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DPS Wailer 112 (AKA the Banana Ski)

post #1 of 228
Thread Starter 

 

Product: 2011(?) DPS Wailer 112RP (AKA the Banana Ski)

 

Length/size Tested: 190

 

Environment of Conditions:

*Location of review: Squaw Valley

*Runs Taken: 1 day

*Snow Conditions: powder

*Demo or Purchase: demo

 

wailer112RP_h_1.png

 

Summary:

3-word review: what the S7 should have been

(funny looks, killer performance and killer versatility)

I got to take out a pair of 190 Wailer 112RPs from on my birthday (thanks Phil!).  This is the bright yellow "banana" ski that started to show in the lift lines at Squaw recently, so I was intrigued.  Rockered tips and tails, normal camber section under foot.  The defining feature of the ski is definitely it's huge rockered tip.  That rocker is bigger than anything I have seen on a mainstream ski and in combination with the bright yellow color of the top sheet, you can spot a Wailer from a mile afar. DPS graphics are very minimalist, but classy, and the ski looks very well made.  I skied the Hybrid construction, which is the cheaper of the two they make.

 

Conditions.  The day was typical Squaw storm day- poor visibility, windy, lots of snow, and even more people cutting up that snow, so the skiing was a typical resort powder- not many first tracks, but lots of soft bumps and cut-up powder.

Skiing impressions.  This ski totally defied my expectations.  I spent this season on another indie double-rockered powder ski, Bluehouse Maestro, so I was expecting a typical indie ski ride- great geometry in smooth 3D snow in the morning, then deteriorating as the day goes on and snow gets cruddier.  When I looked at the ski I thought that the tip would flop around, catch in bumps, and transmit everything to the boot, basically a ski to slay the hero snow on your next Heli trip....  Not even close...  The Wailer rocked in the "resort powder", and the more the day went on, the better I felt.
Any ski with that much rocker and 112 underfoot is going to be a blast in smooth deep snow, so no surprise there, the ski felt great, and had more of a surfy feeling, the tips definitely pull it to the surface. The ski turns very predictably in powder, the tip raises so high, that it it is not hooky at all, and the taper helps a lot. The sweet spot is HUGE, I was able to go through the cut up powder while being so far in the backseat I was ashamed of doing it.   A couple of times going through the bumpy slope in near whiteout I got thrown forward so hard that I was afraid my goggles would hit the ski tips- no problem, I felt the tips rise and pull me up. However funny Wailer geometry looks, it works very well.  The tail feels soft but it is there.  I was also surprised by how damp the ski felt, this is quality construction, very smooth.  It definitely skis short, on anything remotely firm it feels like a 170-is ski, very nimble.  Unlike my Maestros the torsional stiffness is there in spades, Wailer feels very secure on steeps, and its as competent of a carver as a 112 mm ski can be (granted, on that day there was not a trace of ice, so he jury may be still out on that part).  These skis fly through trees, point and shoot type.  Amazingly quick for the 190, you can toss then sideways in a split second. I am usually a very cautious tree skier, but I was having a blast.  
Soft bumps were nothing short of a revelation, the Wailer skis bumps so much better than a long (190!) 112 mm ski is ever expected to do.  The tips are so tall, that you can almost stuff them into the bump and they would nor catch, the front has the right stiffness pattern, and the rockered tails release easily. A couple of times I caught myself skiing through the soft bumps almost without thinking, which almost never happens to me on any ski.   That same huge tip does a good job smoothing the terrain when going fast, so I was not able to find a speed limit to the ski.  It was so much fun to ski a bumpy powdery pitch until my legs could not take it anymore, and then straight-line  the last portion in whatever position I found myself in - you can ride that ski off it's tails, or you can stay forward and let the rocker do its job, the sweet spot is so big that it will take it all without complaining.  

 

Negatives:  I sometimes felt that 112 width was a tad too narrow, but that is probably nitpicking.

Conclusion: This ski is a surprising winner, the geometry looks funny, but it works incredibly well and it makes it unusually well-rounded for a real resort powder ski.  This is one of those skis that you can ski all day and not want to go to the car to change to something less radical.  A "fun shape" ski for a real resort should feel like: fun, effortless, and still plenty of muscle.  That ski should be a hit with good skiers who don't ski virgin powder all the time and who don't want to put in an effort required for a competition-level pair of boards.  It addresses most of the complaints the Rossi S7 is getting by managing to work well in both smooth and rough snow.  DPS markets this ski as a one-ski quiver, I am not sure I will choose to ski it on icy groomers, but as a powder ski in Tahoe this is one of the leading contenders and  maybe the best I have tried so far. The Banana rocks...  

