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Tech advances, golf versus skiing. - Page 3

Poll Results: More advances in gear and tecnhique since 1990; golf or skiing?

 
  • 35% (5)
    Skis and skiing have changed more than golf and golf clubs since 1990
  • 14% (2)
    Golf and golf clubs have changed more than skis and skiing since 1990
  • 42% (6)
    Both sports have changes so much it is difficult to tell, both about the same.
  • 7% (1)
    Flawed, all polls are flawed.
14 Total Votes  
post #61 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by wooley12 View Post

For us mere humans, the fun quotient has definitely been enhanced.

 


Welcome to the group Wooley! Your quote is the main reason I started teaching 18 years ago. I had noticed that technology had made the sport more fun, but that the sport was not growing and needed help. Here we are almost 20 years later and we still have the same problem. Not enough people realize that the sport is more fun than ever. 

post #62 of 74

I'd say the biggest thing holding golf back these days is the pace of play.  If you can't get around the course in 4 hours (or less), it's time to re-evaluate your approach.  Even when I was a beginner and hacking my way around the course, I still wouldn't hold anyone up.  Drives me absolutely nuts.

 

I love this concept: http://sports.yahoo.com/golf/blog/devil_ball_golf/post/Step-aside-slowpokes-Vegas-course-creates-Expr?urn=golf-wp1242
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post


Welcome to the group Wooley! Your quote is the main reason I started teaching 18 years ago. I had noticed that technology had made the sport more fun, but that the sport was not growing and needed help. Here we are almost 20 years later and we still have the same problem. Not enough people realize that the sport is more fun than ever. 



 

post #63 of 74
Thread Starter 
Quote:

Originally Posted by steveturner View Post

 

Despite the improvements changes in average handicaps and scores have been small.

 



I'm going to suggest that at the level where people are actually serious enough about golf to track their actual handicap the variance in gear makes less difference.  These folks can make good contact with any kind of club and adjust just like seasoned and experienced skiers can ski well on older gear and a bit better on newer gear.  It is the first and second year athletes that get the most benefits from modern gear.

post #64 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaytierney View Post

I'd say the biggest thing holding golf back these days is the pace of play.  If you can't get around the course in 4 hours (or less), it's time to re-evaluate your approach.  Even when I was a beginner and hacking my way around the course, I still wouldn't hold anyone up.  Drives me absolutely nuts.

 

I love this concept: http://sports.yahoo.com/golf/blog/devil_ball_golf/post/Step-aside-slowpokes-Vegas-course-creates-Expr?urn=golf-wp1242
 



 


 

I normally walk an empty course in 3 - 3.5 hours. My best time in a cart is 2.25 hours. In good company I don't mind a 4 hour round. I've done a 6 hour scramble for a good cause. We have 10 minute tee times. At 10 minutes a hole it should take 180 minutes to play.

 

We've got high speed lifts. Where are the go cart golf carts? A local course I play has one cart where the governor is broken. The rangers use it to buzz around the course. Imagine if all the carts were fast enough to play 5 minutes per hole and rangers enforced that pace of play!  Courses could double their revenue and maybe go higher for charging a premium to play faster.

post #65 of 74

I believe my longest round was around 7 hours... I shot a 77.  This was at a public course in California (ridiculously-crowded).  It involved a 5-some, and walking.

 

 

Now, what I hate is on the course when you have an important tee shot or an approach shot and you have to wait like 30 minutes.  When you step up and hit your shot more likely than not I've found the shots can be bad.

 

 

Likewise I can't stand super-long lift-lines when you are "in the zone" on the hill.  Nothing like letting your rhythm and fluidity expire as your muscles slowly freeze up in a 20 minute lift-line.

post #66 of 74

That's insane.  The closest I've come to that is a 3 hour front 9.  At the time I was only one over, but I just couldn't stand it any longer and left at the turn.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BoredAtBMBW View Post

I believe my longest round was around 7 hours... I shot a 77.  This was at a public course in California (ridiculously-crowded).  It involved a 5-some, and walking.



 

post #67 of 74

For golf, the funny thing is most people really do play better if they play quickly.  In some cases people start agonizing about everything because they're gambling, but more often the slow play just doesn't make sense. 

 

I totally would pay a premium for fast play -- in some ways I'll already do that by playing in really hot or cold temps, etc.

post #68 of 74

Re: Pace of Play

 

Funny you should mention that. It was always one of my dad's ( 1937 Tri-Cities Caddy Champion) important concepts when he was showing me the game. His rule was to try not to hold up the group behind you. I'm actually working on a system that will decrease the 18 hole playing time of the average foursome by 30 minutes without having to play any faster. It's called "10 rules for 10 Seconds" and my theory is that by using only one of the rules a group will save the 1/2 hour. Plan on getting a local course to let me out on a cart with a stopwatch to test it.

 

Couple of years back I was playing with a pickup group at the local muni ( Rumored to be a Donald Ross design but has Robert Trent Jones features with elevated tees and multi tiered greens. $18 for 18 holes). Anyway, one player would take 6 beautiful practice swings and then dub his shot about 40 yards. 6 swings and a dub every time. I suggested that he might do better by taking only one practice swing then hit the ball. He balked at first but finally relented. Made a beautiful, fluid practice stroke and then dubbed his shot for 40 yards again. "See" he said, "It didn't help"   I replied, "Yeah, but it was a whole lot quicker."

