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Opinions on mid priced ski boots

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hi skiers,

 

I am an newbie here and this looks like a great site with tons of info.

 

So here is the deal, I just started skiing again after about a 10 year layoff.  I am 31yo 5'10" about 200lbs. I demo'd a ton of skis and  loved and bought the Volkl AC30's. I am not the typical beginner, but no expert either.

 

I tried on a couple boots so far like the Nordica hot rod 85 and the Salomen Mission 10's,but our local shop dosent demo boots.

 

What are your opinons on boots in the $400 range, how does the Nordica HR 75 compare to the 85's

 

 

Thanks Jason

post #2 of 7

Nobody can tell you which boot to buy on the internet.

 

Get thee to a qualified fitter and find the boot that fits YOUR foot and skiing style. Truly.

post #3 of 7

Welcome to EpicSki and welcome back to skiing.  The Nordica HR 75 and 85 are both pretty soft boots with the 75 being softer.  I suspect they will both be too soft for you in very short order.  They are also very likely made for wide feet because the ski boot makers normally assume that only racers and experts need a narrow, C width, boot and all other skiers have fat feet.  Volklgirl is correct in that you need to go to a boot fitter so you get boots that actually fit your feet.  The majority of stores that sell skis don't know how to fit boots.  Go to the "Ask the Boot Guys" forum and read the wikis about fitting and terminology and check the list of fitters to see if there is one listed near you.  If there isn't one listed, ask for a recommendation and the chances are good that someone here can recommend a fitter.  Boots are the most important piece of gear you can buy for skiing so get it right to begin with.  When your feet are happy, you have more fun.

post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by volklgirl View Post

Nobody can tell you which boot to buy on the internet.

 

Get thee to a qualified fitter and find the boot that fits YOUR foot and skiing style. Truly.



Wise words!  It's the one thing I can't help any of my new-to-skiing friends with.  Find a good bootfitter, and go (and then come back for ski advice :) ) 

post #5 of 7

The importance of getting your boots ( best with custom footbeds) fit by a qualified boots fitter cannot be over emphasized because it will maximize their performance and comfort. If you buy boots on the net and then go to a boot fitter, you may end up spending the same or more than if you bought them from a shop and got the fitting as part of the price.  So make sure you know the ultimate price of your boots.

 

There are many good mid-priced boots, but they often do not have the adjustment features of the high end models.  Things like adjustable forward lean, cuff canting, and flex adjustment allow you to better tailor the boot to your body/foot type and style of skiing.  So make sure you consider all aspects of a boot, and not just the initial fit.

 

Obviously, price is a concern, but your boots are your connection to what is going on, so they are the most important ski equipment you can buy.  You are much better off with good boots that are set up correctly and used skis, than the latest skis and ill fitting boots.  Good fitting boots will make you ski better and longer, and be happier than anything else you can do.

 

If your feet hurt, it does not matter what else is going on, you are not having a good time.

post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

Welcome to EpicSki and welcome back to skiing.  The Nordica HR 75 and 85 are both pretty soft boots with the 75 being softer.  I suspect they will both be too soft for you in very short order.  They are also very likely made for wide feet because the ski boot makers normally assume that only racers and experts need a narrow, C width, boot and all other skiers have fat feet.  Volklgirl is correct in that you need to go to a boot fitter so you get boots that actually fit your feet.  The majority of stores that sell skis don't know how to fit boots.  Go to the "Ask the Boot Guys" forum and read the wikis about fitting and terminology and check the list of fitters to see if there is one listed near you.  If there isn't one listed, ask for a recommendation and the chances are good that someone here can recommend a fitter.  Boots are the most important piece of gear you can buy for skiing so get it right to begin with.  When your feet are happy, you have more fun.

Agree that the boots will be too soft.  I'm currently regretting that my new(er) boots are only100 flex.

If you divide the cost of pricier boots by the number of ski days and compare to the cost of lift tickets, travel, etc., it's worth the cost.
 

 

post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the replies,

 

I went back and tried on a few more boots with the local boot fitter. He had me try on some more high end boots to show the difference in how they fit my foot. I ended up getting the Salomon mission 10's as they seemed to fit my feet the best.

 

I got to ski on them this weekend and by the time my old boots would be killing me (about 2:00) I was suprised to find that my feet were not hurting. So far very happy with my purchace. Also noticed I had better feel for my skies.

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