 

 

Other skis in class:

110+ resort powder skis: Rossi S7, Atomic BentChetler, Dynastar HugeRocker, almost every indie company makes a ski in this group. I also really liked how the Dynastar ProRider115 skied on a similar day, but PR115 was much more demanding, compared to that ski the Wailer is on autopilot.  

 

P.S.  I am not sure the Nano (the more expensive pure carbon construction) makes as lot of sense, as the lighter weight should take away some of the dampness. I would be happy skiing the Hybrid.  

 

P.P.S.  I hope I will be able to get one for next year.

 

Tester Info:

Age: 40

Height/Weight: 6ft/190lb

Average days on snow: 0-10, 11-25, 30+  (pick one)

Years Skiing: 0-5, 6-15, 15-30, 30+  (pick one)

 

Aggressiveness: Conservative / Moderate / Aggressive / Competitor (pick one)

 

 

Pictures of the front shape and the rocker profile (sorry for the powder cord obscuring some of the camber underfoot).

P1020034.jpgP1020037.jpg


Edited by alexzn - 4/4/11 at 10:09pm
post #2 of 228

I need to figure out a way to try a pair of these.  I don't think I've read a bad review yet.


 

post #3 of 228

D@MN....

I have suspected that these would get on the must have list...

Time to start building the new ski fund for 2011/2012...

post #4 of 228

LOVED THIS SKI!  PERIOD.... makes chunder, chop or whatever crappy snow fun and smoooooth.  Oh, yeah also has great float too :)  Comparing to My Bent chetlers, I don't think I gave up anything and was more stable and even in chopped up heavy snow, I didn't feel any deflection. the 190 is short and is more like a 184-6. As said, Gi-normous sweet spot.  Turns on a dime: very amenable to varied turn shape, carve, slarve it; whatever, the tail releases so smoothly but didn't wash out,  the tips cut through and do an excellent job, I had zero issues with deflection, shovels hookup up very well at the the widest point (TR), not catchy, easy to butter turns and feather edges.. Gone are the days when you had to "survive" on a rockered ski on the groomed or tracked.  Super stable and fun on the soft groomed  The title Resort Powder  describes this ski perfectly  

post #5 of 228

I saw a guy on a pair at Silverton Mt. last Friday.  I thought they looked stupid in the lift line because of the huge rocker. It got real warm and slushed up big time. I saw the guy again near the end of the day and he had a very smooth groove going. He was skiing fast, popping and ripping and looked smoother and less tired than anyone else on the mountain in the heavy slush.

post #6 of 228

So Finn, I know you were debating 190 vs 184.  After skiing the 190, what are you thinking?

post #7 of 228
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post

I saw a guy on a pair at Silverton Mt. last Friday.  I thought they looked stupid in the lift line because of the huge rocker. It got real warm and slushed up big time. I saw the guy again near the end of the day and he had a very smooth groove going. He was skiing fast, popping and ripping and looked smoother and less tired than anyone else on the mountain in the heavy slush.


Yeah... this was my reaction exactly.  Saw the Wailer in the lift line the day before, though that it looked totally stupid and that this rockered tip would hang up on everything. Skied it the next day, and discovered that the rocker is big enough to get out of the way when it is not needed, and is still there when you need.  A winner, at least for me.  At 6/190, I am definitely in a 190 category, and it also skied super-short. 

 

post #8 of 228

yep, 190, without a doubt.  Yeah, big floppy looking tip- but its not; it really holds up well, like Phil said, its what the 7 should be. I will buy regardless but the banana color doesn't help with the perception of a clown-shoe ski. the pures are coming in red as a special edition 

post #9 of 228

This ski will go down in history as an absolute classic.  I was really surprised that we have not yet seen more imitators come out with something more similar (nothing coming in 2012), but I have a feeling that we will see a bunch of wannabees copy more of this geometry and profile in the following seasons.  The success of this ski cannot be ignored.