 

A little Robert Trent Jones story for you. He went to Cornell where he created his own course of study for golf course design. After graduating. in 1937 or 38 I believe, one of his first designs was Midvale CC here in Rochester. Well, the stock market tanked and he was never paid for his work. At the time, only the government was sure to pay it's bills so he proceeded to design a goodly number of public courses here in Upstate NY. All built with a limited use of earth moving machinery. I've played them all.

 

 


Edited by wooley12 - 4/28/11 at 12:53pm
post #69 of 74

Ok. A slow play story. Snuck off on a weekday to play my favorite RTJ course. Beautiful fall. All the trees in full color and 75 degrees. The grounds crew couldn't keep up with the falling leaves so lots  on the ground. Group of old timers in front of me and a lost ball on every shot. 1st hole=45min. 2nd hole=45 min. A ranger came up and I gave him 1 dz golf balls. Told him to give them to the group in front so the next 12 lost balls were on me. He did as I asked and wouldn't you know, they took my offering and yet continued to look for lost balls on every shot. 3 holes and 3 hours, I walked off.

post #70 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by wooley12 View Post

Re: Pace of Play

 

Funny you should mention that. It was always one of my dad's ( 1937 Tri-Cities Caddy Champion) important concepts when he was showing me the game. His rule was to try not to hold up the group behind you. I'm actually working on a system that will decrease the 18 hole playing time of the average foursome by 30 minutes without having to play any faster. It's called "10 rules for 10 Seconds" and my theory is that by using only one of the rules a group will save the 1/2 hour. Plan on getting a local course to let me out on a cart with a stopwatch to test it.

 

Couple of years back I was playing with a pickup group at the local muni ( Rumored to be a Donald Ross design but has Robert Trent Jones features with elevated tees and multi tiered greens. $18 for 18 holes). Anyway, one player would take 6 beautiful practice swings and then dub his shot about 40 yards. 6 swings and a dub every time. I suggested that he might do better by taking only one practice swing then hit the ball. He balked at first but finally relented. Made a beautiful, fluid practice stroke and then dubbed his shot for 40 yards again. "See" he said, "It didn't help"   I replied, "Yeah, but it was a whole lot quicker."

 

A little Robert Trent Jones story for you. He went to Cornell where he created his own course of study for golf course design. After graduating. in 1937 or 38 I believe, one of his first designs was Midvale CC here in Rochester. Well, the stock market tanked and he was never paid for his work. At the time, only the government was sure to pay it's bills so he proceeded to design a goodly number of public courses here in Upstate NY. All built with a limited use of earth moving machinery. I've played them all.

 

 



 

post #71 of 74
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wooley12 View Post

Ok. A slow play story. Snuck off on a weekday to play my favorite RTJ course. Beautiful fall. All the trees in full color and 75 degrees. The grounds crew couldn't keep up with the falling leaves so lots  on the ground. Group of old timers in front of me and a lost ball on every shot. 1st hole=45min. 2nd hole=45 min. A ranger came up and I gave him 1 dz golf balls. Told him to give them to the group in front so the next 12 lost balls were on me. He did as I asked and wouldn't you know, they took my offering and yet continued to look for lost balls on every shot. 3 holes and 3 hours, I walked off.


What ever happened to casually walking up to a group like that and saying.. "mind if I play through"?  Or, better yet, what happened to a slow group whistling and waving at the folks behind them telling them to go ahead and hit/play though?
 

Sounds like golf manners have gone down the tubes.  I guess I'm glad I haven't been playing lately.

 

post #72 of 74

Right on about manners going down the tube in general. On the links, behind the wheel and in the supermarket. Rethinking the day, it was actually 2 holes in 1 1/2 hours. Never played the 3rd. In that particular instance. 1- I can't whistle. 2 - It was a gorgeous fall day at my favorite place. 3- After 2 holes and 1 1/2 hrs I was already pushing my time allotment and the 3rd hole was an easy place to walk off. How about the time I met an after diner sixsome on the 1st tee and one a-hole wouldn't let me play through as a single !! After they took a combined 18 shots to get out of range I ripped off rage induced personal best drive, picked it up and skipped to the second tee. Sometimes you ski powder and sometimes you ski crud but you ARE in the mountains.

post #73 of 74

Playing today got me thinking of this thread, not all technology need be new to be effective.  Some courses are increasing the defense of the course by reintroducing some old approaches.  My home course (named appropriately enough, "The Home Course") has been re-sculpturing traps, in some fiendish locations, with near  vertical sod walls toward the green.  Think St. Andrews, 4'-8' walls; they are darned unfriendly, if you roll in near the base.  Length is being added also, about 500 yards from the tips.

 

Have you been seeing these 'technical enhancements' at your courses too?

post #74 of 74

My current home course has been renovating their bunkers in preparation for the local US Open Qualifier. At 74.4/144 and 7038 yards they don't really need to make it any tougher. Efforts include improving drainage, stapling mats to the bunker walls (to help retain the sand) underneath the sand and adding tons of sand.

 

Most course renovations that I've seen in my area have been for logistical reasons (e.g. increasing the dam size on the water storage pond, rerouting holes due to road expansion taking a hole, thinning trees to increase sunlight/aeration of greens, replacing turf on greens to keep them healthier, new tee boxes for women and kids, additional cart path options to reduce fairway crossing/increase pace of play). My old home course actually reduced the size of some bunkers during an effort to increase pace of play.

 

I'm very interested in seeing the newly renovated Congressional next month.

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