EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Smartphone Speedometer Apps!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Smartphone Speedometer Apps!

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

icon14.gif

Last time I went skiing, I ran the speedview app on my droidx.  It's a gps based speedometer with your car in mind but I thought, why not for skiing too?  It runs in the background so you just put your phone in your pocket and forget about it.  

A few cool things about it:

  • records maximum speed (mine was 50mph!)
  • has a "speed graph".  Looks like an ekg, shows a flat line when you're on the chair, then spikes where you are actually skiing.  By counting the flats you can count the number of runs you made.  (I always lose track).  Also cool to find a high speed chair travels 10 mph!
  • tells you how many miles you traveled, but includes the lift rides as well.
  • you can export the data so you can keep track if you like

 

Best part it's a totally free app!  Anyone try this or any other speedometer app?

post #2 of 17

Thanks--I downloaded it and will try next time I go skiing

post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 

Oh yeah, I forgot one thing.  Before you go skiing,  you have to change the app's settings to run in the background.  Otherwise, the app won't run unless your screen is on.  Lemme know how you like it!

post #4 of 17

I have several different speedo apps on my Palm Pre.   First time I tried it I got upto 42mph and I wasnt even skiing what I would consider fast. I had downloaded them to verify the speedo on one of my cars, and they are very accurate as far as I can tell.

post #5 of 17

This has been discussed in other threads, but one issue is that a lot of GPS units aren't very accurate when you're rapidly changing altitude.  Even just measuring your altitude via GPS can be sketchy.

 

I have a Palm Pre, but have no clue how good its GPS is at things like this.  It's pretty accurate on flat ground.

post #6 of 17

Everyone I know who uses GPS to record skiing speeds reports top speeds at 70 or more miles per hour.  Some guys believe that, but most don't.  I suspect the inaccuracy of top speeds is caused when the GPS switches from one group of satellites to another.  I think 40 is fast on skis, and 50 about the limit on recreational trails.  When Jasper Shiely measured speeds, he caught only one skier faster than 50, and not many over 40 or so, IIRC.  If I'm doing 60, they better clear the trails and put the B fences up.

 

BK

 

 

 

post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 

I totally trust the readings on my speed view.  50 mph tops.  I'm skiing on 188 cm. Fischer RS GS skis.   Most runs were in the 40-45 mph range.  They don't call me Ole Thunderball for nothing.

 

post #8 of 17


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthias99 View Post

This has been discussed in other threads, but one issue is that a lot of GPS units aren't very accurate when you're rapidly changing altitude.  Even just measuring your altitude via GPS can be sketchy.

 

I have a Palm Pre, but have no clue how good its GPS is at things like this.  It's pretty accurate on flat ground.



Make sure you get all the goodies to overclock it and speed it up.   I was ready to toss mine out the window then I "souped it up" and it metamorphosed the phone.   Its now awesome.  Mine runs at 1GHz and there is a kernel called SR-71 to run it at 1.2GHz.  Stock Pre' runs at only 500MHz.  New HP(Palm) Pre' 3 is coming out that will run a 2GHz.

 

post #9 of 17

I ran the GPS based ski app on an iPhone while driving about a mile and a half in my car.  It said my max speed was 68 mph, when in reality I did not exceed 35 mph.  It also told me I rode 14 lifts!  If you read other posts about this - it's pretty clear that these apps don't always work very well.  It's amazing how many weekend warriors are hitting 78 mph and averaging 40+ mph on the ski hill.  

post #10 of 17

Try the Phresheez app for skiing.  Speed readings seem pretty accurate on my iPhone.  My max is typically 35-40mph and that seems right about where I should be.  Also has digitized maps of many ski areas and tracks your # runs for the day and vertical skied.

 

Mike

post #11 of 17

On iOS, MotionX GPS is a great app for logging ski data. It has a specific setting for skiing which works very well.  I've also tested it side-by-side with a Garmin Edge GPS for cycling use and a calibrated speedometer in a car, and it records speed quite well, if not as quick to the punch as the Garmin.  Still, though, it's accurate enough for most use, and isn't a major battery hog.  And it also tracks vertical, speed intervals, etc., quite a bit of data to crunch.

post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ILOJ View Post

I ran the GPS based ski app on an iPhone while driving about a mile and a half in my car.  It said my max speed was 68 mph, when in reality I did not exceed 35 mph.  It also told me I rode 14 lifts!  If you read other posts about this - it's pretty clear that these apps don't always work very well.  It's amazing how many weekend warriors are hitting 78 mph and averaging 40+ mph on the ski hill.  


iPhone. Nuff said. duel.gif

Sent from my DROIDX using Tapatalk
Edited by Master Gater - 3/24/11 at 10:18am
post #13 of 17

I use ski tracks on the iphone. Not sure about the speed accuracy, I'm mostly interested in the vertical feet which it seems to do pretty well. 

post #14 of 17

I also use the free Speedview app for Android.

 

But why keep it in your pocket?
 

 

Photobucket

post #15 of 17

I once left my GPS on in the car for a few hours while it was parked in the driveway.  Then I looked at the tracks.  It said it had moved back and forth all over my block.

 

Another time I took it skiing, and then overlaid the data points in Google Maps.  I stayed on the trails but lots of the data points were in the trees and even outside the ski area boundary.

 

That was sufficient to prove to me that it's just not that accurate.  So if you're going at say 30mph, heading North, and the GPS all of a sudden places you even farther North than you are due to an inaccuracy, it will falsely report that you're going faster than you are.

 

The iPhone doesn't have this, but my main GPS displays "Accuracy:  ___ feet".  That can be anywhere from 10 to 200.  The iPhone isn't going to magically be more accurate than that, I'm sure.

post #16 of 17

Recreational GPS horizontal accuracy is generally around the 10 foot mark, though certainly this varies and I'm not sure if phone types are as good.

Mountain environments are not ideal, so can lose satellites (and hence accuracy) if trees nearby or steep ridges/mountains.

 

Despite the above, I believe GPS gets a little unfairly maligned by many for speed accuracy.

Yes, there will be occasional random readings of 70 or 80, but on average they seem fairly accurate.  If used in conjunction with some common sense - ie when you suddenly get a reading of 60 on a run which you normally hit 40 on, disregard.  If you ski a run 5 times at a similar speed the readings will generally be consistent in my experience, with occasional random results which will hopefully be apparent.

 

Bode Klammer - I'm surprised with a name like that you think 40 is fast on skis.  In my opinion, for decent rec skiers 40 is pretty average - if letting rip a little.  For good advanced - expert skiers, hitting 50 should be no problem on a groomer with a bit of pitch - can do this even on many blue runs.  60 should be quite achievable on good skis if tucking on an uncrowded slope, though it may be iffy on many of todays fatter things, but you get the idea.

post #17 of 17

Fully agree with BCiski.   When I first got my Garmin GPSmap76CS I took it skiing until the novelty wore off.  I heard that the max speed feature was very inaccurate, so took to keeping a track log and downloading the tracks.   There were the occasional obvious errors (e.g. 240 mph), but with the track logs, you can spot the obvious errors.  The speeds in the track logs are simply straight line horizontal distance divided by time between points, so no vertical component, but elevation is recorded too so I was able to do some math.  Taking into account turn radius and vertical distance will increase actual on-snow speed from recorded speed, and the max speed feature seems to work and record actual maximum speed. 

 

BTW after a few years I've reached the conclusion that the max speed feature on my Garmin is pretty accurate most of the time.  Nothing is perfect all the time; even radar guns have been known to clock barns moving at 70 mph.

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Smartphone Speedometer Apps!