 

I like the "point and shoot" reference in the review.  I find that very apt in describing how it skis - very intuitive.  The 112RP rewards good technique, but it also doesn't punish bad technique - it's not a demanding ski.  It's more of a 5-mile smile kind of experience.

 

One of the more surprising characteristics of the ski is how the tail rocker allows you to make turns from ridiculously backseat positions.  On most skis when you get very far back you're stuck and it's difficult to carve the ski around.  The tail rocker on the 112RP allows you to shred beautiful turns while you're in full-on wheelie mode.  Sometimes it's just too much fun for one skier to handle.

post #10 of 228
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

yep, 190, without a doubt.  Yeah, big floppy looking tip- but its not; it really holds up well, like Phil said, its what the 7 should be. I will buy regardless but the banana color doesn't help with the perception of a clown-shoe ski. the pures are coming in red as a special edition 

Umm...umm... that was...my line.... rolleyes.gif
 

 

post #11 of 228

That's it, I am definitely demoing a pair when i get to Utah this week.  Now I just need to figure out what the best day(s) is going to be.

post #12 of 228

Thanks for the great review, Alexzn.  Do you think it is primarily the bigger tip and that make it outperform the S7 in rough snow? 

post #13 of 228
Thread Starter 

I have not skied them side by side, but I think the secret is having a stiff-ish tip that also has a very tall rocker which just rides above the small stuff, so the tip does not flop.  Construction also helps, at least the ski felt like a quality construction, pretty damp.   

My current powder ski (Bluehouse Maestro) and some other low rise rocker skis (Pro115,  etc) deal with the same problem by using low-slung tip that tries to slice through, which also works, but not as effectively.   

post #14 of 228

My guide at Irwin Catski (Crested Butte) had a pair of these on back in early March.  Of course, he could likely use 2x4's and ski better than me, but he didn't seem to be working too hard, even with the breakable crust garbage we were faced with.  My comment is - looking them over, they had a 'bamboo core' label on them.  Does that make it the hybrid, or were those some one-off prototypes?  The POWDER magazine review said it had a poplar/x-wood core.

post #15 of 228

Bamboo = Hybrid

 

What makes the 112RP better than the S7 is the overall flex (stiff), flex pattern, rocker profile, and tail geometry.  Pretty much everything. rolleyes.gif

post #16 of 228
Any skiing difference between the 2 construction choices: Pure vs Hybrid?
post #17 of 228

Well,I stand corrected, you need to put a "R" next to that quote!  
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post



Umm...umm... that was...my line.... rolleyes.gif
 

 



 

post #18 of 228

I forgot to post my review and pics here (had a separate post)...these boards are too good to miss...(I broke down and bought a pair of 178 hybrids for easter tree-noodling, just because that was all they had left....seriously considering getting 184 or 190 pures for open terrain...like the TGR post says "My wallet is in for a beating...")

 

The "Yvette" model is exactly the same as the Wailer 112...just a different color and smaller lengths marketed to the female population.

 

 

Product: DPS Wailer 112RP, DPS Yvette 112RP

 

Length/size Tested 184cm (Wailer), 178cm (Yvette)

 

Environment of Conditions:

*Location of review: Stowe, VT

*Runs Taken: Can't count them

*Snow Conditions: Powder (shin-to-knee-deep), cut-up powder, packed powder, trees, bumps and hardpack surfaces, cold, dry snow.

*Demo or Purchase:  Demo

 

Summary (inc. Strengths & Weaknesses):


Quite simply, the DPS 112RP "Resort Pow" hybrid is the most versatile, fun and stunning ski I  have ever tested. Highest levels of performance in powder, bumps, crud, cut-up powder, groomers, trees, open terrain and variable surfaces of frontside, backside and sidecountry skiing at slow to high speeds with extremely easy handling and highest levels of fun in an amazingly lightweight package. DPS claims the 112RP is a "Game Changer", and they're right. "If you have ever seen a deer bounding through the woods, you have an idea what it's like to ride the DPS 112RP in the trees". The DPS 112RP is a legitimate candidate for the new benchmark of a one-ski quiver.

 

Strengths:

 

Extreme versatility, reactivity and high performance in a huge variety of terrain and surfaces.


Weaknesses:

None, unless you want to ski super-G speeds or race gates or haunt icy boilerplate.

