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Safety Bar etiquette? - Page 4

post #91 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

Its the weekend. You guys need to go skiing.

 

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^^^That's why I always pull the bar down when riding with anyone wearing nonono2.gifear buds...

 

post #92 of 102

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by joeshoto View Post

Well I usually make a quick assesment of who it is that I will be sharing the ride with.  Are they beginners? Experts? Little kids with dad and dad cant ski? Teenage experts? Not paying attention? A pair of Friends? But then I still cant predict what will happen with the bar.... So, because I like to put my poles under my leg, I just have to catch the bar as it comes down and just say "one moment please" and that's when the fun starts.  The beginners act all embaressed like they did something wrong and apologize with a quick " Doh,sorry" and I grumble "ouch" back. The experts dont care a darn about any stinkin' bar. Dads with kids want to throw down and will wrestle the bar down no matter which appendage or cervical spine they must bruise. Teen experts will sometimes ask if I would like a hit too although that hasnt happened since 1976. And the pair of friends just ignore the bar and the old guy as they ask eachother; "I havent seen Suzie since we skied the Birds of Prey run yesterday in the storm, but that girl laying in the trees down there is wearing a red hat, are you sure she wears a white hat? No that cant be her. 


Is there some sort of award here for "Best First Post"?  If so, this has my nomination and vote.  

 

post #93 of 102

I hate safety bars and the people who automatically lower them.  I'm 6'5" and frequently get hit in the head with it.  Also, if the bar has foot rests...my foot to knee length usually doesn't allow my leg to fit between them, so I'm stuck with the foot rest ON TOP of my boot pushing my leg down, which ultimately hurts the bottom of my leg after a long lift ride.

 

Luckily my local hill only has 1 lift with a safety bar and no foot rests.  My home away from home...Silver Mountain...has VonRoll lifts which happen to have more room between the bar and footrests so I actually fit.  But Dopplemeyer can bite me.

post #94 of 102

I find hate a tough word to share with people trying to feel a bit safer with the exposure you have to deal with on an  open lift. I live in Washington and don't remember seeing any lifts with safety bars growing up though there must be some by now. 

 

Most people don't ever get that feeling in their lives until they do get on a lift and it is a real fear that the safety bar mitigates. Spending time with children makes me wish as a safety representative of my employer for better restraints for little ones. I do fear for the very small and active children . They don't fall often but fall they do and with some terrible consequences of physical and financial injury especially if helicopters become involved in the transport.
 

I use them and don't use them depending on the needs of my chair mates . Understanding they are just trying to feel safer and be safer with their loved ones is a good way to understand their panic sometimes towards getting the bar down.


Edited by GarryZ - 3/14/11 at 12:34pm
post #95 of 102

This past weekend, I had to ski in Western NY due to shit conditions at my local hill (which will not be open any longer this year).  Anyway, like I said the local hill has no bars.  When at Peek n Peak on my first chairlift ride, I was a single and totally forgot about the safety bar until I was 90% of the way up.

 

This is bad desensitization my local hill causes by not having bars.  That's like driving without a seatbelt, and doing it so much you forget to "automatically" buckle it.

post #96 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post

I find hate a tough word to share with people trying to feel a bit safer with the exposure you have to deal with on an  open lift. I live in Washington and don't remember seeing any lifts with safety bars growing up though there must be some by now. 

 

Most people don't ever get that feeling in their lives until they do get on a lift and it is a real fear that the safety bar mitigates. Spending time with children makes me wish as a safety representative of my employer for better restraints for little ones. I do fear for the very small and active children . They don't fall often but fall they do and with some terrible consequences of physical and financial injury especially if helicopters become involved in the transport.
 

I use them and don't use them depending on the needs of my chair mates . Understanding they are just trying to feel safer and be safer with their loved ones is a good way to understand their panic sometimes towards getting the bar down.



Mt. Spokane doesn't have them.

post #97 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post





Mt. Spokane doesn't have them.


I said there are none I know of in Washington unless the newer lift at Crystal does .I haven't  been there recently. Schweitzer does and so many other places. Your point is ???????????

post #98 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluegrin View Post




That's pretty hardcore.  Most people get off the lift and ski in between trips up the mountain, but ten laps in a row is impressive.

 



roflmao.gif

post #99 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post

I hate safety bars and the people who automatically lower them.  I'm 6'5" and frequently get hit in the head with it.  Also, if the bar has foot rests...my foot to knee length usually doesn't allow my leg to fit between them, so I'm stuck with the foot rest ON TOP of my boot pushing my leg down, which ultimately hurts the bottom of my leg after a long lift ride


A small price to pay for being blessed with Adonis DNA and tiger blood.  Seriously though, most experienced skiers are aware that you big'ns don't fit under the bar or over the footrests.  Also, most experienced skiers will ask a boarder which side they prefer when loading a chair.  Being considerate goes a long ways indeed.  That is why I was sure to quality "normal sized people" in my posts about sitting properly.  Still, don't be hatin' in the ignrn't gapers that simply haven't a clue.  Just be on your toes and defend yourself as needed from the onslaught of bars.  But, seeing as your home area doesn't have any (yet) that need isn't as often as it could be.

 

post #100 of 102

I'd think the normal assumption should be the bar will be down, just like seat belts will be used. At the same time I agree that the person who take the initiative to pull the bar down needs to alert everyone to their intentions and the more courteous approach is to ASK if it's OK to pull down the bar. Two issues that have caused problems with members of my family: On 6 pack chairs it may be hard to be heard across the chair with music playing, folks talking, helmets snug and life moving forward. One young man gave my wife quite a cussing for pulling down a bar in just such an occasion and she shouted about as loud as she could to ask if it was OK and when nobody objected she pulled down the bar. Of course the guy who did not hear her did not know it was coming and he got hit in the head. Who was at fault? I don't know - sometimes stuff just happens but I do think it goes back to you should be expecting it to come down regardless.

Comparisons to years ago do not matter much. Double chairs had arms or center poles to hold on to. High speed quads and 6 packs offer no protection for the center occupants and frequently the guys that object to pulling down the bar are the folks that get on with back packs, water bottles, headphones and turn around to holler at the guys in the chair behind them! I was once young and invincible (I could also become invisible in a bar late at night) but alas, no more.

post #101 of 102

In the resort i worked at in Japan the bubble chairs would drop the bar and bubble automatically. I watched a guy knock himself off the chair one day because he was leaning too far forward with a backpack on. He was only a few meters out of the wheel house when it happened. was quite funny.

 

If i'm instructing then I always lower the bar, it sets a good example and that's what we're there to do. Out of uniform i rarely do if i'm riding the lift by myself or with friends, but am happy for others to lower it if they want. I've never been hit by the bar though in any circumstance. I suppose the old rule of "sit with your back against the chair" really pays off.

post #102 of 102

Thanks Bobby Lee.  There are alot of humerous things on the hill.  And alot of beautiful things. 

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