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Slush...weapon of choice? - Page 2

post #31 of 63

Walt I think you should make "slarve the slush"  your signature!

post #32 of 63
Warm Springtime Slush and Corn Piles are plenty of fun to ski on just about any soft flexing and properly waxed ski.

I personally wouldn't get too hung up on a specific width, but instead would try to pick skis that are well waxed with warm temperature wax and are as soft flexing as possible. In this video from last spring when I was skiing in these conditions at Killington in 80 degree F sunshine on 75mm waisted SOFT Dynastar Legends, I notice that I had frequently dialed up the rotary content of my turns:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zwoRzViCvYI

Not to say that 75mm wide is ideal, but these were the SOFTest flexing set I had with me while visiting friends and I had lots of fun skiing on them and with my friends that day!
post #33 of 63

Call me crazy, but I love slush.  And I ski on relatively skinny skis (beat-up elan magfire 12s, 76mm waist) that get waxed once a season if I'm lucky.

post #34 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post

 

Contrary to what a lot of people are saying above, you don't need a lot of float to ski slush - if it's really wet stuff you don't sink all that much, at least compared to blower. I prefer skinnier skis and longer turn radius for the slush days - my old P50s are the go-to ski on the slush days (and about the only time I use them anymore).  In last season's slush  I preferred them to my Mantras.  YMMV.


 

Unless it's really deep, in which case it's probably time for beers on the deck, I'm with you. I like to ski rather than surf.

 

Although my Mythic Riders would seem to be built for these conditions, I always seem to gravitate back to my Monster 78's.

 

Don't know what it is, but regardless of the ski technology at the time or my ability level, I've always skied slush well. Whatever's wrong with my technique in other conditions seems to lend itself to skiing wet, slushy snow.

 

 

post #35 of 63

I got some practical experience comparing a few skis yesterday in wet/slushy conditions.  Night skiing, but it hit 60 during the day and was still about 50 when I got there at 6PM.

 

I was trying my two new pairs of skis -- Blizzard Magnum 8.7s and Fischer Watea 94s.  Both worked okay.  The Wateas were more fun.  I actually liked the Magnums more in the bumps, but it may just be that I'm not used to the extra length on the Wateas yet.

 

As mentioned above, the wider ski lets you sort of 'surf' the slush a bit more.  More playful, doesn't get bogged down.  The Magnums can power through it, but you've gotta be on top of things and they don't like to drift sideways much at all.

 

I didn't have time to pull out my 72mm Dynastar Contacts... they were pretty good last Easter Sunday at Sunday River when it was over 60, though.  Just don't push 'em sideways in the real dense stuff.

post #36 of 63

I don't have a separate ski for spring stuff (my sally lords do perfectly fine), though I remember my buddy's old super heavyweight volants (circa 1993) being pretty kickass in April conditions.

 

I don't think it's worth it to get a new pair for april though.

 

p.s., Spring is almost the highlight of east coast skiing man- soft bumps and  warm weather!  Get with the program ;) 

 

 

post #37 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

It's all about your skills and nothing about your skis. Hero snow. You're either on 'em or you're a struggling skidder. 


Hey, PBWA, how did you hack into TR15's account?

 

post #38 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by KTXL View Post

 

p.s., Spring is almost the highlight of east coast skiing man- soft bumps and  warm weather!  Get with the program ;) 

 

 



And no crowds :-)

post #39 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Postr. I prefer skinnier skis and longer turn radius for the slush days - my old P50s are the go-to ski on the slush days (and about the only time I use them anymore).  In last season's slush  I preferred them to my Mantras.  YMMV.


Yup.    I'm on de-racified Solly chick-GS skis.   I'm personally convinced that wider = more catch + yankback on water spots because there is simply more contact area and more frontal span.

 

FWIW, I'm using Maplus hard  with a bit of Toko moly underneath...     stuff coarse structure, get a light cross on your linear.

post #40 of 63

Honestly, just rubbing some Toko red on and not even corking it -leaving it bumpy-is much better than doing nothing even better than  running all temp hotwaxed and scraped..

post #41 of 63

IMO this thread is starting to rather strongly tie into the "what is the price of performance" thread.

 

Consider that "ski performance" or "gear performance"  can be very acceptably defined as "making some subset of terrain or conditions more pleasurable or easier to ski".    And we have seen that for cases where terrain+conditions = powder snow, speed, groomers, ice, jumping, bumps       

 

I find it a little odd that we do not currently have "performance in slush" or "performance on refrozen slush (coral reef type)" as acknowledged directions for "improved performance" considering how commonplace both those conditions are.

post #42 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

Walt I think you should make "slarve the slush"  your signature!


