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post #1 of 10
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Edited by comprex - 4/19/11 at 3:49pm
post #2 of 10

If I understand your question then no.  Although it was about that time that a young Italian by the name of Alberto Tomba burst on to the WC with a much more "square" stance then others.  So the outside hip starting coming forward relative to back, but still not ahead of the inside.  But by the time this filtered down into the massess was the late 80s/early 90s...if I recall correctly.


Edited by Skidude72 - 3/14/11 at 4:40pm
post #3 of 10

If I also understand the question right; certainly not!

 

Skifahren ist ein beinenspiel; as they say in Austria.

Skiing is a play of your legs.

Movement is started from your ankles and not from the hip.

post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirksuchy View Post

If I also understand the question right; certainly not!

 

Skifahren ist ein beinenspiel; as they say in Austria.

Skiing is a play of your legs.

Movement is started from your ankles and not from the hip.


You make a falce assumption. There is no reference to the ankles in your translation. Only to the legs.
 

 

post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post




You make a falce assumption. There is no reference to the ankles in your translation. Only to the legs.
 

 

 

I know there is no reference to the ankles in the translation (I am German so I speak it very well smile.gif). I just want to be even more specific than "the legs".

 

 

post #6 of 10

The 1985-86 season was the one in which PSIA's Alpine Team (new name for Demo Team) introduced the concept of early weight transfer, where the "up" was included in the weight transfer to the new outside ski.  In effect, the new INSIDE hip would tend to come forward with that move.

 

Prior approach was to use the OLD OUTSIDE SKI as a platform off which one moved up and forward, releasing weight from the skis and allowing a pivoting movement toward the turn.

post #7 of 10
Is that where the 'move uphill to turn downhill' started?

I've seen video from the 70's where skiers seemed to 'pop' outward/away from the hill in order to start the new turn but they didn't actually move uphill, just away from the hill.

.ma
post #8 of 10

Interesting topic. Too bad the original poster has not commented on any of the feedback sofar. I think that its important to understand "why" up-unweight in the first place. The reason for up-unweighting is that you are able to initiate a skid angle. The more forward your outside hip is in ref to your inside hip the more "square" your stance. And the more square your stance the less edge angles you have. This is often refered to as "rotation" or more specific "hip rotation". Or the hip rotating outwards. The opposite of "counter rotation". Rotation causes your ski tails to skid more than if you counter because your edge angles are smaller. This is the reason why so many people ski with rotation. Its easier to slip into a skid angle and turn the skis the other way. Its sort of the most natural way.

 

 

 

post #9 of 10



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dirksuchy View Post



 

I know there is no reference to the ankles in the translation (I am German so I speak it very well smile.gif). I just want to be even more specific than "the legs".

 

 



Im not german speaking but understand some of it. I dont recall ever hearing in austrian ski instruction any reference to the ancle. Legs yes, but ancle no.

 

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post


Im not german speaking but understand some of it. I dont recall ever hearing in austrian ski instruction any reference to the ancle. Legs yes, but ancle no.

 

 

They should...

smile.gif

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