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2012 Blizzard Bonafide - Page 3

post #61 of 462


Multi-dim ski like a JJ...
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

What's a 5-Point?



 

post #62 of 462
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post




IMHO this is both a strength and a weakness of ski tests/reviews. I'd expect by definition that the ski with the best overall performance in difficult conditions will also be the ski most people will find most useful in a one to three ski quiver. So it's a very reasonable criterion. OTOH, also by definition, it'll tend to be burlier than skis that shine in certain conditions like bumps, trees, or pure soft snow, since it will have to also shine in crap. At speed. Think big western resorts with lotsa vertical and accomplished older (past 30) skiers who like to blast big arcs. So IMO that there's a slight inevitable bias toward burly bruisers around here. Even Dawg, who is lighter than me, loves to charge and skis a lot of open slopes at speed. Let's iron out that crud..

 

 

 

Interesting experience I just had in Tahoe, which relates to your point.  I was skiing with Holiday and Davluri in the morning of the first day; 12" of heavy snow had fallen over the past day, and a lot of it had blown in overnight, so we were seeing some pretty smooth, fairly deep heavier windpack.  Definitely a day for the MX108's, in 187cm. I was cruising on them all morning: a bit of extra width, and more importantly length, helped me to ski that faster and more aggressively than I would otherwise have been able to on a sub 180cm ski.  In the morning especially, many people were on their "bigger" skis.

 

After noon, I noticed that most of the good stuff had been skied out and was getting bumped up. We were finding great, fairly smooth snow over on Chute 75.  I swapped out to my shorter, more nimble Sultan 94's in 178cm after lunch.  What a difference!  Whereas the MX108 was more suitable to wide-open GS turns (and bigger), the Sultan 94 was just the ticket for Chute 75, Cornice 2, Olympic Lady chute, that sort of terrain.  Not that I couldn't ski the Mx108, but they were awfully long and sluggish in tight spaces.  Not so the Sultan 94, which was made for that type of tighter off-piste skiing.  It was a treat to ski.  In the following days, I skied that Sultan 94 a ton, the MX88, the Bushwacker, the FX94, the Line Prophet 98, the LX92: all were much more suited to the skied-out conditions, tighter bumps, especially at speed, than the bigger skis. 

 

It wasn't just me, either: Holiday noted that he was happy on his MX98's the whole time, but could have used a wider ski in the morning.  And, most of the locals we saw skiing (Holiday knows everyone on that hill) had swapped out to their Mantra-type ski for the PM; most people weren't on soft, big rockers once the new snow was gone, as conditions change and you need something quicker and with some bite.  Going down 9cm in length and also something a bit narrower was the perfect PM ski for the conditions, as it was the following days, when no new snow had fallen.  Keep in mind that most Squaw locals are good technical skiers; you have to be to ski steeps and bumps

 

So, it really depends on your terrain. I don't think a  "daily driver" in 185cm+ is best for me; at my weight,  it takes a lot of work and a VERY high skill level to ski a bump zipper line on a ski that long.  178cm, OTOH, is not "easy" like a 170cm is, but also within reason for a good skier with active feet. Especially if it is at or under 100mm underfoot, and I can get it to bite early and with confidence.

 

Keep in mind that I am a good skier and ski above-average speeds, but am pretty light. When reviewing skis, I always try to state where exactly I am using it.  I don't see myself skiing a 187cm Bonafide in Tahoe skied-out conditions, but at 180cm, sure!  With that said, my MX88 was awfully good, and at least as good as the Bonafide, and just as suitable for skied-out conditions.  It would be a little quicker onto and off of the edge, a little more pop in the tail, but overall a quite similar feel.  The Bonafide would be a little more sliding-sideways feel until you give it that edge to have it hook up on steeps, so perhaps a touch more angulation  needed to get it to hook up, but overall, would get the job done just as effectively.  The terrain I skied when I wrote the MX98 review was similar, and it felt very similar to the Bonafide, more than the MX88 does.