I always thought that A-Basin should get together with 7-11 and use the slogan "Ski the Slurpees" in May and June.

 

What kind of ski works reasonably well may depend at least partly on what the snow conditions were before it warmed up, and how warm it gets, etc. Someone pointed out that "slush" and "corn" can be very different animals, although they both happen when the weather gets warm. If the snow was densely packed and frequently skied, the warm weather version will be firmer and easier to ski, although still slow and occasionally grabby. If the snow was looser and softer, the slush will be looser and softer, too, but it's heavy and difficult to move.

 

The denser version can be skied easily on almost anything. You stay on top, but have fewer concerns about speed control. In fact, this is the time to try those bumps you've been avoiding all winter, as long as they were skied enough to get pretty hard before they thawed. Hero snow, as telerod says.

 

The softer variety, however, can be much more difficult, because you may be running a couple or three inches below the surface, and the wet, heavy snow prevents pivoting or skidding at turn initiation. (And whether you like to admit it or not, most skiers throw in a little pivot to start a turn. If every turn was a pure carve, you could ski 4" of goop with a breakable crust on top just fine.) A wider, softer or rockered ski will put you closer to the surface and allow more variation in your turn styles.

 

Tactics are important. Watch the sun, see what softens first, don't ski the frozen death cookies that you'll find all too easily in the morning.
 

I like Mantras (I own a pair), but for some, they might not be the ideal tool in soft glop. They have a full conventional camber and I'm told they're a bit on the stiff side even though I think they have a big sweet spot. But what do I know? They may not work particularly well for you. Or they might be perfect.

 

I've skied Katanas in 6" of fresh snow that was also a little too warm. Not slush, exactly, but Pacific Northwest high-moisture-content goo. They worked very well, although at my weight (165 lb), 183cm Katanas required some power. They are beefy skis.

 

Anyway, corn and slush don't happen that often. (At least, not where I ski.) Run what ya brung, and learn.

post #43 of 63

Richie, the list weapon of choice for slush could be as long as the list of people responding to this thread... But let me tell you:

 

I am a lot lake you, don't like warm weather and have only RACE / SL and GS skis. Last weekend I skied both days and skied a lot actually in temps reaching mid 50"s.. Doing it on race stock SL skis and actually enjoyed every bit of it, besides my feet being soaked.. The key for me was; skis must be allways on edge/much painless and easy going thru  big chunks of soft snow, keeping a little back stance/ not in the back seat but a little back/like in POw.. Still keeping pressure on the boot tongues, but not as much as on hard snow; also keeping your feet equally weighted/not exactly of course  little more on the  outside of course /makes it for easy and relatively fast turns on really soft snow...

 

I had an awesome time and sore legs on the next 2 days.....

post #44 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by garylk View Post

 

Although my Mythic Riders would seem to be built for these conditions, I always seem to gravitate back to my Monster 78's.

 


I love my Mythics in spring conditions.  But then again, I wouldn't be able to compare them to the Monster 78's because I would never ski anything that narrow

 

post #45 of 63

Ski your head monsters.

post #46 of 63

I guess you have more G.N.A.R. points than the rest of us who still feel the need to own a carving ski here in the East!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skimadriver View Post


I love my Mythics in spring conditions.  But then again, I wouldn't be able to compare them to the Monster 78's because I would never ski anything that narrow

 



 

post #47 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeC View Post

I guess you have more G.N.A.R. points than the rest of us who still feel the need to own a carving ski here in the East!
 



 


east is such a large area. there are area that have 200 vertical feet, and areas that have 3000 vertical feet. there are areas with 40 inches of snowfall and areas with 350 inches of snowfall(more than say Vail....)

 

A carving ski at Mad River would be utterly useless really. A narrow waisted soft mid fat but a carving ski for a place with almost no grooming I dont see the point, maybe a bump ski.

 

post #48 of 63

edit: oops, my post was redundant :)

post #49 of 63


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

The warmer/softer the surface the more like this your feet should look..

water+skis.bmp

 

The colder/harder the surface, the more your feet should look like this

img7.gif


cannes-bud-radio.jpg

 

My JJ's slay the slushiest of slushy slush.

 

post #50 of 63

Use extra hard wax and take like an afro comb to it before it drys.  There are places it will stick and the suction will get you like on the flats at the base of Hunter.  For the most part the real enemy is on the flats that don't run off well.

post #51 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post

Use extra hard wax and take like an afro comb to it before it drys.  There are places it will stick and the suction will get you like on the flats at the base of Hunter.  For the most part the real enemy is on the flats that don't run off well.


