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Review: 2012 Rossignol Experience 98

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

 

Title:  So uhhh, Are you Experienced II?

 

 

Length/size Tested: 180

 

Environment of Conditions:

*Location of review: Sugar Bowl

*Runs Taken: 6

*Snow Conditions: Manky/mixed conditions 

*Demo or Purchase: Demo

 

Summery (inc. Strengths & Weaknesses):

 

[copied from E88] Rossignol is back, sure they never really went away but starting about 2 yours ago, Rossi got serious about making skis that ski very well in all categories just look at the magazine tests last year. With Tim Petrick, one of the smartest minds in the industry at the helm, I am expecting nothing from great things in their future. [/copied from E88]

 

Strengths: Power, with Rossi's "Cascade" tip, this ski rocks. The E98, although a quick glance on paper, you would think this is just a 98mm version of the E88, not the case. The 2012 Rossi Experience is a much more powerful football playing ski than it's band camp little brother, the E88. Not that either of these extremes are good or bad, but these skis are totally different. The E98 at 10mm wider in the waist and only 5mm wider in the top and a TR at 20M at 180cm, the dimensions are much more in proportion and balanced. 

 

Weaknesses: Where the E88 is not for the powerful, the E98 is not for the meek, the E98 needs speed to get up and going. The subtle early rise (tip and tail) helps initiation but again the ski does need a bit of speed to come alive. 

 

Other skis considered in class: Kastle BMX98, Blizzard Bonafide, Nordica Enforcer, Line Prophet 98, Volkl Mantra

 

 

 

 

Tester Info:

Age: 47

Height/Weight: 5/10" 188

Average days on snow: 0-10, 11-25, 30+  (pick one)

Years Skiing: 0-5, 6-15, 15+  (pick one)

 
 
post #2 of 20

Phil, thanks for the review.

But using (in this case) Rossi lingo---"Cascade tip" doesn't mean anything.

How about what the "Cascade tip" means?

Thanks.

post #3 of 20

Also Phil,

 

     How does the ski compare to the Kastle (which seems to be a favorite) and "the" ski this year, the Bonifide?

 

  Favorable, unfavorable, or it's a wash...money well spent on any of these choices?

 

-smarty

post #4 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by John J View Post

Phil, thanks for the review.

But using (in this case) Rossi lingo---"Cascade tip" doesn't mean anything.

How about what the "Cascade tip" means?

Thanks.

The Cascade tip is varying layers of metal & fiberglass staggered to make the ski lighter and reduces swing weight. They started this is their GS skis. 
 

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Smartyiak View Post

Also Phil,

 

     How does the ski compare to the Kastle (which seems to be a favorite) and "the" ski this year, the Bonifide?

 

  Favorable, unfavorable, or it's a wash...money well spent on any of these choices?

 

-smarty

All good skis with some different flavors. The E98 vs. the Bonafide, I would say the E98 is a 76/25 frontside traditional over 30 year old skier and the Bonafide is 60/40 backside for a younger market. I honestly don't think they will get cross shopped much. 
 

 

post #5 of 20

Phil,

 

Since you are going to keep reusing this review template I think you mean 'Summary.' Because 'Summery' is an adjective that means 'feels like summer'.

 

Not to be the spelling/word use police, but it's a very fixable problem

 

 

 

post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liam View Post

Phil,

 

Since you are going to keep reusing this review template I think you mean 'Summary.' Because 'Summery' is an adjective that means 'feels like summer'.

 

Not to be the spelling/word use police, but it's a very fixable problem

 

 

 

LOL, I thought it didn't look right but the spell checker didn't catch it....The ski is smooth like a warm summer breeze...
 

 

post #7 of 20

Could you provide a quick comparison to the Nordica Enforcer?

post #8 of 20

 

Phil,
 
I have to choose a rossignol ski for the next season. I've always had slalom skis, for example in the last four years always the newest Radical 9SL Rossi. That's really a great ski, but now I have a feeling, that Experience would be better, mainly because I want an allround ski, not only for groomed snow (maybe 70%), but non-groomed (30%) also. I'm an expert skier, 163cm/72kg. So please help me to decide 98, or 88? (There is no chance to try any of them. I'm not a (very) speedy skier, avarage speed is around 30-40km/h.)
 
Thanks in advance,
Peter

Edited by Peter P - 2/21/12 at 6:51am
post #9 of 20

I'm not Phil, but....  Sounds like you would like the E88 a bit better than the E98.  I demoed both and both are really great skis.  I chose the E98 because with the metal over the Basalt, I felt it was much more powerful and fun to ski on the hard pack that I mostly demoed on.  I did ski the E88 on some proto-bumps and some refrozen crud and it did very well.  I have about 60 days on the E98 and have skied it in almost all conditions now.  I feel like it is a more demanding ski than the E88.  IMO the E98 is not great in bumps, although I do it everyday and it does work, and while it is quick edge to edge for a ski of its size, it doesn't excel at short turns.  It likes to go fast and bust crud and bite into hard pack.  I think the E88 is the more versatile ski and should be better for you if you are coming from a slalom ski and don't necessarily like to go fast.  It sounds like you are a bit smaller than me.  I'm 5'10" 175 lbs and ski the E98 180 pretty comfortably in all conditions.  You might like the E98 172 or a little shorter?  I think the E88 comes in 162, 170, 178.  The women's version, Temptation, is the same ski in shorter lengths with a different top sheet.

post #10 of 20

Thanks! That was my first impression as well. Maybe E88 would be better for me, but Radical 9SL has also a wood fibro/metal core, like E98. I'm 5'4", and 158 lbs. As I could check the new (2012/13) E88 has no basalt layer.