Full selection of 2014 skis available right now from Dawgcatching.com.  PM for current deals and discount codes: save up to 25% on mid-season deals. 

Reply
post #63 of 462

This may not be PC, or board rule appropriate - and I hope that I'll be forgiven, but I just want to throw a sizable shout-out to Dawg/Scott for being a good guy. I just bought two pairs of blow-out end of season skis (Blizzard The One and wife's Blizzard 8.1) and the guy treated us as though we just bought 20 pairs of skis at full retail. Totally patient with questions and great service/shipping...Two thumbs up Scott AND THANKS TO ALL OF YOU for putting so much data on this site for us not in the industry and have jobs that only allow us semi-normal amount of ski days. You guys are great and all your efforts are appreciated!

 

(Scott, AKA Mark form Idaho - thanks again Scott!)

post #64 of 462
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post
 I took the Bone through the trees off KT22 (admittedly, not tight, but pretty heavy snow)  no problem, it was actually quicker than my 5-point ski (although that ski is 189 and not really soft)...I don't want to sound like a total fanboy, but I was extremely impressed.  


If you're that impressed, I'm impressed. Will demo for sure. Although for the record, the trees off of KT22 are normal Sierra pines, spaced in a sane manner that makes me think highly of pines' and firs' IQ. What we ski back here is closer to Jim's comment:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post
Nahhhhhh................ya'll need to get bizzy thinning out the treez...................biggrin.gif

 


Anyone old enough to recall what it was like when we all did telemark, and most of a resort was "woods?" That sense of just enjoying exploring, which included walking, no possibility on 220 cm's with cables to "power" through anything tight? Well, back here, that mentality lives, adjusted for soft rockers that allow you to windshield wipe twice and come to a full stop in about 1 second, then take on a little pillow. Lots of deciduous trees. Aspen, Birch, Maple, etc. Birches especially like colonizing secondary forests that have seen a lot of logging. Here's what young ones look like up close to your helmet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Stand_of_birch_trees.jpg We don't have so many nice linear 80 foot Pine or Fir that have the foresight to lose their bottom 10 feet of branches. There are many places where you have to ski in a crouch for a bit, or push away branches with one or both arms, or just take them in the face, otherwise bend into a pretzel, and often three or four turns are all you get before you have to slam on the brakes because the line's gone. And typically that line is less than one ski length wide. You do some walking, some low speed banking, some falling leafs, and after you're half way through, you're alternating loving the solitude (especially with a soft snow falling) and thinking hard about asking for that small chainsaw in your stocking. The turns you show in the pic are impressive evidence of the Bone's capabilities, not to mention some nice crud at Squaw, but they're not happening in this universe. And this kinda woods characterize a lot of the U.S., not just New England. It's that or narrow, crowded groomers, smooth and scratchy if blue, acres of bumps if black. So I'll be looking for fleets of Bones next season to replace the S3's and Ones and Slicers and other softies. Not. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

 

Powder isn't too hard to ski on anything. But a powder day on a purpose build powder ski is pretty special.

 

 

What is a flip core?


Two significant comments. First, yep, you can ski nearly anything in powder, even those 220 planks I mentioned above. And anything fat will make it easier, assuming the tips don't submarine. But something like a reverse reverse, or a 5-pointer, with rocker and the proper flex pattern, makes powder not just easy, but transcendent. So fun you have to vocalize. Personally, I'd like to see more development in the 100-110 mm range, but that's because I kinda like being down in the pow a little. YMMV. In any case, skiing a S7 in low density pow is not like skiing a fat twin, and I'd bet a Praxis Pow is even wilder yet...