"Whatcha talkin bout Willis?"

 

post #52 of 63

When you wax ... or is this the "What choo talkin bout" part ... cool.gif

 

Ahem .. when you wax, don't bother with all of that messy crap like buffing or rubbing and besides if you rub too much you can turn an SL into a GS?

 

Anyhoo, do like minimal finish and while the wax is still hot take a coarse comb and run it down the ski.  For a while you will have LESS to worry about.

 

Better to know the hill and suction traps and ride edges.

 

At any rate, you will feel better having tried SOMETHING than done nothing.  If that is any consolation? popcorn.gif

post #53 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post




How can you tell me what something is doing to me?  Are you inside my mind?  Are you experiencing things from my perspective?  Are you even seeing me ski on them?  How about talking about things from your own perspective related to your own experiences rather then projecting your point of view onto someone else?

 

 



YOU KNOW HE CAN!!! What do you think TELE stands for???He is in your head even now sucking out your ski secretes.

Wasn't there a show about that and your head would blow up??

 

post #54 of 63

uote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post

When you wax ... or is this the "What choo talkin bout" part ... cool.gif

 

Ahem .. when you wax, don't bother with all of that messy crap like buffing or rubbing and besides if you rub too much you can turn an SL into a GS?

 

Anyhoo, do like minimal finish and while the wax is still hot take a coarse comb and run it down the ski.  For a while you will have LESS to worry about.


Oh boy, it's the wax can of worms! 

 

Waxing definitely helps. never heard of brushing while the wax is still hot--I believe the wax needs time to bond or set or something like that to get any benefit out of it...? In any case, it's definitely important to scrape and brush. If you have much visible wax on your skis, gunk from the hill will stick to it--and will make your ride much worse than simply not having waxed at all. Plus it's gross when your gear looks like you've skied through some bird nests. 

post #55 of 63

My point is that many people will trade off and look for something to do.  There are always going to be spots on the hill that suck and hold water and I believe Richie referred to getting sucked out of his boots.

 

Like Richie will know what I'm talkin about.  Me an him Jowee and Vinnie take the "Belt Parkway" at Huntah' and right by them condos onna' run out is a flat.  rolleyes.gif

 

On steeper sections, well, they drain so the moisture content is way less.  Separate the two issues.

 

Rough wax will get you through some "suck em' out" stuff.  Don't confuse this with ideal conditions for speed and performance other than those soggy flats.  You are breaking (to a point), the suction on the ski.  Go look a pair of vintage Head or Hart.  They had a groove down the center of the ski, tip to tail.

 

Again, this is Doctor Feelgood nonsense to a point.  Know where the demons are and ride edges.

post #56 of 63

Put some wax on with a bit of flouro in it.

 

Skinnies are fun, but fatter is better in slurpee. 

 

The lower elevation slowdowns are what usually worry me most about the connective tissues. 

 

I had fun last year slapping slush with 55 underfoot.  IMO 110 underfoot makes it less torque and work.

post #57 of 63
Slush steeps are great for trenching. What ever ski you can really handle is fine. Some are better then others, but I've had tons of fun on real deal SL/GS skis as well as fatties. A bar of Ivory soap in your pocket to wax in a rough x pattern every couple of runs work just fine.
post #58 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post


How can you tell me what something is doing to me?  Are you inside my mind?  Are you experiencing things from my perspective?  Are you even seeing me ski on them?  How about talking about things from your own perspective related to your own experiences rather then projecting your point of view onto someone else?

 

 



SMJ, my friend got some S398's this season.  I put a tune on them, and she frickin' loves them on any condition.  Of course she was a good skier prior.  Sounds like you are having the same experience!  Be good!

 

post #59 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post


Oh boy, it's the wax can of worms! 

 

Waxing definitely helps. never heard of brushing while the wax is still hot--I believe the wax needs time to bond or set or something like that to get any benefit out of it...? In any case, it's definitely important to scrape and brush. If you have much visible wax on your skis, gunk from the hill will stick to it--and will make your ride much worse than simply not having waxed at all. Plus it's gross when your gear looks like you've skied through some bird nests. 


     That's true.  If the ski has a base structure for wet snow, and one doesn't clean it out with brushing........well it's not going to run well.  Here is the way I do it.  Not the only way.  Brushing is a progression of brushes, just like edge tuning stones, or sand paper grits.

 


 

 

post #60 of 63

BBQ Brush is good on Slush.

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