 

And sizes:

 

E88 - 170

E98 - 172

post #11 of 20

So I had a feeling, that E88 is more versatile, but E98 is more powerful. I'm a little bit afraid of E88, because Radical SL9 was powerful exactly as I needed. So maybe E88 is too soft. As well as 15 vs. 18 radius is also a good question. I've never tried 18 before, but it would be a good challange for sure, and perhaps E98 could correct my technic. I don't now...

post #12 of 20

And one more thing. It's much easier to sell the tpx version over open version. Unfortunatelly there is no tpx version of E98. But for me it's worth to sell my skis after the season.

post #13 of 20

I bought this ski at the beginning of this season to be used as my western all mountain ski.  I am 57, 5'9" 190lbs and am a level 8/9 all mountain skier.  I bought the 98 in the 180 length which is Rossi's reccomendation for my weight.  When researching this ski I had read a few reviews that suggested a mounting point behind the mfg mark.  As a way to experiment, I had a Marker Griffon Schizo binding mounted.  The first day I skied them I played around a bit with the binding placement and settled on 15mm (1.5cm) behind the mounting mark and haven't touched it since.

 

I took the ski to Mammoth several weeks ago right after they got a big dump which finally opened up much of the mountain.  By the end of the first day (only 2nd day on the ski) I had this ski figured out and was having a blast.  They were outrageous on fresh groomers going faster than I had ever been comfortable before.  This ski just blasts through minor and medium irregularites in the snow.  They turn much quicker edge to edge than you would expect a ski from a ski of this size.  Firm bumps were not a problem at all, but were a tad stiff for that duty requiring more work than my slalom race skis in a 160 requires, but they worked just fine if you know how to ski bumps.

 

Though fresh snow was non-existant, we did find some nice soft wind blown snow in spots and the 98's showed promise there as well, feeling very secure transitioning between wind blown fluff and wind blown hard pack.  I am looking forward to taking them to Big Sky next month.

 

I hope this helps anyone considering this ski.

 

Rick G

post #14 of 20

Great info, please report back after your Big Sky trip!

post #15 of 20

Thanks Phil. I had a chance to ski this one the other day on groomers. Burly and nimble at the same time, much quicker than you'd expect from the width. Powerful front end, a trencher. Big fun on the corduroy.

post #16 of 20
I purchased the 98 (180 length) this season as my go-to ski for everything except big dump days and have been very pleased. I'm 44, 5'9" 165lbs and prefer a strong carving ski that gives confidence at high speeds.

I live and ski in Utah and have not spent a day on these wishing I was on something else. Perhaps something more nimble for steep bumps, but that's hardly the skis fault - perhaps some gym time would make that better.

It's hard to imagine anyone who isn't spending most of their time in the park not enjoying these - I recommend very highly.
post #17 of 20

Being in Utah I have to assume you have had the chance to ski your 98's in softer snow and perfhaps fresh powder.  How did you like them in those conditions?  How is the float?  What about deep broken snow? 

 

Appreciate any feedback you might have.

 

Rick G

post #18 of 20

Any thoughts on a good binding for the Experience 98 2012s? I'll be buying for my husband, who loves the skis but they're all sold out in local shops pre-mounted with bindings so I'm buying online. He's 6'0 about 180 lbs. and solid Advanced skiier moving to Expert land. Binding recommendations would be appreciated. Thanks!

post #19 of 20

Based on my experience with the Experience 98's,I would reccomend any binding that has the ability to slide forward or backwards so you can fine tune the ski to your style.  As mentioned in an earlier post, I am using Marker Griffon Schizo's which have that ability.  I have them adjusted 1.5CM behind the factory mark.

 

There are other reviews elsewhere in cyber land that supports this opinion on the Rossi E98's.

 

Good luck,

 

Rick G

post #20 of 20

I just rented the E98s for a weekend trip to Salt Lake, and they may be the best all around ski I've tried. Last trip I demoed the K2 Kung Fujas, and found those really versatile for swapping between cut-up powder and groomers, but the E98s did it even better. First day was on 3-day old pow at Powder Mountain, with lots of time in the trees. Great float, responsive turning. The next day was crud and groomers at Snowbird. Flying off a groomer into the cut-up stuff on the sides, no problem...blasted right through it, and stayed right on track.  Final day was all fast groomers at Solitude, and I tried hard and failed to find the speed limit on these things. Even at highest speed GS turns I was capable of (w/ 49 years of skiing under my belt), they were solid and stable. For the one-ski quiver, at least on big western mountains, I have a new love.

 

Appreciate the other recos on binding flexibility. If I invest in a pair of E98s, which seems likely, I'll keep that in mind.

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