 

Tester Info:

Age: 51

Height/Weight: 5'11" 178 lbs.

Average days on snow: 0-10, 11-25, 30+  (pick one)

Years Skiing: 0-5, 6-15, 15-30, 30+  (pick one)

 

Aggressiveness: Conservative / Moderate / Aggressive / Competitor (pick one)

 

 

 

 

My review format:

 

DPS Wailer 112RP Hybrid
DPS Yvette 112RP Hybrid

2011-2012

141-112-128mm, r=18m @184cm
141-112-128mm, r=18m @178cm



Photo courtesy of Bob Nooney of Maui, Hawaii (we liked his pic of the 112RP on snow) - thanks for letting us use it!

 

Manufacturer Info:

DPS Skis
1549 S. 110 E #B
Salt Lake City, UT 84105
Phone: 801-413-1737
http://www.dpsskis.com

 

Note:

 

DPS offers the 112EP model in two different constructions: "Pure" and "Hybrid".  This test evaluated two lengths of the "Hybrid" construction.  The "Pure" construction consists of a poplar core (with titanal ribs running vertically through the core - their "SS" technology) sandwiched between DPS's own carbon-prepeg laminate layers and "nano" carbon composite materials.  The "Hybrid" construction consists of a bamboo core with more traditional triaxial fiberglass and tip-to-tail carbon stringers.  Both models utilize DPS's special adhesives and pressing/curing technology. The Pure construction is extremely lightweight and very responsive and expensive, while the Hybrid construction is slightly heavier, more damp and less expensive.  Ski geometry is identical between the Pure and Hybrid models.  The Yvette and Wailer 112RP are exactly the same ski, just different lengths and colors (Yvette is only marketed as a woman's ski due to its length).


Suggested Retail Price (MSRP):

$1199 USD - Pure
$799 USD - Hybrid


Usage Class:

All terrain rockered freeride

Your Rating (with comments): (1="get me off these things"->10="I have to own a pair")

10 for off-piste. 9 for groomed surface carving.

Technical Ski Data:

Hybrid construction of bamboo core with carbon fibre stringers top and bottom, triaxial fiberglass, UHMW sidewalls, urethane top edge reinforcement, urethane dampening, Austrian World Cup graphite base. Tip and tail rocker. 2.1 kg per ski (184cm), 2.0 kg per ski (178cm). 143cm running surface (184cm), 137cm running surface (178cm). "Pure" version (poplar and carbon-prepeg/nano construction) not tested.

Pre-Skiing Impression:

High-quality fit and finish, very, very lightweight with snappy rebound and high torsional strength when hand-flexed. Very distinctive "multi-point" shaping, tip and tail taper and rocker profile geometry. Excellent, clear colors in a glossy topsheet.

Test Conditions:

Powder (shin-to-knee-deep), cut-up powder, packed powder, windblown snow, trees, bumps and groomed hardpack surfaces, cold, dry snow.

Test Results:

Ideal testing conditions after two feet of new snow on a wide variety of terrain ranging from light powder in the trees to windbuffed chalky powder, packed groomers and cue-ball windblown crests existed for testing DPS Wailer 112RP. I tested the new 184cm Wailer hybrid first, then the 178 "Yvette" hybrid (same ski, proportionally scaled to 178cm with same radius - blue color). The 112RP impressed me just skating to the lift with its crisp grip,light weight and peppy rebound. I immediately learned the 112RP handles without effort in any situation and speed.  You can edge it quickly from low to high angles and it grips. You can pressure it aggressively or ride it passively and it goes wherever you point it on-demand.  Security and confidence are fed back to the rider in low or high pressure conditions.  The 112RP can chop turn, slarve, smear, rail, pivot, drift, cut, thrust and glide with just the slightest input from the rider, and provide a huge range of response from subtle direction change to big rebound or rock-steady line holding. The rockered tip and tail soaked up terrain in a playful, responsive way, yet edge grip was truly impressive, quick, secure and able to handle nearly any turn shape and radius I wanted.