 

Second, I'd love someone to tell me how flip core differs from, ah, any other design with a rockered tip and tail, some camber in the middle. Make the middle stiff and the ends soft, and yep, it'll initiate easily and then resist bending outside its sidecut radius. Suspect Blizzard has just done a typically great job of blending in the rocker to the traditional sidecut and camber. All good, but not something Never Seen On This Planet before...(Of course, my cynicism may not prevent me from discovering they make my MX88's obsolete after I demo.) wink.gif

 

post #65 of 462
Thread Starter 

Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

If you're that impressed, I'm impressed. Will demo for sure. Although for the record, the trees off of KT22 are normal Sierra pines, spaced in a sane manner that makes me think highly of pines' and firs' IQ. 

And this kinda woods characterize a lot of the U.S., not just New England. It's that or narrow, crowded groomers, smooth and scratchy if blue, acres of bumps if black. So I'll be looking for fleets of Bones next season to replace the S3's and Ones and Slicers and other softies. Not. 

 


Yeah, those are not the New England woods (not that I am nostalgic in any way), and not even tight trees for Squaw (woods off Red Dog are the real trees), so maybe we should wait until BWPA demoes the Bones ;-)  I obviously can speak only about how that ski works at Squaw that typically favors fatter burlier skis.  But I kind of like the place where I ski, so take my reviews for what they are.  Do demo the Blizzards though, you may be surprised.    

 

post #66 of 462



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post




If you're that impressed, I'm impressed. Will demo for sure. Although for the record, the trees off of KT22 are normal Sierra pines, spaced in a sane manner that makes me think highly of pines' and firs' IQ. What we ski back here is closer to Jim's comment:

 


Anyone old enough to recall what it was like when we all did telemark, and most of a resort was "woods?" That sense of just enjoying exploring, which included walking, no possibility on 220 cm's with cables to "power" through anything tight? Well, back here, that mentality lives, adjusted for soft rockers that allow you to windshield wipe twice and come to a full stop in about 1 second, then take on a little pillow. Lots of deciduous trees. Aspen, Birch, Maple, etc. Birches especially like colonizing secondary forests that have seen a lot of logging. Here's what young ones look like up close to your helmet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Stand_of_birch_trees.jpg We don't have so many nice linear 80 foot Pine or Fir that have the foresight to lose their bottom 10 feet of branches. There are many places where you have to ski in a crouch for a bit, or push away branches with one or both arms, or just take them in the face, otherwise bend into a pretzel, and often three or four turns are all you get before you have to slam on the brakes because the line's gone. And typically that line is less than one ski length wide. You do some walking, some low speed banking, some falling leafs, and after you're half way through, you're alternating loving the solitude (especially with a soft snow falling) and thinking hard about asking for that small chainsaw in your stocking. The turns you show in the pic are impressive evidence of the Bone's capabilities, not to mention some nice crud at Squaw, but they're not happening in this universe. And this kinda woods characterize a lot of the U.S., not just New England. It's that or narrow, crowded groomers, smooth and scratchy if blue, acres of bumps if black. So I'll be looking for fleets of Bones next season to replace the S3's and Ones and Slicers and other softies. Not. 

 


Two significant comments. First, yep, you can ski nearly anything in powder, even those 220 planks I mentioned above. And anything fat will make it easier, assuming the tips don't submarine. But something like a reverse reverse, or a 5-pointer, with rocker and the proper flex pattern, makes powder not just easy, but transcendent. So fun you have to vocalize. Personally, I'd like to see more development in the 100-110 mm range, but that's because I kinda like being down in the pow a little. YMMV. In any case, skiing a S7 in low density pow is not like skiing a fat twin, and I'd bet a Praxis Pow is even wilder yet...

