EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Remounted heel piece... someone let me know if I effed up.
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Remounted heel piece... someone let me know if I effed up.

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hello,

 

I just remounted a heel piece on 2009 K2 Apache Raiders (I got new boots, ski shop couldn't get it done before I leave for ski trip, yes skis do suck, but they'll still work better than my race skis if things get powdery).

 

Anyway, I unscrewed two heel screws, slid up the heel piece to new level, screwed in tightly (no torque wrench, but it felt approximately equal as they were before).

 

Anyway, I then adjusted DIN (for new boots), and heel pressure so tab was flush.

 

 

Did I miss any important steps like glue?  (these bindings went on pre-holed plastic risers).  Someone please tell me if this worked or if I'm going to kill myself on the first run.

post #2 of 14

Aren't the Raiders systems, that you can just slid on there?  I think you're all set, but I'm not too familiar with that ski.

post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RaceDude View Post

Aren't the Raiders systems, that you can just slid on there?  I think you're all set, but I'm not too familiar with that ski.



Yep, it's definitely a slide-to-adjust setup, but unlike some such things (like railflex), you still have to actually screw the screws in.  So I guess most of the up-down torque is taken care of by the rail (toe/heel pieces are fixed onto rail like rollercoaster cars are fixed to track via wheels).

 

The skis appear to be ready to go, I just wasn't sure about the glue (but as I'm browsing threads here it seems that is more for plates that go directly into ski).  There is so much smoke-in-mirrors stuff with bindings and all this "oh crap, you better have you shop do this serious thing."  Perhaps that's not the case here.

 

post #4 of 14

Check two things,  forward pressure and make sure boot center is on or near the line. Wouldn't hurt to have them checked where you are skiing. It would suck to find out that you did it wrong the hard way wouldn't it? Good luck,   Dave

post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daveski7 View Post

Check two things,  forward pressure and make sure boot center is on or near the line. Wouldn't hurt to have them checked where you are skiing. It would suck to find out that you did it wrong the hard way wouldn't it? Good luck,   Dave



Thanks for advice.  Yes, forward pressure is perfect, and boot center is right on the market line on the ski.  I was more asking about the mechanical durability/viability of my home-made screw-in job (just wasn't sure if I needed glue).

 

Anyway, to you or anyone else reading this, forgive me if this is a stupid question... but:  If the bindings are set to my DIN and they didn't release or otherwise pass the "release test," then wouldn't they be trash?  I mean, aren't there bigger problems if the bindings don't release?  (like, isn't that pretty much an integral part of their functioning)???

 

Also, could a ski shop tech or somebody otherwise familiar tell me how often you test bindings which fail release tests?

 

post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoredAtBMBW View Post





Thanks for advice.  Yes, forward pressure is perfect, and boot center is right on the market line on the ski.  I was more asking about the mechanical durability/viability of my home-made screw-in job (just wasn't sure if I needed glue). You sound good then

 

Anyway, to you or anyone else reading this, forgive me if this is a stupid question... but:  If the bindings are set to my DIN and they didn't release or otherwise pass the "release test," then wouldn't they be trash?  I mean, aren't there bigger problems if the bindings don't release?  (like, isn't that pretty much an integral part of their functioning)???  If they didn't pass a machine release test at the shop I work at, we probably wouldn't let you leave with the ski until we figure out what the problem is.  Given that we only work on bindings that are on "the list" we would probably just call our rep for that company and have them warrantied, or sell you new ones ;)  Either way it would be a bunch of paper work if you wanted to walk out with a binding that didn't pass

 

Also, could a ski shop tech or somebody otherwise familiar tell me how often you test bindings which fail release tests?  I can remember three this year when I was working at a pretty high end, high traffic, store.  One was because the bindings were crap (but still indemnified), one was because the customers boots were crap (think 1980's rear entry boots that had no plastic left on the toe/heel where the binding clamps on the boot), and the other one was when a customer insisted that we put his DIN at like 4 or something when he charted a 6.5.  Usually we're able to catch the bad ones before we test.  

 



 

post #7 of 14

Also had three this year,similar instances on two,crap boots on one and crap bindings on the second. The third was self inflicted by the customer(who is always correct,right?!!!!!!!)Complained of doing a SUPERMAN out of his bindings and said they were junk. Turns out the front was on10 and the rear was on 2. Averages out to 6,at least that was his philosophy.Occasionally DIY isn't worth it.   Dave

post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 



I actually laughed out loud at that... that dude obviously has no clue about setting DIN (and honestly, it's not rocket science or something).  Either that, or somebody was mad at him and/or trying to play a sick joke.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daveski7 View Post

Also had three this year,similar instances on two,crap boots on one and crap bindings on the second. The third was self inflicted by the customer(who is always correct,right?!!!!!!!)Complained of doing a SUPERMAN out of his bindings and said they were junk. Turns out the front was on10 and the rear was on 2. Averages out to 6,at least that was his philosophy.Occasionally DIY isn't worth it.   Dave

 

post #9 of 14

I had one guy bring in race skis with his rear set 2+ from his front to make sure he didn't pre-release.  Not too terrible, but he hadn't checked his forward pressure so he still pre-released

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daveski7 View Post

Also had three this year,similar instances on two,crap boots on one and crap bindings on the second. The third was self inflicted by the customer(who is always correct,right?!!!!!!!)Complained of doing a SUPERMAN out of his bindings and said they were junk. Turns out the front was on10 and the rear was on 2. Averages out to 6,at least that was his philosophy.Occasionally DIY isn't worth it.   Dave



 

post #10 of 14

RaceDude, I am sure you are familiar with the Marker IPT binding.I also had a guy that thought he was changing the DIN on the back because he wasn't satisfied with an 8 so he turned the flathead screw to the left. As you know, that holds the binding onto the ski,when turned to the right.  Needless to say the bindings slid back and off the ski and he had to go into the shop where he was skiing,not too happy!Another DIY flop.

post #11 of 14

That's almost as good as the teenager who got skis and binding for Christmas (it was either a Volkl or Blizzard, I don't remember which) and he went online to find out how to mount the bindings.  He actually did a pretty good job of it, minus the fact he put them on backwards.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daveski7 View Post

RaceDude, I am sure you are familiar with the Marker IPT binding.I also had a guy that thought he was changing the DIN on the back because he wasn't satisfied with an 8 so he turned the flathead screw to the left. As you know, that holds the binding onto the ski,when turned to the right.  Needless to say the bindings slid back and off the ski and he had to go into the shop where he was skiing,not too happy!Another DIY flop.



 

post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 


Awww, poor kid.  Was the ski a twin-tip, at least?  And were you able to save his skis?

Quote:
Originally Posted by RaceDude View Post

That's almost as good as the teenager who got skis and binding for Christmas (it was either a Volkl or Blizzard, I don't remember which) and he went online to find out how to mount the bindings.  He actually did a pretty good job of it, minus the fact he put them on backwards.



 



 

post #13 of 14

New meaning to the term "riding switch"

post #14 of 14

Yeah I think so.  I'm pretty sure it was some Blizzard twin with the IQ binding (I know it was a system, so he didn't have to drill into the ski) but we managed to unjam the screws and get them back on the right way.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BoredAtBMBW View Post


Awww, poor kid.  Was the ski a twin-tip, at least?  And were you able to save his skis?



 



 

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Remounted heel piece... someone let me know if I effed up.