One of the surprising things was the zero-learning-curve required to get the 112RP to do its magic.  I got on the 112RP right after testing another brand of rockered ski of similar dimensions (107 underfoot), and while the feel and personality was totally different, I instantly "got it" and we were immediately off to the circus. Quick, short-radius turns along the edges of trails were easy and I could pick any point on the tops, sides, uphill face, or downhill face of powdery bumps for turns without a second thought.  The 112RP can snap and hop along the tops, sluice through the troughs, slide off the side of the trail to snag some untouched powder, then blast back onto the hardpack with a frisky, playful personality.  In nearly any situation, the words "frisky" and "fun" came to mind over and over. The 112RP can jack-rabbit in and out along the edges, then lay a trench across the trail to track some GS turns on the groomers back to the lift at easy or eye-watering speeds.  It's not a race ski, nor does it pretend to be.  DPS has created a ski that essentially does everything else besides race gates on boilerplate, although I found its security and grip on cue-ball surfaces impressively superior compared to other rockered skis over 100mm underfoot, and better than many narrower skis. The Wailer 112RP requires no special weighting, technique or stance to get it to lock into a carved turn, and once it's hooked-up, it is one of those skis that "pulls" you through your chosen line, never requiring the rider to "hold it on-line" or pay particular attention to managing the ski's behavior through the turn to the next one. Never a wash-out, never a twitch, just elegant grip and power.  Some rockered skis are difficult to get hooked-up on-edge, or never really get a secure grip, while others might hook-up, but may suddenly wash-out if your stance isn't just right or you hit a slick or firmer patch of snow.  This never happened with the DPS 112RP.  Frankly, it carved lines better than many all-mountain and frontside-specific skis we've tried, then really shined when it got back into 3D snow conditions.  You can alter the turn shape and radius at any point in your arc without any significant effort.

If you owned a racecarver and a pair of 112RPs, you could handle any surface and any terrain and never feel like you wanted anything else.  The light weight and responsive, playful behavior makes the 112RP just about perfect in the tight trees.  Quick direction changes, speed scrubbing, hopping, ducking branches and arcing around holes is basically effortless.  If you have ever seen a deer bounding through the woods, you have an idea what it's like to ride the DPS 112RP in the trees. The tips float just enough without forcing the ski to the surface unless you want them to, while tracking without deflection.  Bring up the speed and you can skim the surface at will.  Turn on a dime...no problem.  Cruise a big arc...no problem.  Hop branches and logs...no problem.  DPS has created a really, really fun ski that seems to have very few, if any, shortcomings.  The one thing that impressed me was how versatile it was.  On-piste, off-piste, the 112RP just rips everywhere. The bases are impressively fast and the demo pairs I looked at had very little wear and damage, even with the generous usage Mike Cannon (Direct Sales Manager for DPS) gets out of them by getting tons of people on them all the time for evaluation. (As a side note, Mike gets his demos on the hill constantly, and I saw no less than 4 or 5 pairs out during the day at Stowe, and everyone seemed giddy about them.) The scaled-down 178cm "Yvette" version of the 184 "Wailer" I tested had all the same behavior, but felt like a quicker, tighter radius version, despite the specification of 18m radius for both lengths. The 178 was shorter and felt quicker and ideal for tight Eastern woods, while still being stable and confident cruising at speed.  Deciding which length to get will require people to demo the sizes for themselves. While some skis present an excellent geometry, and some skis boast high-quality materials, and others enjoy superb construction discipline, rarely does the synergistic blend come together into one ski.  DPS has created the combination most ski builders wish they had the talent, technology and time to achieve.  All the planets aligned just right, and the 112RP is the result.

 

The DPS 112RP ski really is a game-changer - no fooling around. While you might want something over 112mm underfoot with a bigger radius for truly epic, bottomless days or extreme terrain surfing in Alaska or somewhere "big" (DPS has the Lotus 120 and 138 for those environments), DPS has created a ski that does 99% of what skiers want on the terrain most skiers frequent, and it does it superbly.  Based on people's descriptions of their other models of DPS skis owned for several years, these skis should last many seasons and retain their performance.  These are really fun and impressive skis.

Analogies: (this ski is like...)

The ski you always wanted for all terrain.
 
Things You Would Change About This Ski:
 
Offer more colors.


Short Answer When Someone Asks "What Do You Think About This Ski?":

Probably the most impressive all-terrain ski I've ever tried.

Advice To People Considering This Ski:

Order two pairs and keep one pair safely hidden away.