 

Second, I'd love someone to tell me how flip core differs from, ah, any other design with a rockered tip and tail, some camber in the middle. Make the middle stiff and the ends soft, and yep, it'll initiate easily and then resist bending outside its sidecut radius. Suspect Blizzard has just done a typically great job of blending in the rocker to the traditional sidecut and camber. All good, but not something Never Seen On This Planet before...(Of course, my cynicism may not prevent me from discovering they make my MX88's obsolete after I demo.) wink.gif

 

Beyond,


Sure do know what you mean regarding the kind of tree skiing we have here in the east.  Numerous shots through the trees are often nothing more then a ski length wide, sometimes even less then that requiring one to "have faith" that once you straight line that little shot you will have enough space to turn and slow down or even stop completely.  But even when things open up a bit and you can actually let your skis run some it's still much tighter then anything I have skied out west - at least from my very limited trips out there.

 

So earlier this season I had been thinking about simply getting a fatter pair of skis to help make things a little more fun and a little less survival skiing for the trees.  But after reading the numerous posts on this list, I think I am hopefully beginning to understand that a ski can be fat and ski powder really well but still be more of a big mountain ski that needs some room to turn versus the kind of fat powder ski that gives up some of that high speed stability for quick turning ease.  Now I find myself looking more at the 5 point type skis with rocker and a nice medium flex (I am a lightweight), such as the S7 or the DPS Wailer 112, as something that may find more use here in VT then something like a big Kastle.  Although demoing the Kastle MX 108 earlier this year at JH was more fun then I had expected and I could not believe how easy it was to ski that ski.  But I didn't have an opportunity to see how well it would perform in the tight confines here in the east though.   

 

But as others have been stating on this thread, these particular Blizzards may be a bit of an anomaly, in that they somewhat defy convention.  Maybe? Either way, I am finding this a great thread.  Thanks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #67 of 462
Quote:
Originally Posted by easternskr View Post
 Although demoing the Kastle MX 108 earlier this year at JH was more fun then I had expected and I could not believe how easy it was to ski that ski.  But I didn't have an opportunity to see how well it would perform in the tight confines here in the east though.   


easternskr, may have missed your post on this. Where did you take it at JH? What length? Your weight? Curious because two of Epic's more reliable lighter skiers prefer different lengths, both seem to agree that it's easier to maneuver than you'd expect. But other sites have emphasized the bombs-away quality. My experience with the 98's is yes and yes; quicker than expected, but likes to run. There are some really interesting 105-110 skis out there next season, given the Cochise, LP, BMX, Olympus, revamped Goats, hmmm anyone know if Rotor 106 is getting an update? 

 

post #68 of 462

No update for the Stockli Rotor 106.  Instead you'll find the Stormrider 95 (tip rocker) and Stormrider 110 TT (tip and tail rocker).  Search on the forum for the specs I've already posted.

post #69 of 462
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post


Yeah, those are not the New England woods (not that I am nostalgic in any way), and not even tight trees for Squaw (woods off Red Dog are the real trees), so maybe we should wait until BWPA demoes the Bones ;-)  I obviously can speak only about how that ski works at Squaw that typically favors fatter burlier skis.  But I kind of like the place where I ski, so take my reviews for what they are.  Do demo the Blizzards though, you may be surprised.    

 


Ill have  chance tomorrow I think, I just hope the snow is good enough to give them a fair review as its been crusted to the pointed that my Katana arent even a good enough tool for the job. So I am sure that the bonafide wont be good right now...

 

With that said I am the proud new owner of some 180cm Bushwacker's .

 

post #70 of 462

I'm 57, 5'10", 155.  Ski about 25 days per year, though I wish it were more.  Half or more of those days are usually up at Stowe.  And much of that time is in the woods.

 

My first time to Jackson Hole was late this past January.  Instead of taking my skis with me I demoed different skis while there.  I skied both the 2010/2011 Kastle MX98 in a 178 and the Kastle MX108 in a 177.  Got to ski both in some new powder and chopped up powder.  Skied Saratoga Bowl, Moran Woods, and some runs off of the Thunder Chair (Paintbrush and Tower 3?), and some runs off the Quad.  So although we did ski some "woods" here and there, we didn't really ski anything anywhere as tight as what we have in the east.  And both skis of course, really excelled in the more "open" areas, especially the 108.

