenging skiing. It's a great mountain with great snow, don't get me wrong, but probably the flattest big resort in Colorado.

 

Since you're admittedly not excited about Purgatory, I'd eliminate Durango too. That doesn't seem like the being-close-to-a-big-mountain experience you're looking for. Why move just so that you have to make longer trips to Silverton/Telluride all the time. Can't you do that now?

 

I don't know much about Idaho, but I've never thought of those resorts as that challenging or steep either.

 

For my money, I'd hone in on Jackson, Bozeman and Utah. Don't know much about the first two, but here's my two cents on Utah:

 

Personally, I'd skip Park City--too cramped and touristy for my taste and the skiing isn't as good as the rest of Utah. I never really thought of it as a place to get a lot of land, either, but never looked too close. If you like Utah, there are a ton of genuine towns between Salt Lake and Ogden that would put you closer to the airport, colleges, etc. while still being within close proximity to multiple resorts. Off the top of my head, I'm thinking Cottonwood Heights, Layton, Sandy, Midvale...

 

Eden or Huntsville are other Utah options i'd put on your radar. Really scenic towns with plenty of land all around; 10 minutes to Powder and Snowbasin. They're smaller than what you're looking for, but within 10-15 minutes you could be in Ogden where there's a college and a small city. With the type of budget you're talking, you could get a really nice place with some incredible, panoramic views--not sure how much that matters, but it's something that would win me over.

post #18 of 86

Aspen

Jackson

North Shore Lake Tahoe

Crested Butte

Telluride

Bozeman

Huntsville/Eden

 

post #19 of 86

It is my impression that there's little chance of getting 5 acres for under $2 million in the Roaring Fork Valleyt (Aspen) or Jackson Hole.  You can buy a nice place for that change with a smaller lot  To get 5 acres and a house in the Jackson area, I'll bet you have to go down to Alpine, which will give you a 30+ mile drive back to Teton Village.  It is quite a different environment in the Star Valley than up their in the vaulted heights of Jackson...

 

Mike

post #20 of 86

I'm not so sure about real estate prices right now.  They are dropping fast.  We have friends who have been trying to sell their horse property for quite some time now.  I think it's been well over a year.  It might be close to the $2 million mark.  I don't think you would need to go all the way to Alpine.  I am also confused about the comments about "vaulted heights" and glitz when talking about Jackson.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post

It is my impression that there's little chance of getting 5 acres for under $2 million in the Roaring Fork Valleyt (Aspen) or Jackson Hole.  You can buy a nice place for that change with a smaller lot  To get 5 acres and a house in the Jackson area, I'll bet you have to go down to Alpine, which will give you a 30+ mile drive back to Teton Village.  It is quite a different environment in the Star Valley than up their in the vaulted heights of Jackson...

 

Mike



 

post #21 of 86

I would take the downturn in property values as a chance to live close in (to a great resort), where property development opportunities are, and always will be, limited by number of build-able lots, and therefore of some value.

post #22 of 86

THREAD HIJACK ALERT!  (perhaps this should be a new topic): 

BlueDevil63 brings up an idea that's been percolating for a bit: with the advancement in ski technology and associated technique, is it possible that we might have reached a definite limit in how hard or big skiing is going to get?  The OP says he wants "big mountain" challenge, and that he's a super-expert (which I am not doubting).  But I'm thinking about comments re. Steamboat, Aspen, Schweitzer, Whitefish, Sun Valley, Purgatory, etc.  Those are all mountains that have been diminished by advances in technique so that they ski either small or flat.  Fifteen years ago, their challenge would have likely been adequate to long-term exploration and skiing.  Now, in an era when you can schmear/carve 5 huge rips in 1,000 vertical feet, they seem small and inadequate.  Where, except perhap Jackson, Whistler, or Snowbird, can you get the kind of vertical, breadth, and challenge the poster is talking about?  Super-expert terrain is becoming a smaller and smaller locale.

