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Rex Fluor Base Oil

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Has anyone tried this Base oil by Rex?

 

http://rex.fi/en/waxing-info/instructions-for-products/rex-base-oil/ 

 

One treatment with base oil and paraffin is equal to 2-3 wax treatments  ? Hard to believe.

 

Cheers.

post #2 of 16

 

The process described by Rex sounds very similar to the Felix process as described by Zardoz.

 

Compare:

 

http://rex.fi/en/waxing-info/instructions-for-products/rex-base-oil/

 

to

 

http://www.zardoznotwax.com/what-is-notwax/waxing-techniques.php

post #3 of 16

and Zardoz is pretty much the worse thing you can put on your base... so I wouldn't use it

post #4 of 16

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RaceDude View Post

and Zardoz is pretty much the worse thing you can put on your base... so I wouldn't use it

 

On what basis do you make this claim?

 

Bonus points for not using any form of the words "oxidize" or "pores" in your answer.

 

 

 

post #5 of 16

Theres about a millions and a half threads on it already http://www.epicski.com/search.php?search=Zardoz+

and the overall feel is that it works ok when layered with normal waxes, but applying directly to your base isn't too good.

 

BONUS POINTS CLAIMED biggrin.gif

post #6 of 16

No points awarded. Anyone can enter a search term and post a list of threads. I'm pretty sure I read most of them way back when. And I'm pretty sure most of the critics were spouting mythology. I have no critters in this hunt, but it seems to me that if you are going to state a product is "pretty much the worse thing you can put on your base", you should be able to state why. Or link to a specific credible thread/post...

 

 

post #7 of 16

Well the main thing is that it dries out the base.  There's lots of chemistry stuff that I'm not 100% sure about, and don't want to sound stupider than I already do, so I won't even try to explain it.  From my understanding the liquid NOTwax stuff clogs up the base and dries it out so that new wax needs to be applied frequently.  From what I've heard, after prolonged use a stone grind may be necessary to re-structure the base.  

Though I haven't used it myself, others who I trust have told me some pretty nasty stories of what it will do when it is applied alone to bases.

 

Bonus points yet? rolleyes.gif

post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 

So, Gents, you are saying this Rex product is similar (if not the same) to Zardoz's. And I ought to stick to traditional waxing.

post #9 of 16

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RaceDude View Post

Well the main thing is that it dries out the base.  There's lots of chemistry stuff that I'm not 100% sure about, and don't want to sound stupider than I already do, so I won't even try to explain it.  From my understanding the liquid NOTwax stuff clogs up the base and dries it out so that new wax needs to be applied frequently.  From what I've heard, after prolonged use a stone grind may be necessary to re-structure the base.  

Though I haven't used it myself, others who I trust have told me some pretty nasty stories of what it will do when it is applied alone to bases.

 

Bonus points yet? rolleyes.gif


 

No points yet (at least not from me biggrin.gif). Maybe a bit OT wrt to the product the thread started about, but bases can not dry out. Period. Look up UHMWPE (the stuff bases are made of). Look up the pressures under which it is typically sintered. It is one of the least reactive materials you will ever find. It can not absorb water, or much of anything else for that matter. Simply put, it can not dry out.

 

In fact it is not clear it has pores the way most folks think of pores. And while I do not doubt the efficacy of waxing under many conditions(because you can empirically feel it), it is not at all clear the religion of pores is a model that reflects reality.

 

Also, Zardoz is incredibly non-reactive. So I'm none too sure what nasty things it could do when slathered on another amazingly non-reactive material. But maybe I am missing something.

 

So other than myths about "drying out" bases, what reports have you heard from people you trust?

 

I have no idea whether any of this applies or does not apply to the product the thread is about....

post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post

 


 

No points yet (at least not from me biggrin.gif). Maybe a bit OT wrt to the product the thread started about, but bases can not dry out. Period. Look up UHMWPE (the stuff bases are made of). Look up the pressures under which it is typically sintered. It is one of the least reactive materials you will ever find. It can not absorb water, or much of anything else for that matter. Simply put, it can not dry out.