 

I thought the MX98 was incredibly easy to ski in most all conditions.  Didn't have the float of course that the MX108 had, but it was quite simply easy and fun.  I could ski it fast or slow, vary turn shape and so on.  It was very playful.  I found the 108 to be somewhat similar except not as quick to turn (obviously).  But still, powerful on one hand, but easy and forgiving on another.  I was actually surprised by how much fun it was (though of course, skiing lower down the hill on some frozen groomers was not much fun).  I had thought that either ski would be great here in the east and up at Stowe.  I still feel that way and would love to demo one of these here in the east sometime.  But I am also intrigued by skis like the S7, as something that may really excel in the trees.  I had honestly never even thought about "5 point" type skis before, bascially shying away from their unique design.  But the many positives I have read on this list have me rethinking this.

 

Currently my "fattest" ski is a pair of 2007? Goats, the gold version.  Honestly, this is a great ski in the right conditions and I had a lot of fun on these a few weeks ago up at Stowe.  But like most of us who post on this list, it's always fun to check out the latest new toys and the traditionally shaped rockered skis along with rockered/5 point skis are all really intriguing.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by beyond View Post




easternskr, may have missed your post on this. Where did you take it at JH? What length? Your weight? Curious because two of Epic's more reliable lighter skiers prefer different lengths, both seem to agree that it's easier to maneuver than you'd expect. But other sites have emphasized the bombs-away quality. My experience with the 98's is yes and yes; quicker than expected, but likes to run. There are some really interesting 105-110 skis out there next season, given the Cochise, LP, BMX, Olympus, revamped Goats, hmmm anyone know if Rotor 106 is getting an update? 

 



 

post #71 of 462



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by easternskr View Post

I'm 57, 5'10", 155.  Ski about 25 days per year, though I wish it were more.  Half or more of those days are usually up at Stowe.  And much of that time is in the woods.

 

My first time to Jackson Hole was late this past January.  Instead of taking my skis with me I demoed different skis while there.  I skied both the 2010/2011 Kastle MX98 in a 178 and the Kastle MX108 in a 177.  Got to ski both in some new powder and chopped up powder.  Skied Saratoga Bowl, Moran Woods, and some runs off of the Thunder Chair (Paintbrush and Tower 3?), and some runs off the Quad.  So although we did ski some "woods" here and there, we didn't really ski anything anywhere as tight as what we have in the east.  And both skis of course, really excelled in the more "open" areas, especially the 108.

 

I thought the MX98 was incredibly easy to ski in most all conditions.  Didn't have the float of course that the MX108 had, but it was quite simply easy and fun.  I could ski it fast or slow, vary turn shape and so on.  It was very playful.  I found the 108 to be somewhat similar except not as quick to turn (obviously).  But still, powerful on one hand, but easy and forgiving on another.  I was actually surprised by how much fun it was (though of course, skiing lower down the hill on some frozen groomers was not much fun).  I had thought that either ski would be great here in the east and up at Stowe.  I still feel that way and would love to demo one of these here in the east sometime.  But I am also intrigued by skis like the S7, as something that may really excel in the trees.  I had honestly never even thought about "5 point" type skis before, bascially shying away from their unique design.  But the many positives I have read on this list have me rethinking this.

 

Currently my "fattest" ski is a pair of 2007? Goats, the gold version.  Honestly, this is a great ski in the right conditions and I had a lot of fun on these a few weeks ago up at Stowe.  But like most of us who post on this list, it's always fun to check out the latest new toys and the traditionally shaped rockered skis along with rockered/5 point skis are all really intriguing.



 


I should add one more thing.  Although I found both Kastles easy and fun to ski, I could also tell how powerful they both were.  When we skied some wider open terrain, and our speeds increased, these skis were absolutely stable, especially the 108.  I would guess the 108's speed limit is beyond my ability, or at least, I don't really desire to be skiing that fast.   But it was amazing that something that could go that fast with that stability, especially in chopped up powder/crud, could still be easy to turn at slower speeds and have a forgiving feel. 

