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Which New England Ski Resort?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

I am a level 7 (high) - level 8 skier, who normally skis at Okemo.  However, I have been seeing that with the exception of a few tight glades (something that I would prefer shorter skis before doing (150-155s as opposed to the 177s I have now), I can do just about everything and most of it with ease and the same seems to be true at Stratton (though World Cup on an icy day may prove to be too much).  Hence, I need a new mountain that would be good for my ability level, in eastern NY, VT, NH or MA.  Does anyone know a good mountain for me to try and if so, are there any runs in particular there I should make sure to do.

 

Thank you very much in advance.

post #2 of 22

Okemo and Stratton aren't exactly known for their challenging terrain.  What are you looking for?  i.e., steep groomers?  Trees?  Bumps?  A short list:

1) The North Face of Mt. Snow usually has a couple good bump runs on it.  Ripcord is by far the steepest pitch on Mt. Snow, but it's usually solid ice and always bumpy.

2) Magic Mountain (near Stratton).  Skier's right of the chair is (usually) groomed, skier's left is not.  Go anywhere.

3) I'm not a Killington fan, but they do have challenging terrain, especially over on Bear Mountain and the Canyon area.

4) Sugarbush / Mad River Glen / Stowe.  Take your pick.  If you can ski anything on all three mountains with ease, then it's time to, I dunno, take up snowboarding or something.

 

In NH:  Wildcat or Cannon.

 

post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 

Both mountains are pretty easy.

 

Steep groomers are always good and I am still learning bumps (i.e. can do them on days with good or soft conditions) and loose glades.

 

I actually went to Snow today and spent most of my time at the North Face (nothing was too challenging save for Ripcord, which I had to bail out from since it was a sheet of ice (even when it was 50+ degrees).

 

Magic I have been to twice, but I need to go back on a non-powder day (I have a rough time with powder), which I plan to do next year.

 

I went to MRG a week ago and it was incredible (best snow I have had in aeons), though a bit on the far side.  Never made it to Sugarbush/Stowe/Jay, though I would like to.

 

Killington is one that I would like to pull off this year.

 

Have you been to the others in Upstate NY (Whiteface and Gore)?

 

Thanks for the advice.

post #4 of 22

The two mountains I know best are Stowe and Cannon.  Hayride, Nosedive and Liftline at Stowe are all (usually) groomed and have various pitches of varying steepness and length.  A lot of Cannon is usually groomed out, and they have various steep-ish trails, especially four of their Front Five.  (Stowe has the Front Four, Cannon has the Front Five).  Cannon will teach you a thing or two about skiing on ice.  Stowe is more reliable in the "good conditions" department.  Both mountains will teach you a lot about how to stay warm.  wink.gif

 

I haven't skied in NY in a very long time.

post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 

Thanks a lot.  Stowe I heard some good things about the front four while perusing the hardest trail in the east thread, so that will be a goal for next year.

 

Cannon I knew next to nothing about (I only skied Sunapee in NH), so that is definitely a place I would like to look at for next year.

post #6 of 22

 Hunter provides some very steep terrain for the Catskills. Lower K27 is one of the steepest runs I've seen in the East, although very short, and the entire West Face is some of the best bumps in the East with continuous bumps all the way down.

 

Gore's top area provides some good steeps. The Rumor and The Lies are very steep, the Rumor being a longer version of Lower K27 @ Hunter and the Lies being a longer version of Ripcord @ Mount Snow.

 

Whiteface provides some of the best sustained steeps in the East. Although lacking bumps, the Olympic trails drop 1500 or so vertical down to the midway (still another 1500 vertical to go to the base) of continous groomed steeps, the steepest and longest groomers I've seen in the East. The Slides, if your lucky and their open, are by and far the hardest marked "runs" in the East.

