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What did you/I learn this year? - Page 2

post #31 of 42


Not so sure about that. I learned that even a small branch across your face really hurts.  eek.gif
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

I learned that any plants/tree/branches under about 3/4 of inch can be skied though instead of around.

post #32 of 42

This season reaffirmed for me the fact that I hate going to work during the ski season    mad.gif

post #33 of 42

I learned that I can't pass the PSIA Level 2 skiing exam, at least in whiteout blizzard and... um... we'll call it 'variable' snow conditions.  frown.gif

 

I also learned what I need to do before I take the exam again.  The good news is it's related to what I've been working on all season.  The bad news is it's related to what I've been working on all season.

 

Hopefully I'll also be learning how fun it is to spend a week in Summit County in April...

post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post

We want you guys back!  Come again anytime, you guys were good students and fun.  I'd work with you again in a heartbeat.  It's awesome skiing conditions right now!
 



 

Aww, thanks. I am definitely making JHMR a place I'll have to visit AT LEAST once a season. Wish I could be there now for all that awesome recent snowfall you guys have been enjoying.
 

 

post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthias99 View Post

I learned that I can't pass the PSIA Level 2 skiing exam, at least in whiteout blizzard and... um... we'll call it 'variable' snow conditions.  frown.gif

 

I also learned what I need to do before I take the exam again.  The good news is it's related to what I've been working on all season.  The bad news is it's related to what I've been working on all season.

 

Hopefully I'll also be learning how fun it is to spend a week in Summit County in April...


That's too bad. I took my level 2 in similar conditions, and did well, but it knocked a big chunk of candidates out. Don't let it get you down. That was my second time around and I wasn't the only one there a second time.

 

post #36 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthias99 View Post

I learned that I can't pass the PSIA Level 2 skiing exam, at least in whiteout blizzard and... um... we'll call it 'variable' snow conditions.  frown.gif

 

I also learned what I need to do before I take the exam again.  The good news is it's related to what I've been working on all season.  The bad news is it's related to what I've been working on all season.

 

Hopefully I'll also be learning how fun it is to spend a week in Summit County in April...

 

 

I took my L3 in heavy snow that was about 12-16 inches deep. I also choose skis that were advantages for the day. I had by far the widest, longest skis, straightest skis there. Its the Indian not the arrow but a smart Indian chooses the best arrows.
 

 

post #37 of 42

I learned that there's still hope for me despite 8 years of injuries, surgery, crazy new job, and illness.

I learned that at age 52, I've still got it.  Balance, reflexes, muscle memory, athletic ability--it's all still there, just in a deceptively dumpy package.

I learned that it's totally OK to go broke on ski gear to completely outfit myself.  I can always save money biking and car camping over the summer for next year's passes.  But I am not allowed to lose any more weight because more clothes will cost too much.

post #38 of 42

I learned that:

 

I can do bumps (something I have made a goal for myself the last half decade and never gotten around to it until this year)

Groomers can give you a major adreline rush

That compacting your classes into 27 hours is a brilliant idea (leaving 5 days for skiing)

That I still cannot ski powder.

That I should not leave my boots near the heater before I buckle them up to keep their shape

That the program that I go to really does not have any advanced skiers (they all are novices or will not move off of intermediate terrain).

post #39 of 42

I learned that all the “talk” about boot fitters and good quality, snug fitting boots with custom foot beds really is true.

I learned that good skis aren’t nearly as tiring, are easier to ski, go faster, build confidence, and keep one upright more often than not.

Basically, I learned it pays to invest in quality boots and skis.

 

post #40 of 42

 

Quote:
That's too bad. I took my level 2 in similar conditions, and did well, but it knocked a big chunk of candidates out. Don't let it get you down. That was my second time around and I wasn't the only one there a second time.

A lot of people had issues.  Four people from my mountain were taking the skiing portion and only one passed.  I was actually in a pretty strong group (5 of 8 passed, I think overall was under 50%) -- not sure if maybe that hurt me a bit.  I felt like I was pretty consistent from session to session, but I was never totally comfortable.  I also had a painful crash on the first day when I hooked a ski at speed in a snowdrift during a free run, which didn't help my comfort level.

 

I certainly got a much better idea of what they want to see in terms of personal skiing.

 

Quote:
I took my L3 in heavy snow that was about 12-16 inches deep. I also choose skis that were advantages for the day. I had by far the widest, longest skis, straightest skis there. Its the Indian not the arrow but a smart Indian chooses the best arrows.

I actually considered going to the demo shop at lunch on the first day, but decided I was better off toughing it out on the skis I had been practicing on all season than trying to adapt to something I'd never been on before during the exam.  By next season I'll have enough experience on my new 8.7 Magnums to use those if the conditions warrant something wider... I didn't bring them because I've literally skied about three runs on them, and not in those conditions.

post #41 of 42

I think that the conditions actually helped me. I was far more used to skiing deep snow and whiteout conditions than anyone else, which put me at ease and at an advantage. I brought my carvers and my midfats, and used the midfats. That was also to my advantage, as I rarely ever get the carvers out. Especially in a year like this one.

post #42 of 42

I learned that although there are "horses for courses" when it comes to skis, that frame of mind can be just as important if not more. On the occasions where I have made a poor run and found myself thinking "damn, I wish these were a little longer/shorter/stiffer/softer so I could ski this stuff" I have made a conscious effort to go back and ski it again, and again until I get it down... more often than not, with a good deal of success. Then if I do show up someday on that same type of run with the absolute correct tool, it will only be that much easier.


 

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