 

post #72 of 462

I will be skiing my Bonafides tomorrow.....full report will follow. 

post #73 of 462

My stats: 6', 230 lbs, 59 yrs_young, level 8, skiing groomed - steeper the better, trees (Vt. tight), moguls - powder bumps preferred and eastern ice. Daily ski Volkl AC50, 177cm and Western powder boards 173 Icelantic Shamans. Boots - Dalbello Krypton Pro. Ski 40-50 days/season mostly @ Killington. This season 5 days @ Jackson Hole, 1 Grand Targhee and 6 days @ Utah resorts - Deer Valley, Park City, Canyons, Alta, Snowbird.

 

Thanks to the generosity of Wasatchback I was able to demo 180 Bonafides for two days last week during my trip to Park City. The first day was at Deer Valley in mostly spring snow unless going high and in trees to find untracked, soft snow and the second day was at Snowbird in a mix of hard/soft conditions depending upon the altitude. On DV manicured groomers the ski had surprising grip. The first high speed turn attempted caught me by surprise as I expected a "Shaman" slide but they gripped with NO SLIP and I almost let the skis complete the turn without my sharing the experience. On a lower part of the same groomer the surface bacame firmer approaching ice and while the edge hold was less then my AC50s it was still very good considering the 98 mm waist. At pedal to the medal groomer speeds there was a bit of tip chatter but not so it impacted control or mach speed enjoyment. Turning  - definitely favored GS oriented turns but were smooth and predictable. In soft chopped snow as solid as on groomers with minimal tip deflection. Soft bumps, while not quick turning, still controllable and fun. Hard, sharly cut bumps, not so much. The longer turning radius (compared to my AC50s) took a bit of getting used to in trees but the float and edge hold made it excellent in the soft snow conditions. I found a large sweet spot but mostly skied with a centered stance.

 

Overall an excellent Western everyday ski I would highly recommend. Eastern - close but given the more prevalent hard pack / icy conditions I am not so sure and would probably stick to a 85-88 mm ski. Still, a good chance a pair will find its way into my 2011-12 quiver.

 

Wasatchback - THANKS for providing me the demo opportunity !!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Falcon_O aka Charlie

post #74 of 462
Thread Starter 

Falcon-O: At your size-why 180 and not the 187?  Did the 180 ski short or not?

post #75 of 462

As I ski a 177 AC50 Wasatchback suggeted I try the 180 AND he had one available to demo. I did not think it skied short and if I purchase one it will be the 180.

post #76 of 462

 

Title:  What a Gulla-bull...what a Nin-cow-poop

 

Product: Review: 2012 Blizzard Bonafide

 

Length/size Tested: 180cm

 

Environment of Conditions:

*Location of review: Northstar/Lookout

*Runs Taken: Not enough

*Snow Conditions: 20" of fresh and still dumping

*Demo or Purchase: Own

 

Summary (inc. Strengths & Weaknesses):

 

189576_10150174856081138_540901137_8919848_1698285_n.jpg 

 

 

 

What a day at Northstar It start off with a storm coming in "late in the day"..late in the day turned into 10 AM. All of the cliches came out in this day...Snow Flakes for brunch, Free refills, Puking...all of them...simply, it was dumping. I was thinking great, i brought a knife to a gun fight..a 98mm ski to combat the upcoming feet of snow. Needless to say, I was well prepared with the Bonafide. Rarely have I gotten on a ski that felt so well balanced as the Bonafide. In the 5" of fresh that was over the groomers, the Bonafide cranked out beautiful sheet short and medium turns. In the powder, even at 98 underfoot, the early rise in the tip and the rise in the tail it was fantastic with no tip dive and the balance of a cat, never once did I feel that I was going over the handlebars. The Bonafide excelled everywhere I brought it, bumps, trees, drops, everywhere. I was amazed how well this ski handed. As far as the graphics....the bull reminds me of the bull in the above "Bully For Bugs" cartoon. This is the best $800 ski coming out for 2012...the best part in, it is $699.00. and Blizzard has clearly tossed the gauntlet to the other manufacturers..in the words of Bugs Bunny..."As you know...this means war..."