 

Jay Peak has some steep stuff spread throughout the mountain in its plentiful glades. The Ridge area has the steepest pitches I've seen in the East, although off the map. The Face Chutes and Tuckerman's drop from the summit and both have some of the most technical sections I've seen on marked trails in the East with some real no fall zones. For example, the Face Chutes requires the navigating of some 20+ foot cliffs on 35 degree and narrow pitches. Everglades and Staircase are long glades with steep top parts, and Deliverance is probably the hardest glade on the mountain, starting off with a long and steep 8-10 feet wide chute into a bunch of trees.

post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiking4 View Post

 Hunter provides some very steep terrain for the Catskills. Lower K27 is one of the steepest runs I've seen in the East, although very short, and the entire West Face is some of the best bumps in the East with continuous bumps all the way down.

 

Gore's top area provides some good steeps. The Rumor and The Lies are very steep, the Rumor being a longer version of Lower K27 @ Hunter and the Lies being a longer version of Ripcord @ Mount Snow.

 

Whiteface provides some of the best sustained steeps in the East. Although lacking bumps, the Olympic trails drop 1500 or so vertical down to the midway (still another 1500 vertical to go to the base) of continous groomed steeps, the steepest and longest groomers I've seen in the East. The Slides, if your lucky and their open, are by and far the hardest marked "runs" in the East.

 

Jay Peak has some steep stuff spread throughout the mountain in its plentiful glades. The Ridge area has the steepest pitches I've seen in the East, although off the map. The Face Chutes and Tuckerman's drop from the summit and both have some of the most technical sections I've seen on marked trails in the East with some real no fall zones. For example, the Face Chutes requires the navigating of some 20+ foot cliffs on 35 degree and narrow pitches. Everglades and Staircase are long glades with steep top parts, and Deliverance is probably the hardest glade on the mountain, starting off with a long and steep 8-10 feet wide chute into a bunch of trees.



I went to Hunter twice this year and did Annapurna and Clair's Way (the latter with snow being blown on it the first day, while dragging my friend who is an intermeediate skier down it).  Westway was never open and Lower K-27 scared the crap out of me.

 

I need to make it to Gore and want to do Rumor or Lies (if they are groomed), and same with Whiteface (meant to make it to both this year).

 

Jay seems like a place I should go, though that stuff sounds a bit hairy, as my tree skiing is not that good yet (though I heard it is a great place to learn trees).

post #8 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiking4 View Post

 Hunter provides some very steep terrain for the Catskills. Lower K27 is one of the steepest runs I've seen in the East, although very short, and the entire West Face is some of the best bumps in the East with continuous bumps all the way down.

 

Gore's top area provides some good steeps. The Rumor and The Lies are very steep, the Rumor being a longer version of Lower K27 @ Hunter and the Lies being a longer version of Ripcord @ Mount Snow.

 

Whiteface provides some of the best sustained steeps in the East. Although lacking bumps, the Olympic trails drop 1500 or so vertical down to the midway (still another 1500 vertical to go to the base) of continous groomed steeps, the steepest and longest groomers I've seen in the East. The Slides, if your lucky and their open, are by and far the hardest marked "runs" in the East.

 

Jay Peak has some steep stuff spread throughout the mountain in its plentiful glades. The Ridge area has the steepest pitches I've seen in the East, although off the map. The Face Chutes and Tuckerman's drop from the summit and both have some of the most technical sections I've seen on marked trails in the East with some real no fall zones. For example, the Face Chutes requires the navigating of some 20+ foot cliffs on 35 degree and narrow pitches. Everglades and Staircase are long glades with steep top parts, and Deliverance is probably the hardest glade on the mountain, starting off with a long and steep 8-10 feet wide chute into a bunch of trees.



I went to Hunter twice this year and did Annapurna and Clair's Way (the latter with snow being blown on it the first day, while dragging my friend who is an intermeediate skier down it).  Westway was never open and Lower K-27 scared the crap out of me.

 

I need to make it to Gore and want to do Rumor or Lies (if they are groomed), and same with Whiteface (meant to make it to both this year).

 

Jay seems like a place I should go, though that stuff sounds a bit hairy, as my tree skiing is not that good yet (though I heard it is a great place to learn trees).

post #9 of 22

I think Sugarbush and Stowe are the best mountains in New England.  Some prefer Jay Peak, but except for the glades it can be very icy and cold.  Sugarloaf and Sunday River (in Maine) round out the list.

