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Volkl Kendo's too much for beginner coming from snowboarding?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hey Guys,

 

First post/novel here.  So after snowboarding for 8 years including hardboot snowboarding (picture hard carving), I'm sick of expending 2-3x the effort to do moguls that skiiers do.  I'm going to make the jump.  

 

That said, I'd rather spend more money now to avoid throwing away gear later. After about an hour trying on boots with my surefoot footbeds (yeah, even as a snowboarder I have those), I found a pair I think will work very very well for me.  

 

So my stats:

I weigh about 175, 6' tall, 29 years old

I live in Colorado.

I can take unlimited lessons at keystone (which I will begin ASAP)

I'm willing to sacrafice some comfort and ease of learning to avoid wasting gear.  

I want to learn to carve hard on skis - I see guys high up on edge and it looks pretty cool.  I don't want to have to buy specific carving skis though.  

I want to do trees and moguls with more agility than my board, but this might be a few seasons.  

Almost all my snowboards are pretty stiff.  

I don't do jumps, pipes, rails, ride backwards, do any of the "traditional" snowboarding kinda stuff (i.e - I'm polite)

 

I actually picked up a pair of 170 '11 kendos for 375 that came with a 25 dollar sports authority gift card.  However, I still need to get bindings and get them mounted.  So before I take steps that will make these skis unreturnable, I wanted to ask you guys what you think. 

 

Everything I read about the kendos says they are better on groomers than powder, but that's fine...I can board on big powder days.  I don't expect to do heavy off piste stuff for a few years either.  So is this a good fit to get started?  

 

Thanks in advance for the advice! 

post #2 of 12

I think the Kendos will be pretty good for what you want.  Especially in the 170 length.  I say get those babies mounted up and go for it. It's not really a slalom ski, but will carve nice GS turns and be good in the trees too.

post #3 of 12

You will be able to handle the Kendos, but they'll be a bit stiff for you early on while you are learning.  

 

Unlike mcross, I think that the 170 will be a bit short for you after a season or two.  These skis have a raised tail and will ski a bit shorter than 170.  They'll be good but will likely feel a bit short after you learn to carve them.

 

If you're planning on upgrading after a couple of years then you should have no concerns about the shorter ski.

 

Good luck,
Mike
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcross View Post

I think the Kendos will be pretty good for what you want.  Especially in the 170 length.  I say get those babies mounted up and go for it. It's not really a slalom ski, but will carve nice GS turns and be good in the trees too.



 

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

Interesting.  I think that I'm already pushing a little bit by getting these skis instead of something more beginner focused, and I'd be nervous about getting something too long.  No need to make learning BRUTALLY hard.  

 

I'd be ok swapping setups in like 3 years (plus they didn't have anythign longer than 170's), so I think I'll stick with it.

 

I'm thinking of pairing these bindings with it too.  Reasonably priced, but I'm not going to be sacraficing safety or anything by cheaping out here am I?  At some point, yes, full upgrade will probably be warranted.  

 

http://www.levelninesports.com/Head-Mojo-11-Ski-Bindings-W-Wide-Brake-Matte-Blacksilver

 

EDIT:  Nevermind - 88mm Brake with a 88mm width.  Should have looked closer.  


Edited by astan100 - 3/14/11 at 11:38am
post #5 of 12

You'll be fine on the 170's for now.  Just ski and have fun!

 

You might want to think about spending the extra $30 and getting the Mojo 12 instead of the 11.  The 12 has the full package of release features and should last longer than the 11.  The 12 will also be more attractive to buyers when you want to resell the skis in a couple of years.

 

Mike
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by astan100 View Post

Interesting.  I think that I'm already pushing a little bit by getting these skis instead of something more beginner focused, and I'd be nervous about getting something too long.  No need to make learning BRUTALLY hard.  

 

I'd be ok swapping setups in like 3 years (plus they didn't have anythign longer than 170's), so I think I'll stick with it.

 

I'm thinking of pairing these bindings with it too.  Reasonably priced, but I'm not going to be sacraficing safety or anything by cheaping out here am I?  At some point, yes, full upgrade will probably be warranted.  

 

http://www.levelninesports.com/Head-Mojo-11-Ski-Bindings-W-Wide-Brake-Matte-Blacksilver

 

EDIT:  Nevermind - 88mm Brake with a 88mm width.  Should have looked closer.  



 

post #6 of 12

Like you I walked into Sports Authority and couldn't resist the price, found them online for $450+ but grabbed some for $375 in the 184 length, I paired them up with a set of Marker Griffin bindings at SA for $165 (sale runs till end of month). I'm also new to skiing and after two weeks on some Elan magfire 78ti skis in 176 length I was ready to try something a little bigger. Unlike you I wasn't on the snow at all before starting. From my experience skiing is pretty easy to get started and pick up enough to enjoy, then a challenge to get great on. I'll be breaking them in tomorrow at breck. I'll let you know what I think. I hear there stiff, but am hoping that being 6'3'' and 225lbs will help,  I don't think that will be a big deal. Plus with your ability to get lessons you'll progress fast. 

post #7 of 12

The Kendo is a beefy ski that rewards good input and will surely and swiftly punish bad input. You need to stay on top of them and drive them through the turn.  No wimpy skiers need apply.