 

 

Other skis in class: Watea 98, Kastle BMX98, Volkl Mantra, Line Prophet 98 and a plethora of other good skis in the highly contested 98mm category

 

 

Tester Info:

Age: 47

Height/Weight: 5'10 185lb

Average days on snow: 0-10, 11-25, 30 (pick one)

Years Skiing: 0-5, 6-15, 15-30, 30+  (pick one)

 

Aggressiveness: Conservative / Moderate / Aggressive / Competitor (pick one)

 

post #77 of 462

And what an ultramaroon!

 

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

How well you are able to ski is related to how hard you are willing to fall.

post #78 of 462

Just have to say..hope they make enough of these for demand. Looks like these may just sell..a lot. Nice review cool.gif

post #79 of 462

glad my name is at the top of the "mee too" list!  :) looking forward to the final release sans' the plastic bull head which I plan to either stick on the dashboard or put on a chain for that chic rad' park look.......

post #80 of 462
Thread Starter 

I hope my name is on that same list too.  I actually dont mind the bullhead, that makes no difference for me either way, but what an exciting ski.  

post #81 of 462

Alex,

 

No worries, you and Finn are on the same list...

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

... and for the DPS's too. drool.gif

 

 

post #82 of 462

Trying to get a handle on length choice.

Maybe 180 is the current size available for demo.

Missed my chance to try any Bonafide (it was a 187)

when i caught a cold, and missed a few days.

By the time I was back, the rep had taken his stash back.

So, I wonder if (bigger) folks see the 187 as their morning

choice and 180 as the tracked up choice?

Seems to me, if you are choosing a 98 as opposed to something

narrower, then max float for the ski would weigh heavily?

6'2" 180 lb.+... athletic and speedy, yet 62 years old.

Ended up with MX88 on a big hill, so have demoed a bunch of

wider sub 100s and a couple of 100+... seems length on a big

day can help... even if it is only 2.8" (Bonafide).

post #83 of 462

If someone wants to take mine out, I have a pair of 180's set up with demo binders. Shoot me a PM and I WILL have these at the Gathering in Colorah doo. For the lady folk, TC has her Black Pearls 166's with and adjustable track too. 

post #84 of 462

JOhn, best thing to do IMHO, is to start with the 180 and see how that feels. My guess is that it will be enough. I am "hearing" that the build on this ski i such that even the 180 is uber-stable. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John J View Post

Trying to get a handle on length choice.

Maybe 180 is the current size available for demo.

Missed my chance to try any Bonafide (it was a 187)

when i caught a cold, and missed a few days.

By the time I was back, the rep had taken his stash back.

So, I wonder if (bigger) folks see the 187 as their morning

choice and 180 as the tracked up choice?

Seems to me, if you are choosing a 98 as opposed to something

narrower, then max float for the ski would weigh heavily?

6'2" 180 lb.+... athletic and speedy, yet 62 years old.

Ended up with MX88 on a big hill, so have demoed a bunch of

wider sub 100s and a couple of 100+... seems length on a big

day can help... even if it is only 2.8" (Bonafide).



 

post #85 of 462

SJ, Phil and others, how would you compare the 2012 Line Prophet 98 to the Bonafied? I demo'd them both at Mt Rose in the chutes on March 20th on a good Pow day but had limited time on both skis.I found the Line surfed the deep well, easy turning and had a little more float than the bonafied but had the feeling that on a firmer surface the Blizzard would have more stability and be more responsive. Any thoughts on variances between these two skis would be appreciated as basically coming down to choosing between these as my daily drivers for next year. Currently on 178 Mythic Riders...5'10". 185 lb, farily solid level 8, skier, regurlary riding the chutes at Rose....West bowl/chute 75 at sqaw...it's a good life.