 

If I could only ski one Eastern mountain it would be Sugarbush or Stowe.

post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wraith View Post

I am a level 7 (high) - level 8 skier, who normally skis at Okemo.  However, I have been seeing that with the exception of a few tight glades (something that I would prefer shorter skis before doing (150-155s as opposed to the 177s I have now), I can do just about everything and most of it with ease and the same seems to be true at Stratton (though World Cup on an icy day may prove to be too much).  Hence, I need a new mountain that would be good for my ability level, in eastern NY, VT, NH or MA.  Does anyone know a good mountain for me to try and if so, are there any runs in particular there I should make sure to do.

 

Thank you very much in advance.


 

On a vacation east in February I skied at Jay Peak, Stowe and Sugarbush in VT and Sugarloaf in Maine, all very nice mountains. Try Jay, good steeps and great glades and trees, but get a realistic grip on your ability, level 8's don't bail out on any in bound terrain in VT or NY. Also, where I ski in New Mexico we love our tree skiing and I have never heard that skiing in the trees on 150 or 155 CM skis is even a remotely good idea. 

 

post #11 of 22

If you get up to Cannon make a weekend out of it and also go to Wildcat.  I think Wildcat would fit your ability level to a tee.  It has some long and fairly steep groomers, some moderate angle bump runs, some upper intermediate glades, and the best scenery in the East.  It's usually not too crowded either, but try to pick a day when weather/temps are reasonable because staring Mt. Washington in the face can be harsh.tongue.gif

post #12 of 22

My vote for the east's most technically demanding in-bounds run is the Madonna lift line at Smuggler's.  If you're in the mood to be challenged, you should really give it a shot.  

 

But if you're at Okemo already, you can head to Killy and try Anarchy, Julio, Devil's Fiddle (but don't cheat by going down on skier's left), or Devil's Den.

 

post #13 of 22
Quote:

Originally Posted by skiking4 View Post

Whiteface provides some of the best sustained steeps in the East. Although lacking bumps, the Olympic trails drop 1500 or so vertical down to the midway (still another 1500 vertical to go to the base) of continous groomed steeps, the steepest and longest groomers I've seen in the East. The Slides, if your lucky and their open, are by and far the hardest marked "runs" in the East.

 

Whiteface has some really steep stuff IMO. I have a framed poster that says "Some mountains think our blues are their blacks. That's OK because we thought their greens were the parking lot."

 

biggrin.gif

post #14 of 22

Spend more time away from Okemo and don’t hesitate to take a lesson or two to improve your skills.

 

"....Steep groomers are always good and I am still learning bumps and loose glades”.... “I have a rough time with powder"

 

While you are a "level 7 (high) - level 8 skier” at Okemo,  don’t confuse skiing well on corduroy with the skills required to handle the terrain at many of the mountains that have been suggested here. " at

post #15 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric S View Post




 

On a vacation east in February I skied at Jay Peak, Stowe and Sugarbush in VT and Sugarloaf in Maine, all very nice mountains. Try Jay, good steeps and great glades and trees, but get a realistic grip on your ability, level 8's don't bail out on any in bound terrain in VT or NY. Also, where I ski in New Mexico we love our tree skiing and I have never heard that skiing in the trees on 150 or 155 CM skis is even a remotely good idea. 

 

 

 

The only reason that I put my ability level there (out of the 9 levels) is when I took a lesson earlier this season, that is where the instructor put me, not my own judgment. 

 

The day I went to Hunter, after I took the lesson, K-27 was all crusted over and my skis were not catching an edge on the stuff that was frozen (a hard freeze the previous day).

 

 

post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by WWF-VT View Post

Spend more time away from Okemo and don’t hesitate to take a lesson or two to improve your skills.