 

I wouldn't recommend the Kendo for a beginner, but given your history as a strong aggressive snowboarder and your commitment to work hard and take lessons you'll probably be up to speed on the Kendos before too long.  If you've never actually been on skis before you might think about renting a pair of noodles for your first lesson or two, but otherwise you'll grow into this ski.

 

My main take on the Kendo is that it is very like its big brother the Mantra.  I didn't find the Kendo to be  easier to ski, more forgiving, better at carving the groomed, or faster edge-to-edge than the Mantra.  So I'd say if you're looking at the Kendo, just get the wider Mantra and be done with it.  But that's just my opinion.

 

post #8 of 12

I believe that the Kendo is far more ski than you need at this point. I seldom sell the Kendo to even strong intermediates let alone beginners. Why?...............simply too stiff. The mechanics that you will learn in your lessons will involve learning to edge and bend the ski so it will turn you. There are a dozen skis in this width range that will do this more easily and allow you to progress faster. A stiff ski is less versatile and harder to develop skills on. There is nothing wrong with the length that you have chosen. Anything in the low 170's in a medium flex ski will be OK.

 

So...................CAN you ski it?............yes. SHOULD you ski it?................no.

 

SJ

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post

I believe that the Kendo is far more ski than you need at this point. I seldom sell the Kendo to even strong intermediates let alone beginners. Why?...............simply too stiff. The mechanics that you will learn in your lessons will involve learning to edge and bend the ski so it will turn you. There are a dozen skis in this width range that will do this more easily and allow you to progress faster. A stiff ski is less versatile and harder to develop skills on. There is nothing wrong with the length that you have chosen. Anything in the low 170's in a medium flex ski will be OK.

 

So...................CAN you ski it?............yes. SHOULD you ski it?................no.

 

SJ


Interesting post. I recently bought the Kendos (putting myself through the wringer selecting bindings) after skiing (and loving) them 4 days in Big Sky late last month. They are my first set of skis. I'm relatively new to the sport and still have a lot to learn. I wonder if I've overbought. Guess only time will tell.

 

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenlander View Post


I recently bought the Kendos (putting myself through the wringer selecting bindings) after skiing (and loving) them 4 days in Big Sky late last month. They are my first set of skis. I'm relatively new to the sport and still have a lot to learn. I wonder if I've overbought. Guess only time will tell.

 

If you've already skied on them and loved them, then No: you did not overbuy. If you had hated them, then you might have overbought.
 

 

post #11 of 12

As I wrote above I am also new and just grabbed the Kendo In a 184cm with the Marker Griffin bindings. Took them out to breck. and loved them. On one run I was headed for a pile of snow that had built up, I tightened up like usual and they just blasted through it like it wasn't there. I spent the next few hours hitting every pile I could find. Over the past few months that was was my biggest issue, it seamed liked I was always thrown off balance by anything that wasn't groomed and smooth. With these I was way more confident. I wish I would have started on these. I'll be skiing them again the next three days that I'm off and am sure I'll like them even more.

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hey guys, 

 

As the OP I figured I should come back and tell you how my first two days went.  I got some 12 DIN setting Salomons mounted to the Kendos and some 80 flex Atomic boots (yeah, I went all agressive for a beginning).  I did about 5 hours at keystone on day 1 and then 4 hours at A-basin today.  

 

Overall impressions about skiing - totally different set of muscles and my whole body hurts.  I see why you guys complain about your boots so much :)  

 

My skill development - One of my friends is a ski instructor so he spent the first day with me to make sure I'm doing everything right.  I was skiing mostly parallel by day 1 and starting to feel pretty comfortable by day 2.  I can confidently turn on blue slopes, but I'm incredibly slow still.  I can see how these skis like to carve because if I picked them on edge too much, it was hard to skid them out of it without wiping out.  This is sort of my snowboarding translation of the issue - not sure if it makes sense.  These things do grip nicely even on wind swept, icy garbage.  Overall, the length didn't do me any favors and probably forced me to get parallel faster because any bad turn and  I was running over either the front of the rear of the skis.  So look at it as incentivizing you to ski better.  I think that I'm coming along nicely and never felt at any point that I had too much ski under me.  I could obviously have bought a different ski or beginner ski, but I think that I'm past the worst of this.  I'm going to take a lesson at keystone this coming saturday to speed up my learning curve faster.  

 

 

Problems to look out for if you are a beginner with Kendos - That metal topsheet is EASILY scratched.  I have put some nasty scratches and gouges in my attempts to learn to turn.  Maybe all skis are like this, but I do feel particularly bad about doing it to such an attractive ski.  On the plus side, the silver under metal matches the basic graphic, so it's not as noticeable as it could be.  

 

All in all, I'm pretty happy with my purchase and I'm willing to put the time into growing into both the skis and the sport in general.  Thanks everyone for your tips and ideas.     

 

 

Quick note:  A 90mm brake fits perfectly on these things.  


Edited by astan100 - 3/20/11 at 6:54pm
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