 

Also had the Bodacious out that day, burly, stable and fast!

 

Thanks for the input.

 

Lee

post #86 of 462

The P-98 is a very good ski and a nice upgrade over the current P-100. Basically, in comparing those two, I'd say that the Prophet series really doesn't feel like a twin anymore. Compared to the Bonafide........different. The Bone has a longer rise in the front and a small amount of rise at the tail. The amount of rise however, is pretty low. The Bone has a more slithery feel at low edge angles but at high edge angles the more continuous flex gives it more the feel of skiing the full length of the ski while the P-98 really has little feel past the contact point. I found the Bonafide to be a more stable and damp ride in mixed soft snow and chop up to maybe boot top depth. Have not skied the Prophet any deeper than that but have skied the Bonafide up to about knee deep snow and found it to be exceptional for a 98mm ski.

 

SJ

Reply
post #87 of 462

John,

 

I demoed the 180 a day at Deer Valley and a day a Snowbird several weeks ago on groomer steeps, powdered trees and moguls both hard and soft. I am 6', 230 lbs, 59yo and a level 8 aggressive skier. I did not find the 180 lacking in float or stability at speed and would choose that length if I add one to my quiver.

 

Falcon_O aka Charlie

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John J View Post

Trying to get a handle on length choice.

Maybe 180 is the current size available for demo.



 

post #88 of 462

First off, great thread...  I've been thinking all season about what the next set of skis are going to be and these very could well be it. 

 

Someone asked about what 'flipcore' is....  From the Blizzard website:  

 

Flipcore - Blizzard Flipcore is a revolutionary new rocker technology. Natural spring, lightweight floatation in powder, while yet retaining excellent stability are the immediate advantages of Blizzard’s new construction. All of this is made possible through the flipped wood core (the ski is actually made upside down in the mold), whose downward-facing convex side forms the natural rocker. The natural rocker shape is produced without having to bend or artificially shape the ski in a press. The end result is a new rockered construction that reaches a new level of stability and even pressure distribution that is unheard of in freeride ski construction.

 

Blizzard website also references THIS thread as the the place to find out what the early reviewers are saying:  http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/Products/BigMountain/SNEAKPEEKBonafide.html

 

Does anyone know anywhere in New England that I could demo The One?  beyond's earlier description of skiing in the trees sums is what I like to do perfectly.  I'm on a pair of '08 Atomic Crimson Tis that are too short, too stiff and getting to be too old....  Maneuverability in the trees is A1A for me...  

 

FWIW, I'm 6', 230 and screaming towards 30 :(  Level 7 right now, Level 8 when I'm actually in shape....  Desk jobs suck.

post #89 of 462
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattGoose View Post

Blizzard website also references THIS thread as the the place to find out what the early reviewers are saying:  http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/Products/BigMountain/SNEAKPEEKBonafide.html

Wow, we ARE getting famous.... smile.gif
 

 

post #90 of 462

SJ, Phil and other reviewers,

 

Any thoughts on advantages of the Bonafied vs. the 2012 Line Prophet 100. IBoth are 98 mm underfoot and I skied both at Mt Rose on a demo day there,  but as it was a fairly deep pow day it was not possible to compare the two skis on anything but POW in the chutes and elsewhere and they were only available for a limited time on each as I got to them later in the day, after trying out some of the larger POW skis, e.g. Bodacious, JJ...

 

Any input is appreciated as I am basically choosing between the Line and the Blizzard as as my daily go to ski for next season. Leaning towards the Blizzard for the edge gridge, speed and handling on hard pack Tahoe mornings, but it would be good to hear other folks thoughts on both skis.

 

Thanks,

 

Lee

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