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hitting drops/cliffs with steep downward lips

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi,

 

  so today I went skiing to Brighton with a few friends and later in the day we decided to go over to Milly, I saw a cool drop right under the lift like 3/4 up the lift. It is like 8 feet high but you drop like 12 feet. I went and hit it thinking the "lip" was going to be somewhat flat and then drop off. Right when I got to the edge I was wrong and the lip was very steep down so my skis basically tip dived in the snow and I summersault, it was annoying because i really wanted to land it and wasn't expecting it to throw me forward like a front flip as much as it did. I am not hurt or anything but could you give me advice on how to hit these drop/cliffs? I dont like leaning back off the cliff because then i get into the back seat and do the crouch and crash if I dont just loop out on the landing.

 

 

Thanks

post #2 of 12


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarluver View Post

Hi,

 

  so today I went skiing to Brighton with a few friends and later in the day we decided to go over to Milly, I saw a cool drop right under the lift like 3/4 up the lift. It is like 8 feet high but you drop like 12 feet. I went and hit it thinking the "lip" was going to be somewhat flat and then drop off. Right when I got to the edge I was wrong and the lip was very steep down so my skis basically tip dived in the snow and I summersault, it was annoying because i really wanted to land it and wasn't expecting it to throw me forward like a front flip as much as it did. I am not hurt or anything but could you give me advice on how to hit these drop/cliffs? I dont like leaning back off the cliff because then i get into the back seat and do the crouch and crash if I dont just loop out on the landing.

 

 

Thanks



well if you feel forward you might want to try alittle further back, not back seat but further back than you were.

 

also 160cm skis for someone your size arent exactly hucking machines

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

I know, and I wish I would have known I was going to improve very fast before I bought these skis. Oh well, they will have to work for all next year then I will pick up some demos at the end of the season in the 170-178 range.

post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post


 



well if you feel forward you might want to try alittle further back, not back seat but further back than you were.

 

also 160cm skis for someone your size arent exactly hucking machines

I don't know really anything about hucking cliffs, but I do know a thing or two about basic physics. I'm also thinking that your skis might be too small for what you're doing (depending on your size). Everyone please correct me if I'm wrong in my theory, but it would seem that as you're dropping down, longer skis would be preferable, because they would make good contact with the run out before your weight is fully over the ski. Seems this would keep the tip from diving without having to get in the backseat. It's all personal preference with ski length, but I'm 165 lbs, 6'0 tall, and I my skis are 185, and another that are 186. Never had an issue with tip diving on drops, or anywhere for that matter.

 

It might be worth demo'ing a pair of longer skis to see if that makes any difference at all. Again, what I said is just my personal theory, and has no real personal basis, as I've never done anything like that with short skis like yours.
 

 

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

Yes, but like I wasn't expecting the edge of the drop to be like as steep as the landing, so I basically lost my balance and went way forward and my skis basically just shot straight down into the snow and popped out and I do a summersault and get a tasty mouthful of snow. I have had this happen before but without crashing and onn a smaller drop. (the one to the left of Wildcat as you are riding up the lift about 2/3 to the top) The edge was "dull" you could say, but then I have seen that same cliff with the snow blown to make it a nice flat than drop. and when you are approaching a cliff, you know how it looks like it is going to be like 2x the size it really is? that is what happened for me, it looked like the edge was going to be nice and flat, but when i got up it wasn't.

 

 

 

post #6 of 12

Know your take off. Know your landing. An inspection from the lift obviously didn't prepare you for the type of take off that you encountered. You made the fateful mistake of assuming incorrectly. Experience will help you to read the conditions. Until then, don't huck something you aren't certain of.

post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 

Ok, I just thought, I didn't side step all the way to the end of the drop like I usually do first when I am going to hit a cliff.

 

The landing was fine and the runout was fine

post #8 of 12

Now that you know what the take off is like, go back and stomp that shit.

post #9 of 12

When a cliff does not have a lip at the edge, the exit point, the take off point may actually be back somewhat from the edge. If you can't pop when you take off, you will not be balanced and stable in the air. And, at 8 to 12 feet, you are still describing rocks, not cliffs.

post #10 of 12

Yeah, looking at a drop from a lift isn't the greatest idea. Last year, in Verbier, I made the mistake of completely underestimating a 25 foot cliff with a flattish landing (10-15 degrees) to be a 15 foot cliff with a 30 degree landing (the bowl surrounding it was about 30 degrees). Yeah, that ended up as a "Oh Shit!", a couple skipped heart beats, a double ejection somer sault, and 10 minutes searching for the skis and putting them back on under 3+ feet of snow. Good fun...

post #11 of 12

On steep take-offs (and any bigger drop/jump, really), the pop at take-off is absolutely necessary, and, as davluri mentioned, you want to try and pop right at the rollover, if it's possible to clear it. A lot of times, I'll also take those types of drops at speed, even if it makes a 12'er into a 20'er (providing the landing is just as steep, much farther out).

 

Another tip, which you may not be doing, is extending the landing gear right before you touch down. Think about a plane landing - it lands at a tilted-upwards angle. This is what you want your skis to look like. Reach down with the tails of your skis as you land (with your feet angled upwards), and as you impact, you'll rock your weight and tips forward, stopping when your stance is centered and your skis are angled just slightly above the slope. Be careful, though - if you get your weight forward in an aggressive skier stance and/or end up angling your skis with the slope, or deeper, you'll likely go over the handlebars. To make it easier to get your weight centered on impact, avoiding a backseat landing, keep your arms way out front of your body, like a normal skier stance, during your entire time in the air and carry this through the landing.

 

So basically, you avoid taking a digger by starting the landing with your heels/tails and keeping your tips up, and you avoid getting in the backseat by keeping your arms forward and rocking your weight to centered as you impact (watch out for knee-to-the-face!!!). I've never hit anything huge, but this has worked well for me up to 40' and I do tend to have a cleaner stomp than some others I ski with, with an ability to start a turn almost immediately after landing.

 

Note that this doesn't work well on bigger drops with skis that have soft tails (S7s... yuck) because the impact will just fold the tail on you, causing a wheelie or hot-tub, rather than working in your favor by rocking the tips forward. You want the tail to punch into the landing. Oh, and keep in mind that the angle between your skis and the slope at the touchdown point should be a constant - meaning for steeper landings, you'll angle your feet less. If you don't, you'll be backseated. I always have a hard time remembering to adjust for this when I ski other areas (like Crested Butte), since a lot of landings at my home mountains tend to be on the flatter side of the spectrum.

 

DISCLAIMER: This is just what I've noticed over the past few years - I'm not a pro. I do ski with a few though, so maybe I'll have a short discussion next time I ski with one. I'm kind of curious now...


Edited by Brian Lindahl - 3/7/11 at 2:23pm
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinFromSA View Post

I don't know really anything about hucking cliffs, 

 


That is your hint to not post in this thread.

 

To the op you need a pop on a down angle take off. Your ski size can matter but on a 12' drop it really didn't hurt you here. Scout your takeoff, scout your drop and scout your landing. If you had done that you should have realised you would need a pop. 

 

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