Self-Description of Skiing Style, Ability, Experience, Preferences:

5' 11", 180 lbs. Expert groomed-surface carver, "old-style" race inspired, "foot steerer" with fairly sensitive edging feel. Loves to hold long arcs with lots of pressure on the downhill ski (you know the type),  but also loves the feel of both skis on-edge leaving tiny railroad track edge tracks.  Loves powder when it's not tracked out. 10 year coach for youth race team in New England (bulletproof is the norm).

 


DPS 112RP "Wailer" (yellow) and "Yvette" (blue)


DPS 112RP "Wailer" (yellow) and "Yvette" (blue)

 

 

 

 Conditions in the trees were excellent.

post #19 of 228

i am totally getting a pair of these. i have been watching them for a while.  question is...is the Pure worth it? take money off the table for a min. what is the difference? i am a big guy. 6'2" 240. which one is best for me?

 

help me Ob1,

post #20 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by opimian View Post

i am totally getting a pair of these. i have been watching them for a while.  question is...is the Pure worth it? take money off the table for a min. what is the difference? i am a big guy. 6'2" 240. which one is best for me?

 

help me Ob1,


The Pure is worth it if you plan on doing a lot of hiking, otherwise the Hybrid (in 190) will suite you fine. We are doing a pre-order at The Start Haus if you are interested. 

 

post #21 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by opimian View Post

i am totally getting a pair of these. i have been watching them for a while.  question is...is the Pure worth it? take money off the table for a min. what is the difference? i am a big guy. 6'2" 240. which one is best for me?

 

help me Ob1,


I have the pure and skied a friends Hybrid in the exact same dimensions, back to back.

 There is a difference, but for resort skiing, the difference is slight enough that I'm not sure it matters to the average skier.  

 

post #22 of 228

thanks Phil, Sent a PM to get a price on the pre-order.

 

as a side note, what do you think of the Lotus 120 for truely deep days? the RP is going to be a mid-point in a quiver of 3. i am thinking something is the 120-130+ range for eh bottemless. Praxis powder/protest or ON3P Caylor are also in play. 

post #23 of 228

Well, hopping in here for fun... Given the quiver structure, rather than the 120,  I'd be more inclined toward the following, in no particular order, for "bottomless":

 

Praxis Powder

K2 Pon2oon

Praxis Protest

DPS Lotus 138

ON3P Pillow Fight

 

If I *had* to pick one big day ski, that'd be my menu to choose from. All are awesome or reasonably predicted to be so.

 

I have not skied the Lotus 120 or the Pillow Fight. But I have skied this class of ski a bunch (probably well over a hundred days collectively on the Powder, Protest, and redline generation 138 -- and a couple dozen on the original Pontoon....). Between the specs, talking with a couple of the ON3P guys, and seeing a pair of PF protos on the snow, I'm pretty confident that is going to be a killer big day ski. Also worth noting, the Caylor is very stiff - you may or may not like that. It is also more bidirectional than some of the other skis under discussion (good if it matters to you...).  The Pon2oon is s stunningly good ski across a much broader range of conditions than the original (179 probably = sweet spot except for big lines IMO). At least the older 138s want a harder driving style than some of the others. I love both the Powders and Protests (prefer both in the 190s).

 

Also, I think Marshall (IIRC) talked about the difference in handling between hybrid and pure over at TGR. Even the older carbon layups (like the redline 138s) were incredibly torsionally rigid. Supposedly the pures continue that tradition and then some. 

 

Back to the RP...smile.gif


Edited by spindrift - 5/29/11 at 7:56pm
post #24 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post




The Pure is worth it if you plan on doing a lot of hiking, otherwise the Hybrid (in 190) will suite you fine. We are doing a pre-order at The Start Haus if you are interested. 

 

I am definitely interested.  A PM is on the way.  Now does anyone want to buy a pair of Icelantic Keepers?  biggrin.gif
 

 

post #25 of 228

my dps are ordered,ready for action by mid-July maybe..?

 

the way its going Imay need them!

post #26 of 228

My RPs (hybrid) are ordered too.  Slight modification to the right ski, of course; also courtesy of Start Haus.  

post #27 of 228

i cant wait to buy my pair next year

post #28 of 228

Just sold me, cant get here fast enough.

post #29 of 228

I am sold on a pair too I just need to get rid of my Keepers first.

post #30 of 228

I am McLuvin mine..even if they are red. 

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