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100-year-old skier at peak performance

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Great piece on CBS Sunday Morning today...

 

At 100 years old Lou Batori is still skiing -- and still ski racing -- and he has no plans to stop. Bill Geist caught up with Lou on the slopes of the annual gathering of Midwest chapter of the 70+ ski club in Nubs Nob, Michigan and watched as he hit the racecourse.


Click here to watch the video.
post #2 of 21

That's just great stuff. Inspirational for sure.

post #3 of 21

Waaaay beyond inspirational - down right phreakish!  As one who's entering that golden realm (60) and finding myself stiff, grumbling and cranky getting up in the mourning (pun intended), I've been trying to find the Devil to make a little deal - any body know his current whereabouts?

post #4 of 21

There are a lot more older folks out skiing than many may realise. My dad is still skiing at 88 and is often not the oldest in the lodge...

post #5 of 21

There's a 90-something guy who I see on the hill sometimes.  He still tunes his own skis too!

post #6 of 21

What a great story! The guy doesn't look a day over, well, I don't know--but I've seen older looking and older sounding people who are a whole lot younger than Lou Batori! 

 

Apparently there is another centenarian who lives in Glenwood Springs, Colorado, and skis at nearby Sunlight. I don't know his name, but someone told me about him last fall. I'm told that he also races. On top of that, rumor has it that he rides a snowboard sometimes too, and inline skates in the summer. The story I was told was that he skates in the parking lot of the local hospital...just in case. Can anyone confirm this story?

 

These guys are among my heroes. As long as you're learning, you're never old.

 

Best regards,

Bob

post #7 of 21

That's not just amazing, its absolutely mind-blowing.

It just defies what is possible for most human beings.

post #8 of 21

jc-ski, you post a lot of great stuff - thanks for sharing your finds!

post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 

Thx, I'm glad you (and others) enjoyed it.

 

Since a lot of use here are, shall we simply say, on the other side of 40, I figure we can appreciate how fast it all goes by, and probably feel sometimes like our best years are behind us. Given that it's always great to come across someone a little (or a lot!) farther down the road who's still using the gift of life to the fullest by living!!

 

> That's not just amazing, its absolutely mind-blowing.

> It just defies what is possible for most human beings.

 

What's possible has a lot to do with attitude, and in that respect our new friend Lou is one helluva great role model!

post #10 of 21

Wow, I can't believe it. Wouldn't it be great if we could all make it there? And the dude still drives a motorcycle and bikes every day! Thanks JC!

post #11 of 21

At Dodge Ridge last year we had an instructor, who was 87.

 

At the 2010 senior games we had a 92 year old guy who finished first in his class.

 

This all happened in 2010. As medical science marches forward, who knows how it will be in 20 years.

 

I meet this guy on the lift last season. Local. Started skiing at age 65. Was 76, maybe 78 I think. Was telling me how he loved his new Icelandics. So good for tree skiing says he. I believed him. I understand that Icelandics work well in the trees

 

 

 

post #12 of 21

BUMP

 

Happy to find out that Lou Batori is still skiing.  He turned 106 in 2016.  Not skiing as often, but was out on a sunny day at Crystal in MI last week.

 

http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2017/02/106-year-old_skier_an_inspirat.html

post #13 of 21

I'll bet he doesn't have to buy that martini either.

post #14 of 21

4:44  ......... "and you just point the tips and let them run!" :)   What a wonderful story, and seeing the pure joy on his face while talking of skiing.  Wishing bluebird days and wide open corduroy for you Lou!! 

post #15 of 21

That is an inspirational story.  Thanks for the video.

post #16 of 21

Awesome inspiration for the rest of we seniors.

 

Suspect he is another person with the lucky DNA for long telomeres plus has lived a healthy, active life.

 

https://www.verywell.com/understanding-cellular-aging-2224234

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/if-you-want-to-live-longer-take-good-care-of-your-telomeres/2017/01/13/0127ab70-d69d-11e6-b8b2-cb5164beba6b_story.html?utm_term=.c41e6e3c4426

 

This month I retired from my 4+ decade hi tech electronics career and enrolled in full Social Security and Medicare so will have a lot of freedom to ski whenever I want to the rest of this season.  As an old advanced skier am wondering how many more years I can ski at the current high level?  

 

David

post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave_SSS View Post
 

.....

 

This month I retired from my 4+ decade hi tech electronics career and enrolled in full Social Security and Medicare so will have a lot of freedom to ski whenever I want to the rest of this season.  As an old advanced skier am wondering how many more years I can ski at the current high level?  

 

David

 

We all wonder about this, especially when you consciously realize that you'v already had to start dialing it back, shifting emphasis/strategies, etc. It's uniquely different for each of us, both in how your body copes with the long (hopefully) slow slide, and perhaps even more how your mind copes. I think I will always yearn for the mountains in winter (or any season, for that matter) but there may come a time when it's just too painful and frustrating to face the fact that the skills and thrills are long gone. I would hope that we can all respect the choices that each of us make individually. 

post #18 of 21

This is fascinating.  I was at Whistler a few weeks ago and riding up the Harmony lift with two gentlemen from the Seattle area who were asking me if I knew the easiest way down from the top of the lift because one of them was getting tired.  (I told them Pika Traverse, but also cautioned them that they might have to skate/pole to get across some flat stretches.)  They told that would be fine.  The "younger" of the two then mentioned that his friend was 89 and was worried that he might fall since he was getting tired.  I was blown away.  He was twice as old as me...and the Harmony lift isn't exactly a piece of cake to get to in the first place.

post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Lutes View Post

We all wonder about this, especially when you consciously realize that you'v already had to start dialing it back, shifting emphasis/strategies, etc. It's uniquely different for each of us, both in how your body copes with the long (hopefully) slow slide, and perhaps even more how your mind copes. I think I will always yearn for the mountains in winter (or any season, for that matter) but there may come a time when it's just too painful and frustrating to face the fact that the skills and thrills are long gone. I would hope that we can all respect the choices that each of us make individually. 
I've actually started dialing it up, after being out of skiing for a few years. I had not been skiing in about 10 years and went to Vail back in December and assumed I would be limited and only skiing blues. After about an hour I was on double black diamonds again, as if I hadn't missed a season. I have the bug again, headed to Breck in March and accumulating equipment as fast as the wife will allow.
post #20 of 21
See, there is some advantage to being an out of shape desk jockey in middle age! As a better - shape old guy, I am still getting better.
post #21 of 21

One of the reasons I like skiing so much is that I am still getting slowly better at it at 63. Mind you, I had some low hanging fruit to pick. But at this point in time my physical conditioning is not the limiting factor - just all the bad habits that won't go away.

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