post #23 of 86

Trust me....  There are plenty of opportunities for finding super gnar in the Jackson area regardless of how advanced your equipment gets.  There is almost limitless backcountry in several nearby ranges, the whole Alpine area is loaded with rowdy skiing terrain that "could" be accessed by snowmobile much of which has never been done.  If you lived in Alpine you would have no problem finding some good old boy sled heads who could help fabricate a custom tool for access.  

post #24 of 86
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the good comments.  I have actually already done extensive research on all the areas I mentioned.  I was hoping to get first hand comments from Bozemanians or Jackson Holers or Park Cityites or whatever on their towns and what kind of vibe and feel they had.  Interesting to hear that Park City may have become just too touristy.

 

I don't require extreme skiing all the time.  But I hate short vertical, slopes too flat to actually ski on with more than 10" of snow (even with my wide boards), and poorly designed runs with no sustained fall line.  Wolf Creek for instance gets tons of snow but it is too flat and has no sustained fall line runs.  So I know Steamboat isn't the peak of steepness but it does have size and variety and good snow.  Sun Valley is also not "extreme" but it also has tons of variety, long runs and sustained fall line skiing (not so good on snow though).  Everything is a balancing act here and I don't expect to get everything in one place.  Jackson is at the top of the list but it is expensive (I have checked out real estate there and I think I could barely afford it).  Snowbird/Alta would probably be next but that would probably require living in Salt Lake itself (or suburbs) and I'm not sure where the wife's four horses would go and I am not totally jazzed about living in SLC with the inversion and other big city issues.  Bozeman continually pops up because of Bridger and Big Sky and affordability, not to mention Montana State and other amenities.  Telluride, with the new terrain, is steep and varied enough but also very expensive.  When I have been talking about Park City I have usually been thinking Heber or Wanship or one of the outlying communities, where it is affordable.

 

So thanks for the comments and keep them coming but I would most appreciate first hand info from people who have actually lived in these areas that I haven't been to yet or haven't been to in a long time.

post #25 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I would take the downturn in property values as a chance to live close in (to a great resort), where property development opportunities are, and always will be, limited by number of build-able lots, and therefore of some value.


Bingo!   Right now is a great time. You just need to figure out what's important to YOU! You already live in a really nice place? 

 

 I personally like living IN town.  I like to be able to walk to skiing, grocery store, fine dining, live music,shops, ect.

For me,  Aspen's pretty close to perfect! Except United cancelled the last direct flight last night.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #26 of 86

As soon as I started reading your list the first place that popped in my head was Jackson hole..If I could afford it. That's where I would be..It seems weird to me that you have skied all the nice places, but have skipped Jackson hole..Worth a trip for sure. I would almost bet that if you went there for a trip., you might make a decision quickly.

post #27 of 86

But there's few listings in Jackson Hole (http://www.jhreassociates.com/All_Properties.htm#PropertyID=22993372, http://www.dianenodell.com/property/the-quintessential-jackson-hole-cabin?cnid=140012) of property by the ski area that would meet his needs and they are barely under $2 million.  I'd think from a real estate perspective he'd do better in Bozeman, although he'd have to decide whether he wanted to live near the town and mostly ski Bridger, since I think that Big Sky is well over his 30 minute commute and if he lived in Big Sky, well he'd lose that "real town".  It's been a while since we looked down there, but if I recall, most of the "in between" land is government park land of one kind or another. 

post #28 of 86

I find it interesting that the people who live around Jackson don't really get the point about "ritzy" or "vaunted heights", but most people who have visited have absolutely no problem seeing it.  I live in a pretty expensive area (NYCity second homes) and I'd say that real estate ad speaks for itself.  What does it say about how one becomes habituated to a certain lifestyle and economic level?

post #29 of 86

A thread about skiing, real estate, and Jackson - and Bob Peters hasn't chimed in yet? Must be a powder weekend.

post #30 of 86

Is there such a thing as a town of fewer than 50,000 people with "real culture and diversity?" 

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