 

"....Steep groomers are always good and I am still learning bumps and loose glades”.... “I have a rough time with powder"

 

While you are a "level 7 (high) - level 8 skier” at Okemo,  don’t confuse skiing well on corduroy with the skills required to handle the terrain at many of the mountains that have been suggested here. " at

I have been more and more (though being a grad student means that money is tight, and when you have an SOS pass, it is cheaper to ski there).  Yes, I know Okemo is a very easy mountain and Stratton is not much harder, though next year, I plan to get a second college season pass for some of the other mountains that offer a cheap college pass.

 

Believe me, I know those are two separate sets of skills, and I probably could not do at least fifty percent of the runs suggested (though by the end of next season I would like to be able to do a lot of the ones that I cannot yet), and as I said, that was the instructor's evaluation.

 

 

post #17 of 22
Thread Starter 

Also, thanks to everyone here, I have a good idea of where I should try to make it to next year.  Even though some of the runs sound as of now out of my ability range, there should still be enough runs that are hairy that I could do that would challenge me.

post #18 of 22
Thread Starter 

Also, the only reason I put myself at that level, is that that is what an instructor classified me as when I took a lesson earlier this year (it is out of the 9 level scale, not eight).  I thought shorter skis would help in trees since the turning radius would be smaller which should help in naviagting tight trees.

post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wraith View Post





I went to Hunter twice this year and did Annapurna and Clair's Way (the latter with snow being blown on it the first day, while dragging my friend who is an intermeediate skier down it).  Westway was never open and Lower K-27 scared the crap out of me.

 

I need to make it to Gore and want to do Rumor or Lies (if they are groomed), and same with Whiteface (meant to make it to both this year).

 

Jay seems like a place I should go, though that stuff sounds a bit hairy, as my tree skiing is not that good yet (though I heard it is a great place to learn trees).



Westway is usually never open, except for that big storm once a year (not this year though). Lower K27 scares most people, due to the steep initial drop of around or close to 40 degrees that's the steepest pitch on the mountain and how you can look from the top of the trail all the way down to the bottom with massive moguls. Annapurna can have some of the best bump skiing on the mountain if they let it bump up. Claire's Way is often a sheet of ice, but I heard in the spring or after new snow, it rocks.

 

Rumor is never groomed. Lies is sometimes groomed. Usually, you'll slide a while on either of them if you fall.

 

Jay is an extremely challenging mountain, by Eastern standards of course. Some super tight chutes and trees there on steep pitches all over the mountain. I personally loved Jay, but I just wish that there was more snow like there usually is so I could ski its iconic ridge.

post #20 of 22
Thread Starter 

Yea, I did Claire's Way twice this year (once bringing my friend, who is an intermediate skier, down it with entertaining results (though I thought it was a single diamond)).  The first time they were blowing snow on it so it skied great, but the second time it really was a sheet of ice.

 

Just as a quick question, since as I said, I usually ski Okemo, what are the steepest trails there (guessing the top of Big Bang, maybe Black Hole, bottom of Defiance or the pitch on Double Diamond/Outrage)?

post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by RossiGuy View Post



Whiteface has some really steep stuff IMO. I have a framed poster that says "Some mountains think our blues are their blacks. That's OK because we thought their greens were the parking lot."

 

biggrin.gif


LMAO ROTF.gif

 

post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wraith View Post

Also, the only reason I put myself at that level, is that that is what an instructor classified me as when I took a lesson earlier this year (it is out of the 9 level scale, not eight).  I thought shorter skis would help in trees since the turning radius would be smaller which should help in naviagting tight trees.



a smaller turn radius actually make the types of turns required to be done in the trees much more difficult as there is more of rotary compon.ent and turn radius is more about how the ski turns when ever the ski is carving or close to carving. Also shorter skis tend to sink in soft snow which is quite often what is in trees. My favorite skis to ski tree with have no less than a 18 meter sidecut and no less than a 177cm in lenght, and when it snow I use a ski that has 26 meter sidecut a 183cm.

 

the only reason I post is to dispell the myth that  really tight turn radius are good in bumps and trees because they are not. As well as skiing stoopid short skis.

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