 

In fact it is not clear it has pores the way most folks think of pores. And while I do not doubt the efficacy of waxing under many conditions(because you can empirically feel it), it is not at all clear the religion of pores is a model that reflects reality.

 

Also, Zardoz is incredibly non-reactive. So I'm none too sure what nasty things it could do when slathered on another amazingly non-reactive material. But maybe I am missing something.

 

So other than myths about "drying out" bases, what reports have you heard from people you trust?

 

I have no idea whether any of this applies or does not apply to the product the thread is about....


I, too, don't believe it will dry out the base. In any case, I am seeking opinion on the Rex product, not the Zardoz.

 

The statement made by the manufacturer, Rex, that "One treatment with base oil and paraffin is equal to 2-3 wax treatments" - that I have my doubt.   -- -

 

post #11 of 16

I'm not an expert on either of these, but I don't think any of this has anything to do with reactivity.  What I understand from Zardoz is that it is so chemically different than wax that it creates a block in your base that causes it to become unreceptive to the addition of wax.  It is the "crack" of ski wax.  Once you use it you can't use anything else and nothing else will make your ski go except Zardoz; that's why it's users swear by it.  The "drying out" aspect has nothing to do with the base material literally drying out, it means the reservoir of lubricant (Zardoz or regular wax) is depleted and you need to reload.  Again, I say all of this from second hand knowledge of the experiences of many.  This is why I don't "deal" the stuff (pun intended).

 

From the description I think the Rex oil could be different.  It seems like the intent is to make the base more receptive to wax, so I base my assumption on the stated intent.  To improve the base reservoir of wax we encourage multiple waxings with a warm/soft/lighter wax to exploit its penetrating abilities and make the base more receptive to the wax we intend to add and ski on.  It could be that this product is intended to deeply penetrate the base for that reason.  However, as an oil it would not be beneficial to use it alone because it would be drawn out too fast, so you would want to wax over it maybe a few times to allow the wax to displace the oil.  However, if it is some pure fluoro chemical like Zardoz then I take all of this back.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post

 

Also, Zardoz is incredibly non-reactive. So I'm none too sure what nasty things it could do when slathered on another amazingly non-reactive material. But maybe I am missing something.


 

post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaceDude View Post

Theres about a millions and a half threads on it already http://www.epicski.com/search.php?search=Zardoz+

and the overall feel is that it works ok when layered with normal waxes, but applying directly to your base isn't too good.

 

BONUS POINTS CLAIMED biggrin.gif


Wow.
Just stumbled on this threat.
Years ago I found that the best use for Zardoz was when buffing the wax after it was applied.
Almost useless directly on the base without wax.
When I ran out of the stuff, didn't bother buying any more.
post #13 of 16

I've used the Rex oil, and no bad experiences so far. I tend to use it when the skis come back fresh from a grind, or if I've hotscraped/base-cleaned them. The Rex oil is just that, a fairly heavy oil that you can spread and spread. Having applied it, I'll leave the skis base up for a day or two, wipe off excess, and if I'm being good I'll repeat the process. This is instead of trying to saturate the base with 8-10 layers of soft wax.

 

Once the Rex oil has worked its way in I just wax as normal. First time round I was skeptical about the way the oil would react with regular hydrocarbon wax - its a non-issue. Scrape and brush and go skiing.

 

Whether its better than anything else I wouldn't really know - it just seems to work, and it saves me some time working on fresh skis. My lad hasn't complained about slow SG skis, but at 9 y.o. his technique is more of an issue than the base prep. wink.gif


Edited by Squawker - 3/18/11 at 10:57pm
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 

Squawker, Thanks.

post #15 of 16

I won a wax kit by a new manufacturer who's system uses an oil and wax.   I tried it out, seemed to work as well as any wax, but I did not find the process any easier, and I am a little skeptical as to how well my bases really got coated since the system does not make use of an iron.  My skis are always extremely well tuned and waxed so the results from this system were not "pure" since I undoubtedly still had wax in the bases from previous tuning.

 

Check it out:

 

http://sskiwax.com/index.php

post #16 of 16
Sounds like "Snake Oil".
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